Elite Cyclist Salary

Seems to be almost a non-issue in the WT. It's well-known that domestiques in plenty of ProContinental teams need to bring money, either their own or sponsor money. But then the fact of the matter is that without that, a ProConti domestique simply doesn't add value for anyone.
 
movingtarget said:
Once again the gap between the worst and the best is absurd. That is not much of a wage at all for the young riders or some of the domestiques. The women's wages must be a joke.
If you are Voss, then there's a wage. Women are lucky to get transportation and race housing. If they are riding the same bikes, they usually have to pay for those and the team uniform... At a discount.

Road continental level at least in the U.S. is terrible too. A few are lucky to make more than a barista. It's much worse in mountain biking.
 
A good article, I'd imagine its a lot more cut throat at Pro Conti level, its not unheard of in F1 for rich dads to pay for their sons drive, I think Pedro Diniz did when he was with Hill at Arrows. Only think is he was already a millionaire, these guys in cycling are not like that.

I always suspected things like the article suggests went on.
 
MellowJohnny said:
A good article, I'd imagine its a lot more cut throat at Pro Conti level, its not unheard of in F1 for rich dads to pay for their sons drive, I think Pedro Diniz did when he was with Hill at Arrows. Only think is he was already a millionaire, these guys in cycling are not like that.

I always suspected things like the article suggests went on.
In Formula 1 nearly every rider not in the top 4 teams brings money, whether it's dad (less common since we're talking millions a year) or personal sponsor(s).

In cycling, it's probably similar. The problem is that a domestique on a ProConti teams represents very little economic value.
 
Jun 30, 2012
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Riding bikes for a living is a rare privilege, paid for by others. The vast majority of us are not paid to ride, nor to race. I really don't care about a few people who think they are entitled to some sort of professional career at our expense. They should just get a job like the rest of us.
 
I know pro riders riding for 300 euros a month, and I know pro that are riding for free some races againts Contador.

I know Oscar Pujol had an offer to race by paying his insurance, so less than for free, and Pujol is a rider that has got some results in teams as Cervelo.
 
winkybiker said:
Riding bikes for a living is a rare privilege, paid for by others. The vast majority of us are not paid to ride, nor to race. I really don't care about a few people who think they are entitled to some sort of professional career at our expense. They should just get a job like the rest of us.
Wait a minute, these guys are signing on the dotted line, with the understanding that racing is now their profession. For those riders on Conti squads, sure, they aren't fully professional and unless they're relatively high profile they understand that they almost certainly aren't going to get a salary.

However those riders at Pro Conti and above, they are, by definition, pros expected to be working as full time athletes. If someone expects you to work for them exclusively, full time and to perform effectively, to your full capacity without distraction in a role that is defined as professional from the outset then I think that being paid a salary that allows a person to do this isn't an unfair demand.

Being expected to refund a salary while attempting to maintain a pro's level of health, fitness and nutrition is absolutely stupid.
 
Mar 31, 2010
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ingsve said:
Cycling needs to get media money into the teams budget like other TV-sports.
other than football, american sports and formula 1 there is no tv money in any sport. cycling has nothing to gain from tv money because there is no tv money
 
Aug 4, 2010
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Ryo Hazuki said:
other than football, american sports and formula 1 there is no tv money in any sport. cycling has nothing to gain from tv money because there is no tv money
tennis,golf...
 
Mar 26, 2009
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Cycling has the "endurance sport related problem"; it takes long time to arrive at the peak moment, while a football match or motorsport can have exciting moments all over the race since the start.

The cx formula works a lot better for tv; 1 hr with lots of technical segments.
 
42x16ss said:
However those riders at Pro Conti and above, they are, by definition, pros expected to be working as full time athletes. If someone expects you to work for them exclusively, full time and to perform effectively, to your full capacity without distraction in a role that is defined as professional from the outset then I think that being paid a salary that allows a person to do this isn't an unfair demand.

Being expected to refund a salary while attempting to maintain a pro's level of health, fitness and nutrition is absolutely stupid.
What makes you say that? You're describing an attitude of entitlement among riders that is not true.
 
More Strides than Rides said:
What makes you say that? You're describing an attitude of entitlement among riders that is not true.
Let me check Webster's:

Main Entry: 1pro·fes·sion·al
Pronunciation: \prə-ˈfesh-nəl, -ˈfe-shə-nəl\
Function: adjective
Date: 1606

engaged in by persons receiving financial return <professional football>

The very definition of what these guys are kind of implies they're paid, does it not ?
 
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42x16ss said:
Let me check Webster's:

Main Entry: 1pro·fes·sion·al
Pronunciation: \prə-ˈfesh-nəl, -ˈfe-shə-nəl\
Function: adjective
Date: 1606

engaged in by persons receiving financial return <professional football>

The very definition of what these guys are kind of implies they're paid, does it not ?
Not necessarily as one can have a professional approach or mindset without receiving direct income.

Riders on UCI WT and PC teams are not on a salary. They are independent contractors and what they do or don't do is outlined in their contract.

So if they aren't happy they can potentially sue under the contractual remedies law that might apply in the jurisdiction probably of the UCI licence holder.

I am surprised you have these expectations as I understand that most NRS riders in Australia are not paid yet they, and the media, often refer to themselves as professionals.

I wonder how much Wes Selzberger is being paid next year by his new team and what the other riders who get nothing will be thinking!
 
timmers said:
Not necessarily as one can have a professional approach or mindset without receiving direct income.

Riders on UCI WT and PC teams are not on a salary. They are independent contractors and what they do or don't do is outlined in their contract.

So if they aren't happy they can potentially sue under the contractual remedies law that might apply in the jurisdiction probably of the UCI licence holder.

I am surprised you have these expectations as I understand that most NRS riders in Australia are not paid yet they, and the media, often refer to themselves as professionals.

I wonder how much Wes Selzberger is being paid next year by his new team and what the other riders who get nothing will be thinking!
No matter how they are referred to, NRS and Continental riders are NOT PROFESSIONALS!!! IF they receive a salary it is at their teams' discretion, because they feel it is necessary to retain that rider.

However riders on World Tour and Pro Continental teams are and according to the UCI's regulations they ARE supposed to be earning a minimum wage! The minimum wages are set by the UCI!!! What part of this do people not understand???? :confused: Teams expecting refunded salaries are violating the UCI's regulations. This is the whole point of the article.
 
World Tour Wages

Here's some more information about wages from the agent's side.

http://cyclingtips.com.au/2014/12/what-factors-determine-pro-cyclist-salaries/

IMO, the salary numbers mentioned are mostly quite high. Reality is closer to this, even at the WT level: “It has not been the easiest season. I would guess between 30 and 40 percent of the peloton would be close to the minimum,” he said, clarifying that he is also including the Pro Continental teams in that calculation. “With Topsport Vlaanderen, for example, everyone rides for the minimum wage, or close to the minimum wage.

All consequences of the UCI's reforms. The next 5 years will be brutal on rider's salary.
 
DirtyWorks said:
Here's some more information about wages from the agent's side.

http://cyclingtips.com.au/2014/12/what-factors-determine-pro-cyclist-salaries/

IMO, the salary numbers mentioned are mostly quite high. Reality is closer to this, even at the WT level: “It has not been the easiest season. I would guess between 30 and 40 percent of the peloton would be close to the minimum,” he said, clarifying that he is also including the Pro Continental teams in that calculation. “With Topsport Vlaanderen, for example, everyone rides for the minimum wage, or close to the minimum wage.

All consequences of the UCI's reforms. The next 5 years will be brutal on rider's salary.
Very interesting read...thanks for sharing.
 
I remember Emma Pooley saying she won more for a third place in a Phillipines Triathlon, than she ever did in cycling. and Katie Colclough retired (at 22) after winning the WTT to go to University.

For pure road riders, women's salaries must be pretty dismal. Bit different if you can combine it with the track I suppose, at least in the UK
 
postmanhat said:
I remember Emma Pooley saying she won more for a third place in a Phillipines Triathlon, than she ever did in cycling. and Katie Colclough retired (at 22) after winning the WTT to go to University.

For pure road riders, women's salaries must be pretty dismal. Bit different if you can combine it with the track I suppose, at least in the UK
What salary? Some are lucky to get travel and stay to some events, not all, on their World Tour. Being "hired" and paid nothing is common in elite Women's cycling.
 
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