Bach Weakening WADA

http://www.3wiresports.com/2013/11/03/a-stealth-olympic-summit/

At the same time, it calls for WADA to become more of a “service organization,” reflecting tensions with some international sports federations, who have suggested that the agency has been telling them what to do instead of serving their needs.

This suggests Reedie is going to be very, very quiet compared to WADA's previous leaders.

Ferrari/Fuentes are open for business. Again!

Also interesting: SportAccord president is selling... " a “Unified World Championships” that would feature 90-plus sports all going on at the same time."
 
Aug 18, 2012
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This bit gave me hope.

"Whether this proves in the long run to actually be a good thing or not and whether or not this actually plays out, particularly with such real world challenges such as the testing of the Jamaican and Kenyan athletes now making headlines remains to be seen"

As well as the potential for media to look into why an epic scumbag like Hein Verbruggen managed to become such a high profile player in the IOC.
 
Feb 19, 2013
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DirtyWorks said:
This suggests Reedie is going to be very, very quiet compared to WADA's previous leaders.
What else do we know about Reedie that is relevant to this question? I note from his IOC profile that he's been a 'Member of [the] Executive Committee' at WADA since 1999. Is there any way to find out what he's actually done in that time?
 
Feb 19, 2013
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I guess we'll have more to go on when we find out what, if anything, happens regarding JADCO.

At least there's nothing obviously rotten with him, unlike many other IOC personalities (as you pointed out). But I take your point: 'close to the federations' could mean various things, not all of them good.
 
Sep 29, 2012
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Had not seen this mentioned before:

UCI head: Cookson, from GB
WADA head: Reedie, from GB
IOC Vice president: Reedie, from GB
 
May 19, 2010
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Reedie is fed up with the blood and urine testing and wants a doping scanner:

I don't know what will work, but if we had a a fund of up to 100 millions for such research we could achive quite expensive technological development. I'm looking for the scientist who says that we no longer need to test blood or urine, but has a much better idea. You know the scanners at airports that reveal if are bringing a gun? Could someone just say that we now have the technology to show the last time an athlete took a dose of steroids?

- I do not have the answer, but it's time to think outside the box, says Reedle.
http://www.dagbladet.no/2014/11/14/sport/doping/wada/craig_reedie/36232865/ (Norwegian)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hccf-8BYaDg (Swedish)
 
May 26, 2010
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Feb 28, 2010
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neineinei said:
Reedie is fed up with the blood and urine testing and wants a doping scanner:



http://www.dagbladet.no/2014/11/14/sport/doping/wada/craig_reedie/36232865/ (Norwegian)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hccf-8BYaDg (Swedish)
Where did the Reedie quote come from? The original article appears to have come from The Scotsman and reads:

`Sir Craig Reedie believes that the International Olympic Committee is on the way to raising a fighting fund of $14 million (£8.8m) for the war on doping.

The former chairman of the British Olympic Association now sits on the IOC's executive board and says greater financial resources are pivotal to beating the drug cheats.

Reedie said the IOC's German president Thomas Bach had produced two $10m funds (£6m) designed to deal with doping matters and manipulation or match-fixing in sport, but he expects those figures to be surpassed after pledges of financial support from individual nations.

The 73-year-old Scot said Turkey's cheque had already been cashed by the IOC and he believes other pledges will soon turn into hard cash for their special anti-doping reserve fund.

"Turkey's money is in the bank and we have guarantees from China, the United States, Saudi Arabia, Ivory Coast and New Zealand," Reedie said. "I'm also sure Japan and Korea will commit so I'm hopeful we might raise $5-6m which means we'll get $5-6m guaranteed by the IOC.

"There's a lot of very advanced thinking out there using technology against doping and, hopefully, we can use that. Would that work? I don't know, but if we have a fund of $12-14m we could have quite expensive research.

"I'm looking for the scientist who says we don't have to test for urine or blood any more and has got a much better idea. You know that machine you go through at the airport which says you've got a gun. Well, could someone say we've got that technology to show the last time an athlete took a dose of steroids? I don't know that answer but what we do need is to think outside the box and something easier would be helpful."

Reedie says there is a fierce determination among athletes to clean up sport but admits the IOC needs more assistance from governments around the world. He believes great strides have been taken in this area by UNESCO's anti-doping convention which 100 countries signed up to and will seek nations to implement drug legislation, particularly on illegal substances.

"When we were looking at the terms of the new [IOC anti-doping] code in Johannesburg there were absolutely outstanding contributions from leading athletes," Reedie said. "They all said: 'Please, please increase the sanctions, we do not want unclean athletes competing'.

"They thought it was great that we're protecting the clean athlete and I think that philosophy is right.

"But governments must have the will to tackle the problem and introduce legislation. Unfortunately it's not a high enough priority for them and one of the toughest jobs I have is to [get them to] take it seriously."'
 
Mar 27, 2014
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I love this

Yes the athletes are all pleading with the authorities to catch the cheats and increase the bans

As long as it isn't them that get caught of course, Then they get a smaller field of equals to have to beat and their winning margins go up.

Brilliant.

It is like when the government have a gun and knife amnesty

All the criminals are outside the police station taking a note of all those handing in their weapons and will be subsequently easy targets for the foreseeable future. Brilliant plan !!!
 
May 19, 2010
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Here is an older Norwegian interview with Reedie, from February.

http://www.vg.no/sport/doping/slik-svarer-wada-presidenten-om-norsk-dopingbok/a/10121619/

Journalist Anders K. Christiansen, one of the journalists Hushovd blacklisted) : It seems as if one can dope without any risk in large parts of Africa, Asia and South America?

Reedie: That's not true. Last week I was in Kuwait and met the 15 so-called "regional" anti-doping agencies. They represented 123 countries worldwide. The system may not be as good as the national doping agency in England, I admit, but many countries covered by the regional agencies.

VG-Anders: An example: The regional bureaus in Africa, Zone 2 and 3 together, took a total of 20 urine samples during the whole of 2012. What do you think about that number?

Reedie: We need to improve. But to say that there are none, are completely wrong. It is important to look at the development.

VG-Anders: However, 20 urine samples of a number of countries in Africa are as tantamount to nothing?

Reedie: It isn't much. But to say "nothing" is wrong.
When there were taken only 20 urine samples by Regional Anti doping agency Africa zone 2 and 3 (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Côte d'Ivoire, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Niger, Senegal and Togo) in all of 2012, it is important to point out that 20 is not nothing.

The 72-year-old is newly elected president of Wada, and central to the IOC.

He points to the number of tests during the Olympics as an example of the willingness to catch the cheater. It is not necessarily easy to escape as cheater in Sochi, if we are to believe the Scot:

- The efforts by the IOC and Wada ahead of the Olympics in London were working: Many athletes never showed up, and that's good. There were both tested in advance of the Games, and it was taken 5,400 tests during the Olympics. Few of them were positive. The same is happening now: During the Olympic Games in Sochi will be taken in 2500 doping tests, says Reedie.

VG-Anders: Michael Rasmussen tells me the same as others also are saying, that cheaters stop doping in time for the Olympics, so that substances can not be traced. Then thousands of tests during Olympics aren't of any use?

Reedie When it comes to cycling, I think we should wait and see what the independent investigation of UCI will find, before I say anything.
The question was about the testing, not cycling. Cyclists might be cunning, but probably not more so than other athletes, but they deifinatly seems to be smarter than the average anti-doping official.

VG-Anders: Drange points out that there has been talk of blood profile programs since the 90s, but it was not in place until 2009. Why did take such a long time?

Reedie: Wada has worked long on blood profiles and technical documents to supportthe blood passport system. But why it has taken so long, it's hard me to say here I sit now. If nothing happened until 2009, I can understand some frustration, says Reedie VG.
Reedie, the head of WADA, doesn't know that the biological passport was introduced in 2009.
 
Re:

neineinei said:
Reedie, the head of WADA, doesn't know that the biological passport was introduced in 2009.
Another great post. Thank you neineinei.

Just an update on this, I think Reedie's apointment is beginning to have a public impact on the image of WADA when the official WADA feed attributes some quotes to Reedie.

Dr. Veloclinic's post is sufficient: http://veloclinic.tumblr.com/post/117791738283/wada-president-shows-embarrassingly-lack-of

Seriously bad stuff. People actually interested in enforcing anti-doping must be cringing.

https://twitter.com/wada_ama
 
Mar 13, 2009
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Head of WADA always been a political appointment. The last one John Fahey from Australia would not have had any ideas either.
 
May 19, 2010
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Mads Drange has a short and snarky little story about his first and only meet with Fahey in his book.

"When everyone had sat down after supplying themselves from the buffet, I asked what he thought about several federations running their own race when it came to blood testing and blood profiles, and not making the data available to WADA, as regulations required.
"Well," said Fahey. "I was not aware of that."
Full stop.

Then he started a half-hour discourse on the differences in business class and first class on international flights. I believe he ultimately concluded that Thai Airways had the best first class compartments."
 
Sep 29, 2012
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The recent WADA shindigs are all very top notch full catered affairs. Wouldn't surprise me to discover it's more junket than anti-doping.
 

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