Eurosport commentary

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And we're off! Eurosport live cycling returning next Sunday on ES2 for the GP La Marseillaise. Jose Been has also posted a list of races she will be commentating on which is why this list has more beens than a can of Heinz!

British Eurosport commentary pairings season 2022 (men's elite):

Australian National Championships: host broadcaster package
Challenge Mallorca: Trofeo Calvia (highlights on 26/1): Kirby (solo)
Challenge Mallorca: Trofeo Alcúdia - Port d'Alcúdia (highlights on 27/1): Kirby (solo)
Challenge Mallorca: Trofeo Serra de Tramuntana (highlights on 28/1): Kirby (solo)
Challenge Mallorca: Trofeo Pollença - Port d'Andratx (highlights on 29/1): Kirby (solo)
Challenge Mallorca: Trofeo Playa de Palma - Palma (highlights on 30/1): Kirby (solo)
Grand Prix Cycliste de Marseille La Marseillaise (live on 30/1): Been & Stephens
Saudi Tour (live from 1/2): Cox & Smith
Volta a la Comunitat Valenciana (live from 2/2): Stephens & Backstedt
Tour de Provence (live from 10/2): Stephens & Blythe
Vuelta Ciclista a la Region de Murcia Costa Calida (live 12/2): Been & ??
Clasica de Almeria (live on 13/2): Been & ??
Jaén Paraiso Interior (live on 14/2): Been & ??
Vuelta a Andalusia (live from 16/2): tbc
Volta ao Algarve (live from 16/2): tbc
Tour des Alpes Maritimes et du Var (live from 18/2): Been & ??
Le Samyn (live on 1/3): Been & ??
Grote Prijs Jean-Pierre Monseré (live 6/3): Been & ??
Danilith Nokere Koerse (live on 16/3): Been & ??
Grand Prix de Denain - Porte du Hainaut (live on 17/3) Been & ??
 
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Reactions: yaco
I hope that this is commentary team B, not that all the rights to WT races have been lost :worried:
Those are just the races on which Jose Been said she in commenting. The GCN schedule lists of the WT races (at least through March, I didn't look farther) plus a whole bunch of other races like Andalucía, Algarve, Saudi Tour, the new stage race in Galicia, KBK, Milano-Torino and probably a few more that I forgot. I assume all will be on ES except possibly a few smaller ones GCN/ESPlayer only.
 
Reactions: Sandisfan
Question: I've noticed on Eurosport/GCN that riders are almost always referred to by first and last name, while in the US, riders are usually referred to only by last name. I was watching cyclocross this morning, and all throughout the race the announcers were referring to: Marianne Vos, Lucinda Brand, and Puck Pieterse . . . every time. In the US they would be introduced that way, but during the race it would be Vos, Brand, and Pieterse. In the NBC coverage of racers, last names are the norm. Am I right about this, or am I out to lunch? if so, is this a UK style, broadly European, or what? Any ideas why?
 
Reactions: Sandisfan
Question: I've noticed on Eurosport/GCN that riders are almost always referred to by first and last name, while in the US, riders are usually referred to only by last name. I was watching cyclocross this morning, and all throughout the race the announcers were referring to: Marianne Vos, Lucinda Brand, and Puck Pieterse . . . every time. In the US they would be introduced that way, but during the race it would be Vos, Brand, and Pieterse. In the NBC coverage of racers, last names are the norm. Am I right about this, or am I out to lunch? if so, is this a UK style, broadly European, or what? Any ideas why?
I think it depends on who is commentating. There was one guy on Danish Eurosport who did a few races in 2019, and he also insisted on doing that. I remember one finale that included Valverde and Urán and he insisted on throwing an Alejandro and a Rigoberto in every time with correct pronunciation which was just insanely annoying to listen to because it made it take forever to say their names.

It would surprise me if there is a clear-cut difference between British and American commentators.
 
Question: I've noticed on Eurosport/GCN that riders are almost always referred to by first and last name, while in the US, riders are usually referred to only by last name. I was watching cyclocross this morning, and all throughout the race the announcers were referring to: Marianne Vos, Lucinda Brand, and Puck Pieterse . . . every time. In the US they would be introduced that way, but during the race it would be Vos, Brand, and Pieterse. In the NBC coverage of racers, last names are the norm. Am I right about this, or am I out to lunch? if so, is this a UK style, broadly European, or what? Any ideas why?
In Germany there is often a difference between men and women. Men are often only called by their last name, while for women both names are used. Don't know whether that's similar in the UK.
 
Question: I've noticed on Eurosport/GCN that riders are almost always referred to by first and last name, while in the US, riders are usually referred to only by last name. I was watching cyclocross this morning, and all throughout the race the announcers were referring to: Marianne Vos, Lucinda Brand, and Puck Pieterse . . . every time. In the US they would be introduced that way, but during the race it would be Vos, Brand, and Pieterse. In the NBC coverage of racers, last names are the norm. Am I right about this, or am I out to lunch? if so, is this a UK style, broadly European, or what? Any ideas why?
Well, sometimes they have to use both names, otherwise, it could get rather confusing.

"Yates attacks! But Yates follows. Yates just cannot shake off Yates."

Commentated by Sean Yates.
 
Surname only is more common in UK commentary, especially when things are happening quickly.

Cyclocross is probably a bit different in that there is often only one rider in shot at a time, and rarely more than about 4. If there is time, or if the commentator is giving details about a rider rather than simply listing him as present or active, then forenames are more likely.

Use of forenames only, or nicknames, should be summarily dealt with by stranglig the commentator with his/her own microphone cord.
 
Reactions: davidsonduke
Hardly the point...
Well, my point is that there isn't really a set convention. Sometimes, it's just personal preferences. Sometimes, there's a practical reason.
Of course, the opposite also happens, where a commentator will use surname-only, even though there are multiple riders with the same name. For example; I think I have at least a couple of times during this cross-season heard the phrase "Van Der Poel isn't racing, but the other Van Der Poel is." Or if there's a sprint, then hardly anyone is gonna wonder if "Bennett" refers to Sam or George.
 
Reactions: Sandisfan
In Germany there is often a difference between men and women. Men are often only called by their last name, while for women both names are used. Don't know whether that's similar in the UK.
I think you might be right there. I'll keep an ear out for this during the season.
What annoys me most in the UK - and I think ITV are more guilty of this than Eurosport - is commentators being overly familiar, eg referring to Thomas as G. Come to think of that Mr Kirby is guilty of this as well.
 
Reactions: Sandisfan
I'm not necessarily against using the forename every once in a while. Like when we're in the middle of a big attack or the finale of a race and an italian commentator says "dai Vincenzo". Might be too personal and too chauvinistic for someone, but I'm ok with it since sports is about emotions too.
That said, it shouldn't be the norm and more than anything there shouldn't be a difference between men and women. Too often in Italy popular women are called by their forename (like they were a cute little friend), while the same doesn't apply for popular men.
 
Reactions: BlueRoads
I'm not necessarily against using the forename every once in a while. Like when we're in the middle of a big attack or the finale of a race and an italian commentator says "dai Vincenzo". Might be too personal and too chauvinistic for someone, but I'm ok with it since sports is about emotions too.
That said, it shouldn't be the norm and more than anything there shouldn't be a difference between men and women. Too often in Italy popular women are called by their forename (like they were a cute little friend), while the same doesn't apply for popular men.
At least in some cultures women in general have more distinguishable forenames than men, which in itself could lead to what appears as gender discrimination.
 
Reactions: Sandisfan
I'm not necessarily against using the forename every once in a while. Like when we're in the middle of a big attack or the finale of a race and an italian commentator says "dai Vincenzo". Might be too personal and too chauvinistic for someone, but I'm ok with it since sports is about emotions too.
That said, it shouldn't be the norm and more than anything there shouldn't be a difference between men and women. Too often in Italy popular women are called by their forename (like they were a cute little friend), while the same doesn't apply for popular men.
Agree, but I think the root lies already in everyday life. At least here it's very normal among boys to call one or the other by their surnames or a form of it. Like Pascal Ackermann "Ackes" has probably been called that already in school. Or "Schachi" Schachmann. Samuel Höfler (don't think he exists) might be referred to as "Höfler". But very few girls or boys would call Elisa Höfler "Höfler" at school, they would make it Elisa or Eli or Lisa or whatever.
 

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