A Shot Across the Bow ...

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May 11, 2009
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"Asked if he felt that the sporting movement was still best placed to impose sanctions on drug cheats, Garnier responded: “Today we can see all too well that the system isn’t working. If you look back, no major doping affair has been revealed by sport’s anti-doping system. It’s always the
police, the courts or customs who bring scandals to the surface
. And, in the case of the Armstrong affair, it was once again a federal agency, independent of the sporting movement, that revealed the affair. The sporting movement should not be trusted with the battle against doping.”

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/uci-and-wada-blamed-for-anti-doping-failure

An interesting read, and one that anyone who professes to care about doping in our sport should take note of.

The back and forth between WADA and the UCI has produced very little besides ... a back and forth between WADA and the UCI.

I for one, fail to understand why we are not reinforcing success and setting up an anti-doping 'police' force with all the same powers used to break up drug cartels in any other area of law enforcement.

I still cannot fathom why we are treating doping, in cycling, as a bureaucratic problem rather than a law enforcement problem. It makes no sense.
 

Dr. Maserati

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Jun 19, 2009
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There must have been a yellow sticky note left on a PC somewhere saying:
"this has been posted on Cyclingnews main page, start a thread in the Clinic straightaway - act all indignant and pretend this is some shocking revelation, then bring Bart a skinny latte"

Mountainman, (who like yourself is not a fan of Armstrong, and believes while it is right that LA got banned it is unjust that likable people only got banned for 6 months), already started a thread on the same issue 7 hours ago.
 
Nov 8, 2009
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gree0232 said:
I for one, fail to understand why we are not reinforcing success and setting up an anti-doping 'police' force with all the same powers used to break up drug cartels in any other area of law enforcement.
The only scenario I can see this happening in is if it becomes financially beneficial, i.e. when the extent of drug use becomes so widely known amongst the public that they stop watching cycling and other drug-riddled sports.

EDIT: If this was the case, the UCI would clean up cycling properly anyway, so...

What factors do you see as adequate motivation for the authorities to make this happen, that would lead to you failing to understand why it hasn't happened? As is alluded to in the article, there has long been enough evidence to clean up cycling, but due to the politics / money involved it hasn't happened.
 
Oct 4, 2011
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gree0232 said:
"Asked if he felt that the sporting movement was still best placed to impose sanctions on drug cheats, Garnier responded: “Today we can see all too well that the system isn’t working. If you look back, no major doping affair has been revealed by sport’s anti-doping system. It’s always the
police, the courts or customs who bring scandals to the surface
. And, in the case of the Armstrong affair, it was once again a federal agency, independent of the sporting movement, that revealed the affair. The sporting movement should not be trusted with the battle against doping.”

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/uci-and-wada-blamed-for-anti-doping-failure

An interesting read, and one that anyone who professes to care about doping in our sport should take note of.

The back and forth between WADA and the UCI has produced very little besides ... a back and forth between WADA and the UCI.

I for one, fail to understand why we are not reinforcing success and setting up an anti-doping 'police' force with all the same powers used to break up drug cartels in any other area of law enforcement.

I still cannot fathom why we are treating doping, in cycling, as a bureaucratic problem rather than a law enforcement problem. It makes no sense.
Really ? You fail to understand why we dont set up the doping police ? Would you like to expand on that idea so I can have a good laugh over dinner.
 
Sep 5, 2009
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What is the opening poster on?

The vast majority of of countries that are represented in the UCI are overtly corrupt at all levels of government including law enforcement agencies and, in a lot of cases, the supposedly independent judiciaries.

If sporting doping detection and enforcement were (impossibly) transferred to the national jurisdictions and required the introduction of local legislation there would be a mass exodus of pro riders taking up residence in third world banana republics.

Armstrong escaped the clutches of US law enforcement agencies by allegedly buying influence through Livestrong donations and instructing influential lawyers with connections.

Just imagine the processes in countries with lesser accountability and transparency.
 
May 11, 2009
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Bobby700c said:
The only scenario I can see this happening in is if it becomes financially beneficial, i.e. when the extent of drug use becomes so widely known amongst the public that they stop watching cycling and other drug-riddled sports.

EDIT: If this was the case, the UCI would clean up cycling properly anyway, so...

What factors do you see as adequate motivation for the authorities to make this happen, that would lead to you failing to understand why it hasn't happened? As is alluded to in the article, there has long been enough evidence to clean up cycling, but due to the politics / money involved it hasn't happened.
A fail to see how a steady string of scandals from Festina, Marco Pantani scandal, Operation Puerto, Austrian Blood Doping, Italian Investigations, Lance Armstrong, with more coming apparently ...

And the substance of the article is correct, WADA and the UCI are clearly not up to task. All these revelations come as a result of police investigations.

Is there any reason to continue these uninterrupted series of scandals to continue erupting? Might there be a profit in transparently avoiding these things?
 
May 11, 2009
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Velodude said:
What is the opening poster on?

The vast majority of of countries that are represented in the UCI are overtly corrupt at all levels of government including law enforcement agencies and, in a lot of cases, the supposedly independent judiciaries.

If sporting doping detection and enforcement were (impossibly) transferred to the national jurisdictions and required the introduction of local legislation there would be a mass exodus of pro riders taking up residence in third world banana republics.

Armstrong escaped the clutches of US law enforcement agencies by allegedly buying influence through Livestrong donations and instructing influential lawyers with connections.

Just imagine the processes in countries with lesser accountability and transparency.
Well, I guess we have an excuse in hand to do absolutely nothing. Everything is corrupt ... including the processes that clearly brought these issues to life provably.

Its smoking dope to think that we should reinforce these rather than continued ineptitude and failure .. because everyone is corrupt, including those who brought these scandals to light? Makes perfect sense.

You really think Columbian Drug cartels didn't do the same things that you allege here? Including murder people who got in their way? And yet we are able to bust up those cartels in the middle of a bloody civil war.

Clearly the sporting problem is MUCH worse that FARC and the Medellin Cartel :roll:

What we really need is **** Pound and Hein Verbruggen publically going after each others agents and questioning each others representatives ... that'll fix doping.

And anyone who thinks otherwise just must be smocking crack, eh?
 
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