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Chodroff

Oct 29, 2009
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Wow, that didn't take long! Electronic evidence linking him to Papp's site? That is pretty damning evidence, so it's no suprise he fessed up. That's actually nice to see - someone taking responsibility for their actions. I wonder if that will lead to the other two dozen or so athletes who are involved in this USADA investigation to admit to their dpoing.
 
Apr 26, 2010
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On average, only a minority admits to doping, something around a third I think. So we'll have to see.
But yes indeed, he got taken pretty badly. But apparently he had already decided to quit procycling! Which is something I doubt. He was probably notified first or got word out, and quickly he decided he would stop and confess, trying to quit "honourably", for as far doping can be honourable.
 
Jun 19, 2009
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Vonn Brinkman said:
On average, only a minority admits to doping, something around a third I think. So we'll have to see.
But yes indeed, he got taken pretty badly. But apparently he had already decided to quit procycling! Which is something I doubt. He was probably notified first or got word out, and quickly he decided he would stop and confess, trying to quit "honourably", for as far doping can be honourable.

Chodroff even said "If you get caught..." so much for an honorable disclosure.
 
Aug 10, 2009
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Vonn Brinkman said:
On average, only a minority admits to doping, something around a third I think. So we'll have to see.
But yes indeed, he got taken pretty badly. But apparently he had already decided to quit procycling! Which is something I doubt. He was probably notified first or got word out, and quickly he decided he would stop and confess, trying to quit "honourably", for as far doping can be honourable.

Have you seen Chodroff race? I have a few times over the past few seasons and to be honest I remember him barely even finishing races, forget doing well. This year at the Tour of California he was dropped and abandoned on stage 1, at Nature Valley he would be dropped in the first 3-7 laps of the criteriums - he was time cut on stage 3 I think.

I believe he's being honest saying he wasn't going to race next year. Not anything to do with doping, rather he just wasn't that good and I doubt he was offered a contract.

I've heard he had a big big engine, but he simply had no technical ability to ride his bike in a pack. I think that is a pretty important skill for a professional cyclist. Maybe after 2 yrs on the US domestic pro scene getting constantly dropped made him realize he just wasn't going to get it.

Is there a drug that can make you a better bike handler? Chodroff should have taken that one.
 
Aug 26, 2009
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Chodroff did have a big engine (whether enhanced or not). Talking to him after the Valley of the Sun TT that he won, he said he averaged between 430 and 440 watts for almost 30 minutes. The comment about his inability to handle a bike is completely correct.
 
zwiebel2004 said:
Chodroff did have a big engine (whether enhanced or not). Talking to him after the Valley of the Sun TT that he won, he said he averaged between 430 and 440 watts for almost 30 minutes. The comment about his inability to handle a bike is completely correct.

In my experience there are a fair number of "elite" riders that fall into this category. I was always shocked in stage race opening TT's how well lots of guys would ride...then get dropped the next day like a stone. This is in the US btw. I didn't see it as much in other countries I raced. In fact...almost never.
 
Hairy Wheels said:
In my experience there are a fair number of "elite" riders that fall into this category. I was always shocked in stage race opening TT's how well lots of guys would ride...then get dropped the next day like a stone. This is in the US btw. I didn't see it as much in other countries I raced. In fact...almost never.
Why is that? Is it because they're so tense the whole time they burn twice as much energy as anyone who can actually handle their bikes?
 
hrotha said:
Why is that? Is it because they're so tense the whole time they burn twice as much energy as anyone who can actually handle their bikes?

Agree with you. I sometimes think that these guys also focused way to much on the TT, ignoring the many demands that a real road race places on you.
 
Aug 13, 2009
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ergmonkey said:
Chodroff CV in brief:

-US domestic pro cyclist
-Yale rower
-doper
-mediocre at all of the above

And not the smartest tool in the shed.....the dude used his Yale.edu email address to order the dope and had it shipped to his parents house. :rolleyes:
 
Mar 13, 2009
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hrotha said:
Why is that? Is it because they're so tense the whole time they burn twice as much energy as anyone who can actually handle their bikes?

Yup...wrong side of the group, letting gaps open, touching brakes, over-acccelerating.

It all adds up!
 
Apr 9, 2009
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So apparently this guy was a cat 3 in 2007 when he first purchased epo, then got a pro contract with OUCH two years later? Yowza. Not sure if this will deter or encourage other riders tempted to get on the juice.
 
May 6, 2009
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Race Radio said:
And not the smartest tool in the shed.....the dude used his Yale.edu email address to order the dope and had it shipped to his parents house. :rolleyes:

So a daddy's boy who has never done an honest day's work in his life?
 
Apr 29, 2010
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He wants to be a doctor now. Great. If he ends up with any criminal drug charges he will be ineligible for any federal student loans here in the US.
 
Jun 18, 2009
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shouldawouldacoulda said:
I've heard he had a big big engine, but he simply had no technical ability to ride his bike in a pack. I think that is a pretty important skill for a professional cyclist. Maybe after 2 yrs on the US domestic pro scene getting constantly dropped made him realize he just wasn't going to get it.

Is there a drug that can make you a better bike handler? Chodroff should have taken that one.

This is spot on. BMC had a guy with an even bigger engine and worse pack-handling skills, and he ended up quitting as well.

On Chodroff, this is as depressing as it gets, for me at least. Doping your way from a mediocre Cat 3 to Elite TT Champion, so you can get a pro contract and get dropped in every race? This is what it's come to?

At least he didn't pull a Phil Zajicek, so I'll give him credit for that at least.