Drugs "A Factor in runner death"

Djave Bikinus

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Jan 29, 2013
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Yeah I read this too. Not an athlete, but somebody running the marathon to raise money for charity, so inadvertent 'doping' I suppose. The stuff was in a 'fat burning' drink. Just goes to show how careful pro athletes would have to be to avoid getting this **** in their systems
 
Jul 13, 2012
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Djave Bikinus said:
The stuff was in a 'fat burning' drink. Just goes to show how careful pro athletes would have to be to avoid getting this **** in their systems
No. It only shows what attitude some people have towards using drugs if they promise an enhancement in performance (note that MDAA was not illegal at the time, btw.).

No professional athlete would just take a "fat burning drink" without being absolutely sure about the ingredients.
 

Djave Bikinus

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Jan 29, 2013
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enCYCLOpedia said:
No. It only shows what attitude some people have towards using drugs if they promise an enhancement in performance (note that MDAA was not illegal at the time, btw.).
What makes you think she was looking for a performance enhancement? She might just have thought it would help her lose weight

No professional athlete would just take a "fat burning drink" without being absolutely sure about the ingredients.
Isn't that what I said?
 
enCYCLOpedia said:
No. It only shows what attitude some people have towards using drugs if they promise an enhancement in performance (note that MDAA was not illegal at the time, btw.).

No professional athlete would just take a "fat burning drink" without being absolutely sure about the ingredients.

When they say not illegal at the time, that is for the general public

It may still have been illegal for elite athletes, it is difficult to tell.
 
Jul 13, 2012
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Djave Bikinus said:
So are you saying she knew what was in her drink and was taking it to get a performance enhancement?
Obviously, I don't know her. But in all likelihood, she was taking the substance (putting it in her drink) to get a boost in performance, which is exactly what the label promises. Whether she knew that the active ingredient was 1,3-dimethylamylamine, I very much doubt. According to the BBC article, her boyfriend said:

"She said she would take one scoop in her water bottle. She said that if 'I hit a bit of [a] wall I will take it' "

In my opinion, taking something to help you through a bad patch in a race is performance enhancement (whether or not it actually worked is another matter).
 
Sep 13, 2010
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Djave Bikinus said:
What makes you think she was looking for a performance enhancement? She might just have thought it would help her lose weight
From BBC link above, did you even read it?:

"Mr van Herrewege told the inquest: "Claire ended up getting a tub of this supplement Jack3D to give you a bit of an energy boost. It is a bit like caffeine.

"Claire never really got on with it. She never really liked it.

"She said she would take one scoop in her water bottle.

"She said that if 'I hit a bit of [a] wall I will take it'.""
 
Sep 13, 2010
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del1962 said:
When they say not illegal at the time, that is for the general public

It may still have been illegal for elite athletes, it is difficult to tell.
Agreed, I noted with interest when her boyfriend say it wasn't "illegal".

Moral of story - read the label, If unclear about a product google it and look up banned list!
 
Sep 13, 2010
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enCYCLOpedia said:
In my opinion, taking something to help you through a bad patch in a race is performance enhancement (whether or not it actually worked is another matter).
A can of cola can help get you through a bad patch, doesn't mean it's banned or a PED
 
Jul 13, 2012
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Basecase said:
A can of cola can help get you through a bad patch, doesn't mean it's banned or a PED
True. I don't want to defend the rules on which performance enhancing substances are considered legal or illegal, and note that caffeine was also previously considered illegal (above a certain dose). Taking an excessive dose of caffeine before or during a marathon may in fact also increase your risk of a heart attack, and I would certainly not recommend it. But with caffeine, at least, there is a long history of safe consumption. DMAA was new on the market, and to take it before a marathon is asking for trouble. I assume that the runner did not even consider it potentially dangerous, so her death is tragic. I just hope that her example will make someone think twice, when the next "wonder pills" hit the market.

When you "hit a bad patch" in a marathon, it means you're at your limit. Any substances that promise to help you go beyond your limits, whether caffeine, amphetamines, painkillers, etc. are potentially dangerous, especially to novices.

A professional athlete (and that was the assertion in the original comment to which I replied) would never be able to "plead ignorance" about some substance inadvertently consumed with a food supplement. Rule #1, if you don't know what it is, don't take it.
 
del1962 said:
When they say not illegal at the time, that is for the general public

It may still have been illegal for elite athletes, it is difficult to tell.
It has been on the WADA list for a while - it is also known as Methylhexanamine, and has caused a lot of adverse analytical findings.
 

Djave Bikinus

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Jan 29, 2013
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enCYCLOpedia said:
Obviously, I don't know her. But in all likelihood, she was taking the substance (putting it in her drink) to get a boost in performance, which is exactly what the label promises. Whether she knew that the active ingredient was 1,3-dimethylamylamine, I very much doubt. According to the BBC article, her boyfriend said:

"She said she would take one scoop in her water bottle. She said that if 'I hit a bit of [a] wall I will take it' "

In my opinion, taking something to help you through a bad patch in a race is performance enhancement (whether or not it actually worked is another matter).
On reflection, I agree. I've just seen the news report where the circumstances were explained.

It reminds me much of the situation with so called 'research chemicals', which are for recreational use, not sporting use. Not illegal, because the chemists just tweak the chemical everytime the law catches up with them.

I wonder if she had any notion at all of what the active ingredient was?
 
Catwhoorg said:
It has been on the WADA list for a while - it is also known as Methylhexanamine, and has caused a lot of adverse analytical findings.
Also seems to crop up in a lot of supplements it's not supposed to be in, I think it was that that was in the supplements Rui Costa sent for testing after his positive. Possibly the only time I've ever heard the "must have been tainted supplements" excuse to turn out to be anything other than total BS.
 
May 12, 2012
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enCYCLOpedia said:
Obviously, I don't know her. But in all likelihood, she was taking the substance (putting it in her drink) to get a boost in performance, which is exactly what the label promises. Whether she knew that the active ingredient was 1,3-dimethylamylamine, I very much doubt. According to the BBC article, her boyfriend said:

"She said she would take one scoop in her water bottle. She said that if 'I hit a bit of [a] wall I will take it' "

In my opinion, taking something to help you through a bad patch in a race is performance enhancement (whether or not it actually worked is another matter).

Uhhhhh.... like an energy gel???
 
Jul 13, 2012
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wawa8223 said:
Uhhhhh.... like an energy gel???
Are you not able to read my quote in context? The question to which I replied was whether she took the stuff with the intent to enhance her performance (rather than to lose weight, as a previous poster had suggested). The quote from her boyfriend clearly demonstrates that she used it during the race, with the hope of improving her performance. That alone (without specifying the substance) says nothing about its legitimacy.
 
Mar 13, 2009
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enCYCLOpedia said:
No. It only shows what attitude some people have towards using drugs if they promise an enhancement in performance (note that MDAA was not illegal at the time, btw.).

No professional athlete would just take a "fat burning drink" without being absolutely sure about the ingredients.

Shane Warne

fluid tablet

mom

diuretic

if one was gullible
 
Mar 13, 2009
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Libertine Seguros said:
Also seems to crop up in a lot of supplements it's not supposed to be in, I think it was that that was in the supplements Rui Costa sent for testing after his positive. Possibly the only time I've ever heard the "must have been tainted supplements" excuse to turn out to be anything other than total BS.
nandrolone meat LS.

come on, do we believe Costa?
 
Bizairre on radio 5 live this morning, one guy who was supposed to be authorative (i was half asleep so didnt get his title) saying this product was always illegal in uk, radio 5 later said they checked their facts and it was legal, in fact one of the presenters took the supplement as an experiment during the olympics.
 
blackcat said:
nandrolone meat LS.

come on, do we believe Costa?
I said his excuse turned out not to be total BS. It could still have been partial BS. After all, he did still have said supplements for testing despite it being about four months between the tests (at the Portuguese nationals) and the positive being announced.

Nevertheless, the supplements were contaminated with the substance he tested positive for.
 
enCYCLOpedia said:
Obviously, I don't know her. But in all likelihood, she was taking the substance (putting it in her drink) to get a boost in performance, which is exactly what the label promises. Whether she knew that the active ingredient was 1,3-dimethylamylamine, I very much doubt. According to the BBC article, her boyfriend said:

"She said she would take one scoop in her water bottle. She said that if 'I hit a bit of [a] wall I will take it' "

In my opinion, taking something to help you through a bad patch in a race is performance enhancement (whether or not it actually worked is another matter).
-------------------
Drinking water enhances your performance too. The same is the case for a sportsdrink with water/sugar/salt. I think it is kind of harsh to blame somebody who just died for wanting to dope when they took something they may well have regarded as a sportsdrink.

On a sidenote, there are professional athletes that have been banned for this substance. It goes to show that one should steer clear of the supplements, and eat natural and healthy food.
 
Dec 9, 2009
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sometimes I think that The Clinic is pretty smart about doping and not jumping to conclusions...then I read the comments in here and I am blown away by how nieve and quick to jump the gun this section can get.

Jack3d is just a pre-workout supplement. It gives you energy, focus, and a bit of creatine.

This woman used it completely wrong. It could of easily been something similar that wasn't made for this application.

Obviously DMAA is on the WADA banned list...so you shouldn't be using this in any sanctioned event.

But for gym rats just lifting weights...the stuff is great. It isn't a "drug". For heaven's sake..in the US you can buy it in any supplement store.
 

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