Chris Hoy - hard work and dreaming big

Jul 21, 2012
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http://www1.skysports.com/scholarships/news/23850/9510151/hoy-and-mighty

Sir Chris Hoy spoke to our Sky Academy Sports Scholars about how he achieved his dream of becoming Olympic champion through hard work, patience and belief...
thats how you do it kids..

The person Hoy credits with helping him to be at his optimum mentally each time he competed is psychologist Dr Steve Peters, who worked with British Cycling while the Scot was at the peak of his powers.

However, when it comes to the person he believes most helped him to become an Olympic champion, there is no hesitation as he names Shane Sutton. The Australian was recently promoted to technical director at British Cycling, but in Hoy’s time he held the position of head coach, and was unique in the way he went about fulfilling that role according to Hoy.
“His attention detail is incredible, he demands 100 per cent of you - that is all he wants. If you are giving your best, truly your best, not 99.9 per cent but 100 per cent in every second, then he will support you and he will back you, but if he thinks you’re not doing that then he will be all over you
Wow truly revolutionary.. The first coach in history that thought about motivating his athletes.
 
May 26, 2010
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Those legs are achieved with bread, water, the right pillows, no shaking hands, no nutella, no sunbathing, no beer and some training.....
 
Aug 31, 2012
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I always cringe when success (of any sort) is attributed first and foremost to hard work. Rarely, if ever true.
 
Dec 13, 2012
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SeriousSam said:
I always cringe when success (of any sort) is attributed first and foremost to hard work. Rarely, if ever true.
So a regular guy who has a full time job, family etc who for example runs a marathon in 3 hours and attributes it to hard work - that would make you cringe? Seems a strange attitude to have.
 
Sep 14, 2011
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Looking forward to seeing what evidence people can dig up on Hoy. Always looks like your typical evil Brit doper to me.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Bernie's eyesore said:
Looking forward to seeing what evidence people can dig up on Hoy. Always looks like your typical evil Brit doper to me.
yeah, matt brammeier is probably right. they only dope in kazachstan.
 
sniper said:
Struggling to suppress a giggle.

Real bikes? Whoa. Marginal gains lookout.

SeriousSam said:
I always cringe when success (of any sort) is attributed first and foremost to hard work. Rarely, if ever true.
Hopefully not always. If frequently, I would agree with you.

The problem with many folks who make statement like this is that they don't have the intelligence that the guy who said this:

Genius is 1% talent and 99% percent hard work

He actually worked hard.

More often, those who employ the statement use it as a shield to hide the real source of success, that being either luck or, in cycling, doping methods.

Dave.
 
Nov 14, 2013
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Do you think the track events lend themselves to more "genetic advantage" and less doping advantage than road? By this I mean there is more of a flat bell curve to Sprint power than endurance ie some people's make up just make them good sprinters where the endurance bell curve is more flat so everybody is more similar to a degree in trainability? Also the doping advantage to endurance has much more advantage than to power?
 
Mar 13, 2009
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ralphbert said:
Do you think the track events lend themselves to more "genetic advantage" and less doping advantage than road? By this I mean there is more of a flat bell curve to Sprint power than endurance ie some people's make up just make them good sprinters where the endurance bell curve is more flat so everybody is more similar to a degree in trainability? Also the doping advantage to endurance has much more advantage than to power?
think the resources make the most difference. to have full time track athletes on a comfortable stipend is only afforded to few individuals, and one nation's team that is comprised of some of those individuals.

that makes the difference. a little like the Paralympics where most disciplines require some prosthetic or a training ground like a pool. This rules out 90% of other athletes with a disability to compete on equal terms. Which is a bit ironic
 
ralphbert said:
Do you think the track events lend themselves to more "genetic advantage" and less doping advantage than road? By this I mean there is more of a flat bell curve to Sprint power than endurance ie some people's make up just make them good sprinters where the endurance bell curve is more flat so everybody is more similar to a degree in trainability? Also the doping advantage to endurance has much more advantage than to power?
Ben Johnson, Linford Christie and Carl Lewis disagree with you. Same with Ray Stewart, Desai Williams and Dennis Mitchell.

Doping was so prevalent in the sport that six of the eight finalists that lined up on that September day in Seoul would fail drugs tests themselves or implicated in their use during their careers, including Lewis and Christie. As the writer Richard Moore describes in his new book on the 100m final in Seoul, it was the "Dirtiest Race in History."

Pretty sure Victor Conte, Marion Jones or Justin Gatlin don't agree with you either.

Notably, it is pretty rare for any of these people to agree with each other on anything. But, you may have been successful.

Just saying.

Dave.
 
May 24, 2011
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D-Queued said:
Ben Johnson, Linford Christie and Carl Lewis disagree with you. Same with Ray Stewart, Desai Williams and Dennis Mitchell.

Doping was so prevalent in the sport that six of the eight finalists that lined up on that September day in Seoul would fail drugs tests themselves or implicated in their use during their careers, including Lewis and Christie. As the writer Richard Moore describes in his new book on the 100m final in Seoul, it was the "Dirtiest Race in History."

Pretty sure Victor Conte, Marion Jones or Justin Gatlin don't agree with you either.

Notably, it is pretty rare for any of these people to agree with each other on anything. But, you may have been successful.

Just saying.

Dave.
Got it. What we're doing here is listing sportspeople from another era, even another sport, where testing was poorer than it is today, and use it as evidence that a cyclist who's never tested positive under much striker doping controls must have been on the juice.
That's a very Clinic way of thinking.

About Hoy? Who knows? Great career results for sure, but any scrap of evidence from the doubters would be nice.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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The Tibetan Hat said:
Got it. What we're doing here is listing sportspeople from another era, even another sport, where testing was poorer than it is today, and use it as evidence that a cyclist who's never tested positive under much striker doping controls must have been on the juice.
That's a very Clinic way of thinking.

About Hoy? Who knows? Great career results for sure, but any scrap of evidence from the doubters would be nice.
your talk of 'evidence' is a strawman.
as for the quality of testing in different eras, you conveniently forget that if the testing has gotten X times better, the doping methods to evade the testing have gotten X square times better.
there's just a tad bit more money invested in doping than in antidoping.
 
Mar 13, 2009
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The Tibetan Hat said:
Got it. What we're doing here is listing sportspeople from another era, even another sport, where testing was poorer than it is today, and use it as evidence that a cyclist who's never tested positive under much striker doping controls must have been on the juice.
That's a very Clinic way of thinking.

About Hoy? Who knows? Great career results for sure, but any scrap of evidence from the doubters would be nice.
the evidence is olympic gold and a study of doping and its influences and a little bit of sociology and psychology.

If most are doing it and getting an advantage that cannot be neutralised, you expect these A Type psychology individuals to just say "stuff this, my morals are immaculate". I believe Yesalis and Hoberman have riffed on this.

The greatest evidence is the dovetail of i) the company they keep. re: podium at Olympics, and ii) the D-Q rule of doping's effect compared to marginal gains, ergo, how one cannot compete against contempories with this advantage
 
Mar 13, 2009
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sniper said:
your talk of 'evidence' is a strawman.
as for the quality of testing in different eras, you conveniently forget that if the testing has gotten X times better, the doping methods to evade the testing have gotten X square times better.
there's just a tad bit more money invested in doping than in antidoping.
#evidence = bastion of scoundrel

extraordinary allegations require extraordinary evidence. Carl Sagan b4 Prance StrongArm

oh how freud and bernarys would be laughing in their graves seeing how the people are such sheep.
 
Sep 14, 2011
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The Tibetan Hat said:
Got it. What we're doing here is listing sportspeople from another era, even another sport, where testing was poorer than it is today, and use it as evidence that a cyclist who's never tested positive under much striker doping controls must have been on the juice.
That's a very Clinic way of thinking.

About Hoy? Who knows? Great career results for sure, but any scrap of evidence from the doubters would be nice.
Hoy, in a speech to school children, told them of the value of hard work. What more proof do you need that he was a doper?
 
Feb 10, 2013
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Of course hard work isn't guaranteed success but without it I'd suggest there is a very limited chances of succeeding.

The key to success is where you focus that hard work. And sadly for many the answer is PEDs
 
Sep 14, 2011
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The charge sheet so far against Hoy reads,

1. He works hard
2. He has never failed a test.
3. He has a coach

Surely someone can come up with more than this to pin down this evil fiend.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Bernie's eyesore said:
The charge sheet so far against Hoy reads,

1. He works hard
2. He has never failed a test.
3. He has a coach

Surely someone can come up with more than this to pin down this evil fiend.
evil fiend?
no need for strawmen.
 
Mar 13, 2009
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Bernie's eyesore said:
The charge sheet so far against Hoy reads,

1. He works hard
2. He has never failed a test.
3. He has a coach

Surely someone can come up with more than this to pin down this evil fiend.
cycling and gold medals at olympics is like track and field athletics and gold medals at olympics and is like swimming and gold medals at olympics. = the jan ullrich equation. 2 + 2 = 5.
 
Bernie's eyesore said:
Looking forward to seeing what evidence people can dig up on Hoy. Always looks like your typical evil Brit doper to me.

6 time olympic champion during the 2000's should on its own be enough for most people with any braincells whatsoever to have serious doubts. That's before considering that the sport is cycling, that he kept winning olympic golds into his late 30's and that his trainers were the current Sky lot.
 

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