Cycling records and statistics

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I have some interesting stats, it's about cycling biggest races, 10 of them (3 GT's, 5 Monuments and WC&OG RR):

Number of wins:
33 - Eddy Merckx
17 - Fausto Coppi
16 - Bernard Hinault
14 - Alfredo Binda
12 - Gino Bartali
11 - Costante Girardengo
Roger De Vlaeminck
10 - Rik Van Looy
Felice Gimondi
Sean Kelly
9 - Jacques Anquetil
8 - Rik Van Steenbergen
Louison Bobet
Francesco Moser
Paolo Bettini
Tom Boonen
7 - Henri Pelissier
Moreno Argentin
Miguel Indurain
Johan Museeuw
Alberto Contador
Fabian Cancellara
Vincenzo Nibali
Chris Froome
6 - Gaetano Belloni
Giovanni Brunero
Fiorenzo Magni
Fred De Bruyne
Tony Rominger
Oscar Freire
Alejandro Valverde
Philippe Gilbert
5 - Jan Raas
Hennie Kuiper
Giuseppe Saronni
Greg Lemond
Laurent Fignon
Gianni Bugno
Michele Bartoli
Peter Sagan


Number of podiums:
45 - Eddy Merckx
26 - Alejandro Valverde
25 - Fausto Coppi
Felice Gimondi
24 - Francesco Moser
23 - Gino Bartali
22 - Roger De Vlaeminck
21 - Bernard Hinault
20 - Alfredo Binda
19 - Costante Girardengo
Rik Van Looy
Raymond Poulidor
Sean Kelly


Top 10 placings:
67 - Eddy Merckx
43 - Felice Gimondi
Francesco Moser
Alejandro Valverde
42 - Raymond Poulidor
Roger De Vlaeminck
Sean Kelly
40 - Gino Bartali
Pretty surprised at how low in the list the current guys are especially Valverde.
Also great to see Seán up in the top 10the reason why me and so many in Ireland love cycling
 
Different characteristics of races - a punchy finish in Ans vs flat finish before, Lombardia with a more difficult finale instead of a flat finish
Yeah, and Milan-San Remo didn't have a Poggio, and Cipressa, and Le Manie..., Trouee d'Arenberg became a part of Paris-Roubaix only in 1968, Koppenberg is introduced in 1976, I'm missing your point a bit... :confused_old:
 
Oct 26, 2020
85
201
880
Here is a list of riders ranked by number of consecutive years in which they have started at least one grand tour. Riders still active in bold.

It looks like Gilbert will become the sole holder of this record next week when he starts a grand tour for the 19th consecutive year.

18
Lucien Van Impe
George Hincapie
Matteo Tosatto
Sylvain Chavanel
Philippe Gilbert

17

Wladimiro Panizza
Roberto Conti
Gianni Faresin
Davide Bramati
Iñigo Cuesta
Stuart O'Grady
Jens Voigt *never raced Vuelta
Luis León Sánchez

16

Franco Bitossi *never raced Vuelta
Roberto Poggiali
Pierino Gavazzi *never raced Vuelta
Hennie Kuiper
Bruno Leali
Federico Echave
Mario Scirea
Mario Cipollini
Andrea Noè
Alessandro Spezialetti
Andreas Klöden
Bram Tankink
André Greipel
Imanol Erviti
Vincenzo Nibali

15

Raymond Poulidor
Sean Kelly
Guy Nulens
Guido Bontempi
Fabiano Fontanelli
Massimiliano Lelli
Alberto Elli
Viatcheslav Ekimov
Marc Wauters
Giuseppe Guerini
Erik Zabel
Marco Velo
José Vicente García Acosta *never raced Giro
Marzio Bruseghin
Samuel Sanchez
Manuel Quinziato
Thomas Voeckler
William Bonnet
Nicolas Roche
Dario Cataldo
 
Not sure if it fits anywhere, but I looked at some of the most insane schedules and 1996 Berzin comes to mind.

The raw number are already impressive, between the 8th of April and the 21st of July he had 70 race days, but that doesn't even tell the whole story:

Pais Vasco, 5 days with 2 half stages on the final day, finished 5th on the gc
Then a block of 5 one day races, with the first starting 2 days later. Klasika Primavera, FW, LBL, Appennino and the GP Argau
The day after Argau he starts Romandie, 6 days of racing and finished 6th on the gc
12 days later the Giro, 22 stages, 10th on the gc and he wins the long ITT before the final parade stage.
2 days after the Giro finishes he rides the Tour de Suisse, 10 stages. He wins both ITTs and finished 4th on the gc
9 days later he starts the Tour, 22 stages, where he wears the Yellow Jersey for 2 days and wins the Val d'Isere ITT before fading badly near the end and finishing 20th on the gc.

Besides the clinic related stuff it's no wonder that the guy faded badly in the Tour, that kind of schedule while riding all those stage races for the gc is totally mental. Puts all the talk of Berzin becoming lazy after winning the Giro in perspective...
 
Not sure if it fits anywhere, but I looked at some of the most insane schedules and 1996 Berzin comes to mind.

The raw number are already impressive, between the 8th of April and the 21st of July he had 70 race days, but that doesn't even tell the whole story:

Pais Vasco, 5 days with 2 half stages on the final day, finished 5th on the gc
Then a block of 5 one day races, with the first starting 2 days later. Klasika Primavera, FW, LBL, Appennino and the GP Argau
The day after Argau he starts Romandie, 6 days of racing and finished 6th on the gc
12 days later the Giro, 22 stages, 10th on the gc and he wins the long ITT before the final parade stage.
2 days after the Giro finishes he rides the Tour de Suisse, 10 stages. He wins both ITTs and finished 4th on the gc
9 days later he starts the Tour, 22 stages, where he wears the Yellow Jersey for 2 days and wins the Val d'Isere ITT before fading badly near the end and finishing 20th on the gc.

Besides the clinic related stuff it's no wonder that the guy faded badly in the Tour, that kind of schedule while riding all those stage races for the gc is totally mental. Puts all the talk of Berzin becoming lazy after winning the Giro in perspective...
Even Bilbao would be impressed by that schedule.
 
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