2019 Giro d'Italia Stage 11: Carpi - Novi Ligure 206 km

Who will win stage 11?

  • Pascal Ackermann

    Votes: 3 6.8%
  • Elia Viviani

    Votes: 17 38.6%
  • Caleb Ewan

    Votes: 14 31.8%
  • Arnaud Demare

    Votes: 4 9.1%
  • Matteo Moschetti

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • SELIG Rüdiger

    Votes: 1 2.3%
  • Giacomo Nizzolo

    Votes: 1 2.3%
  • CIMOLAI Davide

    Votes: 1 2.3%
  • Other (Vino/Remco)

    Votes: 3 6.8%

  • Total voters
    44
Mar 14, 2009
3,436
0
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Eshnar wrote

Wednesday, May 22nd

START TIME: 11.55 CEST

FINISH TIME: ~17.15 CEST






Technical Overview:
After a pan flat stage along the Po Valley, we get another pan flat stage along the Po Valley. Since this one comes just before four consecutive hilly/mountain stages (six if we don't consider the rest day), I can understand that this stage is easy. The missed chance was yesterday. This stage is also quite long, just because Carpi and Novi Ligure are farther apart than Ravenna and Modena are, so increasing the difficulty of this stage would have meant make it much longer, in an edition that is already overstepping the 3500 km limit. The route is pretty unimaginative, as it makes a long arc following the foot of the Appennines, careful at avoding any possible climb. Maybe it's worth mentioning that the final kms are all slightly uphill (1-2%), so this might change the established pecking order between the sprinters. It's their penultimate chance (the last one for those who are not planning to reach Verona), so they'd better take it.



What to expect:
Another mass sprint.


Carpi
 
Since this one comes just before four consecutive hilly/mountain stages (six if we don't consider the rest day), I can understand that this stage is easy.
Thanks Vancouver for at least providing a feasible explanation for this stage. It still does not make it any easier to endure.Oh well its stage 11 and the real Giro starts tomorrow at last.

Maybe the slight uphill ending could help Caleb Ewan?
 
Tomorrow will be a day full of surprises. There will be attacks by several riders. Some of them will form a leading group called the breakaway. They will stay away for a long time. However the bunch will come back towards the end. A sprinter will win the sprint.
 
Re:

Pantani_lives said:
Tomorrow will be a day full of surprises. There will be attacks by several riders. Some of them will form a leading group called the breakaway. They will stay away for a long time. However the bunch will come back towards the end. A sprinter will win the sprint.
These are shocking predictions, but I believe such events are not unheard of. It could happen. :)
 
Dec 31, 2017
464
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Re:

Cookster15 said:
Since this one comes just before four consecutive hilly/mountain stages (six if we don't consider the rest day), I can understand that this stage is easy.
Thanks Vancouver for at least providing a feasible explanation for this stage. It still does not make it any easier to endure.Oh well its stage 11 and the real Giro starts tomorrow at last.

Maybe the slight uphill ending could help Caleb Ewan?
not enough to make a real difference i think
 
Dec 31, 2017
464
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2,310
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johnymax said:
The wait is almost over. Just one more day. C'mon cycling fans all over the World, stay strong. It'll be worth.
It wasn't all that bad until those two days, to be honest. TDF kinda have taught us for the flat first week and it wasn't all that flat. Also two ITT provided GC racing and Tom's drama as well. But this two pancake flat stages were unnecesary, if one of them were for puncheurs it would be better.
 
Re: Re:

repre said:
johnymax said:
The wait is almost over. Just one more day. C'mon cycling fans all over the World, stay strong. It'll be worth.
It wasn't all that bad until those two days, to be honest. TDF kinda have taught us for the flat first week and it wasn't all that flat. Also two ITT provided GC racing and Tom's drama as well. But this two pancake flat stages were unnecesary, if one of them were for puncheurs it would be better.
These two stages are like a recorded message while on hold, or waiting in the lobby for an appointment. You know you're going to wait, and that by itself is not bad. But a little "thank you for waiting" or "we appreciate your patience" just puts you over the edge into grumpy mode. It was okay the way it was, but drawing attention to it makes it worse.
 
Japanese Samurai in the break-away when, with 20 kilometers to go Simon becomes the new Boonen, attacks and opens up a sizable gap. But Roglic, who is the new Rominger after months as the new Landa reacts and time trials his way back. He takes with him Nibali, who is the new NIbali, much better than the old NIbali from last year when he looked like the new Van Garderen. Riders all over the road. Demare hangs on for dear life and makes it back to the front. The forum erupts: how could he do that? Did he cheat? French fans (always knowledgeable) rejoice: some claim that they knew all along hat he was the new Hinault. In the midst of this chaos no one pays attention to a surge by The Great Bauke Mollema; pulling a massive gear. Kirby squeals: he looks like the new Ullrich! No Sky rider in the mix, so many fans regret that there won't be a new Armstrong and a duel for the ages on the climb to the finish, dubbed the new Alpe d'Huez: 14 kilometers at 0.7%. One last turn and the final 3 kilometers are upon us as a group of fifteen riders comes together. Caleb Ewan wants to be the new Cavendish and feels good about his chances. Viviani may be the new Sercu (RIP champ) but he's not sure which wheel to take. So he follows Ackermann who may be the new Kittel but looks like the old Tutankhamen after his fall. Demare opens up the sprint with 450 meters to go, takes the advantage...then what?

Nono, Viviani, Caleb in the top-5.

I can't wait for this bike race to really begin.
 

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