Log in:  

Register

World Politics

Grab a short black and come join in the non-cycling discussion. Favourite books, movies, holiday destinations, other sports - chat about it all in the cafe.

Yesterday 12:44

blullnux, the operative word i used was viable atm...

should such an axis/coalition/alliance get formed - and be functional at the same time - it must be based on a common set of well agreed and coordinated policies NOT just declarations or tentative intentions..

i just dont see such a set, even if a short term, with his sultanate whoeness in its midst . for instance, the 3 should clearly arrive at the assad fate. should he stay or should he go and most importantly which rebel groups should be supported and rejected by all 3. the russians will never give up on the idea of the kurds being sidelined from the geneva all-syrian talks vehemently opposed by erdogan. erdogan is also is too tied to the saudis by their sunni faith which is totally unacceptable to iran..and there are many more irreconcilable problems in the mess...

but if you look at the erdogan maneuvers as the tools to extract more concessions from the eu and the us ('give me the visa free travel', 'abandon the kurds', 'accelerate my ticket to the eu etc etc), it suddenly become clear what he's after.

only if turkey voluntarily leaves nato (or pushed out of it), there can be any serious dealing with her either short or long term.

everything else is posturing and wheeling...
in foreign policy there are no eternal friendships or eternal enemies, only eternal interests
As for Marit, without the medicine, she would have no chance' -OEB
User avatar python
Veteran
 
Posts: 5,609
Joined: 25 Sep 2009 01:01

Today 09:56

as was obvious from several of my latest posts, i've been 'desperately' trying to understand the bigger picture around the turkish invasion of syria...i seem to have found an informative and knowledgeable source...

What comes next for Turkey after Jarablus victory?

Read more: http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2016/08/turkey-syria-what-is-next-after-operation-euphrates-shield.html#ixzz4Io6O1yE4

the author (a turkish military expert turned analyst) tries to entertain turkey's grand strategy, the corresponding kurdish moves and the potential reactions from washington and moscow.

the summary of his thoughts is that if turkey keeps the invasion sufficiently anti-isis, they will be allowed to dominate the kurds and extend the invasion west by creating a 65 mile buffer in northern syria. if not, that is, if turkey will primarily go after the kurds, the author thinks the us and russia will take the kurdish side. the key he believes will be in the effectiveness of the turkish-armed rebels calling themselves a free syrian army..

i have some questions about his analysis but will pause for now...

the article is best followed with a syrian civil war map
in foreign policy there are no eternal friendships or eternal enemies, only eternal interests
As for Marit, without the medicine, she would have no chance' -OEB
User avatar python
Veteran
 
Posts: 5,609
Joined: 25 Sep 2009 01:01

Today 10:25

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/aug/29/un-pays-tens-of-millions-to-assad-regime-syria-aid-programme-contracts

This shows the uselessness of aid in the world. Although, it would be hard to get aid to Syria without passing it through the govt, but as it happens so often the money ends up in the hands of the rich of that country.
Brullnux
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2,516
Joined: 31 Mar 2015 14:41

Previous

Return to General

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

Back to top