Acceptable to wear OLD team kits?

Rule #17 // Team kit is for members of the team.
Wearing Pro team kit is also questionable if you’re not paid to wear it. If you must fly the colors of Pro teams, all garments should match perfectly, i.e no Mapei jersey with Kelme shorts and Telekom socks.
 
Feb 23, 2014
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Why are professional team kits sold to the public if it's not alright to wear them? I personally don't get the fuss. IMO it's fine to wear a team kit, old or new.
 
Jun 10, 2013
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Jspear said:
Why are professional team kits sold to the public if it's not alright to wear them? I personally don't get the fuss. IMO it's fine to wear a team kit, old or new.
It's because it's associated with freds, hubbards, you name it. People new to cycling who, from dealing with other sports, feel the need to relate to a team. Sometimes it's also seen as someone showing excessive signs of fanboyism towards a rider of a certain team (for instance Fleur in a Saxo jersey :p ), or sunday riders pretending to be who they're not. It's also not very useful because if you want to enter some kind of race, from a crit to a medio/granfondo, you're not allowed to wear jerseys/bibs from a pro team still in the scene or whose sponsors still exist. I won't say I have a beef with it, I sometimes still use my Efapel jersey from the year of David Blanco, but that's about it. Otherwise my minimalistic Decathlon kit does the trick.
 
Knock yourself out. I've always thought that classic kits are cool and can mark you out as someone who appreciates the history of the sport. I have an 80's design Puegeot kit I wear from time to time. Not sure if it's genuine but it looks good, fits well and gets comments. A friend has an early Fassa Bortolo kit that's the same.

As for current kits, I'd rather wear my club/LBS kit and give them support but if you like a current team kit, go for it I guess.
 
Aug 6, 2011
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Those rules are just there so some people can feel smugly superior over other cyclists they see as being part of the lesser group, the "casuals", "posers" or otherwise to-be-despised individuals who should not be on bikes. With such low entry requirements, anyone can get on a bike, you need some kind of ingroup-outgroup categorization to be able to distinguish yourself from the pack of simpletons.

Wait, I should probably edit this in:

Disclaimer: Don't take this post too serious, it's just my way to feel smugly superior over people who I feel are feeling smugly superior over others.
 
Re:

WillemS said:
Those rules are just there so some people can feel smugly superior over other cyclists they see as being part of lesser group, the "casuals", "poser" or otherwise to-be-despised individuals who should not be on bikes. With such low entry requirements, anyone can get on a bike, you need some kind of ingroup-outgroup categorization to be able to distinguish yourself from the pack of simpletons.

Wait, I should probably edit this in:

Disclaimer: Don't take this post too serious, it's just my way to feel smugly superior over people who I feel are feeling smugly superior over others.
Cycling culture is the worst. All those rules that are semi tongue in cheek but secretly oh so serious make me cringe.
 
Aug 6, 2011
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Arnout said:
Cycling culture is the worst. All those rules that are semi tongue in cheek but secretly oh so serious make me cringe.
At a local cycling event, I once observed a grown man on a bike talking to/insulting a boy* (eleven/twelve years of age?) in a world champion's kit saying the boy should not wear that and should have respect for that jersey and the "rightful" wearer. The terms the "grown" man used were a lot less respectful, though. Luckily the father of the boy just said something like "leave him alone", turned around and walked away.

*) They were totally unrelated/total strangers, as far as I could tell. The best part about it was that the man was obviously intoxicated, but still astride his mid-life crisis Pinarello (he did not really look like a "serious" cyclists).
 
Jun 10, 2013
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Re: Re:

WillemS said:
Arnout said:
Cycling culture is the worst. All those rules that are semi tongue in cheek but secretly oh so serious make me cringe.
At a local cycling event, I once observed a grown man on a bike talking to/insulting a boy* (eleven/twelve years of age?) in a world champion's kit saying the boy should not wear that and should have respect for that jersey and the "rightful" wearer. The terms the "grown" man used were a lot less respectful, though. Luckily the father of the boy just said something like "leave him alone", turned around and walked away.

*) They were totally unrelated/total strangers, as far as I could tell. The best part about it was that the man was obviously intoxicated, but still astride his mid-life crisis Pinarello (he did not really look like a "serious" cyclists).
Well, that's probably a former hubbard who had a hard time himself. Most cyclists I ride with don't like team kits but would never harass a child either. I think the father was very tolerant in that situation.
 
I still wear fluorescent yellow, though that might have to change. Shouted a greeting at someone this week and she gave me a very shifty look. Told me later she thought I was the community policeman :(
 
http://forum.cyclingnews.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=8087 Thread: "Should you wear team kits?"

Not fussed... I use some for commuting or weekend rides.
Although, I do draw the line at uspostal/disco/radioshack/trek...

I'd never turn up to a race in one though. In fact a local road race here states that if you turn up in pro team kit, then you can only race in A-Elite. It's club kit or completely inconspicuous kit (ie; black bibs/bland generic jersey)...
Funny story though - a guy rocked up to our monthly road race in full HTC kit a few years ago. Should have heard all the whispered "what a tool" type comments. That was until people realised it was Mark Renshaw that had rolled in.
 
Re:

Archibald said:
http://forum.cyclingnews.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=8087 Thread: "Should you wear team kits?"

Not fussed... I use some for commuting or weekend rides.
Although, I do draw the line at uspostal/disco/radioshack/trek...

I'd never turn up to a race in one though. In fact a local road race here states that if you turn up in pro team kit, then you can only race in A-Elite. It's club kit or completely inconspicuous kit (ie; black bibs/bland generic jersey)...
Funny story though - a guy rocked up to our monthly road race in full HTC kit a few years ago. Should have heard all the whispered "what a tool" type comments. That was until people realised it was Mark Renshaw that had rolled in.
Nice! Budget Forklifts and Drapac have a fair few riders based here in Brisbane, also Jay McCarthy and Michael Hepburn are locals as well. You can usually tell new racers or guys from out of town when they turn up to a Saturday morning criterium over the summer and people start making comments :D
 
Feb 23, 2014
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Archibald said:
http://forum.cyclingnews.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=8087 Thread: "Should you wear team kits?"

Not fussed... I use some for commuting or weekend rides.
Although, I do draw the line at uspostal/disco/radioshack/trek...

I'd never turn up to a race in one though. In fact a local road race here states that if you turn up in pro team kit, then you can only race in A-Elite. It's club kit or completely inconspicuous kit (ie; black bibs/bland generic jersey)...
Funny story though - a guy rocked up to our monthly road race in full HTC kit a few years ago. Should have heard all the whispered "what a tool" type comments. That was until people realised it was Mark Renshaw that had rolled in.
:D Nice!
 
Jan 10, 2010
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the rules are very funny

not to be taken too seriously though

some nice guidelines in there

mtb shorts on road bikes with road riding jersey
is best avoided

as is full team sky kit on your bunch ride
 
What a cool thread! I love the Mark Renshaw story :D . True that a mix of different teams' clothing would raise my eyebrows. Or a fat guy wearing the TdF polka dot jersey. Yet, if it makes him happy, who am I to judge? I have looked up Molteni stuff, WC jersey no less :cool: , thinking that wearing Eddy's gear would push me to live up to it, ride even harder...
 
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Arnout said:
Is it unacceptable to wear new ones? I like my clothes to be free of holes to be honest.
You can get non-team cycling kits. Completely neutral kits that aren't made by a team.
I'm also pretty certain it would be possible to get a new from an old team, if that made sense...


Jspear said:
Why are professional team kits sold to the public if it's not alright to wear them? I personally don't get the fuss. IMO it's fine to wear a team kit, old or new.
Coz the teams want to make money.
 
In the Netherlands it is quite normal to see cyclist in a Rabobank jersey or other team clothes. At least from my memory.

I got myself a black-fuchsia Nalini vintage jersey this spring, that I just found super fancy.^^

I guess it ain't no problem at all to wear a Carrera Jeans or Mercatone Uno outfit to appreciate the pirate, especially in Italy???
 
Jan 10, 2010
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Re: Re:

RedheadDane said:
Arnout said:
Is it unacceptable to wear new ones? I like my clothes to be free of holes to be honest.
You can get non-team cycling kits. Completely neutral kits that aren't made by a team.
I'm also pretty certain it would be possible to get a new from an old team, if that made sense...


Jspear said:
Why are professional team kits sold to the public if it's not alright to wear them? I personally don't get the fuss. IMO it's fine to wear a team kit, old or new.
Coz the teams want to make money.

perhaps

would you turn up to your weekly indoor soccer game

in full barcelona fc kit

perhaps

old skool retro is cool

ofc always imho

i get plenty of comments when i'm rockin my old 7 / eleven jersey
 

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