Cyclocross tire pressure

Jan 22, 2011
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I was watching the 2018 UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships and one of the female competitors said she was running her tire pressures at 15 psi (she decided against 14). Of course women are lighter than men so.....I assume the men run their tires at a significantly higher pressure. Does anyone know what the typical pressure was on race day?
Thanx in advance. I don't know anything about cyclocross except that it's crazy hard....unlike the tires ;) .
 
Starting point tends to be bodyweight ÷ 10, then add 5 (in pounds). Obviously, if riding clincher you'll need to add a few more on top.

So my guess would be the rider in question weighs about 100lbs.

1psi adjustment (either way) is significant.

Essentially, you aim to go as low as you can without grounding the tyre on the rim. or having a tub fold.
 
Jan 22, 2011
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Thanks!
The internet has her weight at around 123 lbs so other factors (the conditions, course etc) made her go lower than what would be deemed 'normal'.
 
Body weight and preference certainly play a part, but...
The surface/course plays a huge part in determining psi/bar. Is it sandy, muddy, hard, hard-slick, rocky, grass, fast, slow, combo...
The tire itself (casing, compound, volume) can also play some part.
The rim can also play a small part in the equation.
 
Re:

macbindle said:
Starting point tends to be bodyweight ÷ 10, then add 5 (in pounds). Obviously, if riding clincher you'll need to add a few more on top.

So my guess would be the rider in question weighs about 100lbs.

1psi adjustment (either way) is significant.

Essentially, you aim to go as low as you can without grounding the tyre on the rim. or having a tub fold.
This article goes a little further into what Macbindle was saying.
https://bikerumor.com/2017/01/03/wyman-method-setting-proper-race-tire-pressure-part-1/
Another thing is the tyres they choose. For instance a mud tyre could be ran at a slightly higher pressure, as there is more grip due to more/larger nobbles, than an intermediate tyre that has a less/smaller nobbles. Also, if the majority of the course is mud, but a reasonably long section has large stones or tarmac you then have to ask whether it is worth raising the pressure to avoid flats for the former and increase speed for the latter but reduce performance/grip for the rest of the course.
 
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