Giro d'Italia Fedaia.....FEDAIAAAA!!!!!

This is not something that I am definitely going to do, but today I suddenly felt this strong urge to want to travel to Italy (and to the Giro) next year.

I have never been (to the Giro; I went to 3 main cities on a contiki tour many years ago). I remember considering to do so in 2018 if Contador raced another season and returned; obviously that didn't happen. Anyway, with Fedaia as the MTF of the penultimate stage, I feel it could be as good a time as any.

Does anyone here have experience with attending Giro stages, particularly in the mountains? I would love to hear how difficult (maybe nigh on impossible) it is to move around Italy at these times. My idea is probably to fly into Milan and hire a car there, and drive and stay around parts of the north like Lake Como for sure, Stelvio and Dolomites national parks (if accessible), maybe Venice and Verona (where stage 21 ITT is held). I like the idea of getting drunk in a bar with the locals whilst watching the stage over Mortirolo (Though do Italians watch the Giro in pubs? And do they get drunk on a Tuesday? :p ).

I am not a cyclist at all myself, but do like to hike. I imagine that there would be many wonderful areas in this part of the world to do so.

If anyone else considers being on THE mountain for stage 20, maybe I'll (buy) and be wearing a Liberty Seguros top for the occasion :)
 
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Traveling in italy is no problem at the moment. I was there in octobre (south tyrol/bozen/dolomits). You will need the green pass (probably only vaccination then). The coma sea is really nice, too. I was there (in Dongo) last year. Its probably better to hike there in spring because there will probably no snow while there will certainly be snow in the dolomits. But I think you can hike at the lower slopes and see the beautiful hills. The dolomits are really nice to watch and hike around.
 
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This is not something that I am definitely going to do, but today I suddenly felt this strong urge to want to travel to Italy (and to the Giro) next year.

I have never been (to the Giro; I went to 3 main cities on a contiki tour many years ago). I remember considering to do so in 2018 if Contador raced another season and returned; obviously that didn't happen. Anyway, with Fedaia as the MTF of the penultimate stage, I feel it could be as good a time as any.

Does anyone here have experience with attending Giro stages, particularly in the mountains? I would love to hear how difficult (maybe nigh on impossible) it is to move around Italy at these times. My idea is probably to fly into Milan and hire a car there, and drive and stay around parts of the north like Lake Como for sure, Stelvio and Dolomites national parks (if accessible), maybe Venice and Verona (where stage 21 ITT is held). I like the idea of getting drunk in a bar with the locals whilst watching the stage over Mortirolo (Though do Italians watch the Giro in pubs? And do they get drunk on a Tuesday? :p ).

I am not a cyclist at all myself, but do like to hike. I imagine that there would be many wonderful areas in this part of the world to do so.

If anyone else considers being on THE mountain for stage 20, maybe I'll (buy) and be wearing a Liberty Seguros top for the occasion :)
I often go to these parts for MTB riding - usually late summer. It's basically off season for the ski resorts a definitely not so crowded as in the winter. No problem to find a place to stay/eat/drink - although we tend to choose smaller villages/cities (Bormino, Livigno, Canazei, etc). Moving around is without any problems (we were in Venezia/Bologna last week) even now - green pass is being checked in pubs or restaurants. Might be more visitors during the Giro but the capacity should be fine as even during the Giro it is much less people than in the winter season.
 
I was just running in the streets of Verona :(

But I had actually planned to go to Tuscany and rent a bike for a couple of days... That plan didn't materialise...
Sorry about that. Really wasn't sure if you were being serious initially.

Understand then that you could have bad feelings about travelling to Italy. However, bad things happen to travellers all around the world. It's no reason not to travel somewhere (unless you're talking somewhere with a high homicide rate for example). Remember that we are all going to die....eventually. Sometimes we need to try to really live before we do so.
 
Does anyone here have experience with attending Giro stages, particularly in the mountains? I would love to hear how difficult (maybe nigh on impossible) it is to move around Italy at these times. My idea is probably to fly into Milan and hire a car there, and drive and stay around parts of the north like Lake Como for sure, Stelvio and Dolomites national parks (if accessible), maybe Venice and Verona (where stage 21 ITT is held). I like the idea of getting drunk in a bar with the locals whilst watching the stage over Mortirolo (Though do Italians watch the Giro in pubs? And do they get drunk on a Tuesday? :p ).

I am not a cyclist at all myself, but do like to hike. I imagine that there would be many wonderful areas in this part of the world to do so.

If anyone else considers being on THE mountain for stage 20, maybe I'll (buy) and be wearing a Liberty Seguros top for the occasion :)
I've attended several stages over the years, mostly mountain stages.
Moving around Italy during the Giro is not hard but it requires you to plan ahead. Stage starts and arrives obviously tend to be very crowded and, depending on the topography, sometimes nearly inaccessible. Normally the road to MTF gets closed to cars 24 hours ahead (unless there's a town on top, like Pratonevoso or Madesimo).
Iconic big climbs are always closed to cars way ahead. I'm pretty sure Fedaia will fall in this category, so you'll be forced to leave your car in Caprile and climb on feet / bike. Sometimes a bus service will help you get halfway to the top or something, but I don't think this will be the case. I'm planning to be on Fedaia after this year's debacle but it will depend on the weather.

All major north lakes, the Adamello Brenta Geopark, the Dolomites and a ton of pretty towns can be visited in a reasonbly short time from Milano. I believe Venice and Verona will be very crowded so book your accomodation in advance. Same for Torino if you plan on landing the weekend before. Generally speaking, if you decide to follow the Giro for a few days I suggest watching a stage and then get to the next stage area at night, so you'll be able to sleep there and get to your spot early the next day.

Italians don't watch the Giro in pubs because pubs are seldom open before 6 pm. They watch the Giro in bars though, especially in smaller towns where you'll be met by old people drinking a glass of white wine or a grappino even before lunch. Green pass is mandatory to enter any restaurant / bar / public event behind closed doors.
 
Sorry about that. Really wasn't sure if you were being serious initially.

Understand then that you could have bad feelings about travelling to Italy. However, bad things happen to travellers all around the world. It's no reason not to travel somewhere (unless you're talking somewhere with a high homicide rate for example). Remember that we are all going to die....eventually. Sometimes we need to try to really live before we do so.
Well, my accident happened, but of course I was not serious about Italy being a dangerous place because I couldn't control my feet...
 
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Yeah we already have the green/vaccination pass/certificate on our phones in Australia now too for gaining entry into restaurants, so it seems that this is working well worldwide.

Flight deals are okay to Milan or Venice, and I like Venice. I'd probably try for 4 nights in Como, making that my main stay (wouldn't be longer than 12 days total), for its beauty and its hiking possibilities.

With Fedaia, I wonder how hard it would be to get to the climb? Do you have to camp their overnight (before the stage)? I imagine that roads would be closed off well before the riders reached it. It would be safer I presume to go to Verona for the ITT.
 
I've attended several stages over the years, mostly mountain stages.
Moving around Italy during the Giro is not hard but it requires you to plan ahead. Stage starts and arrives obviously tend to be very crowded and, depending on the topography, sometimes nearly inaccessible. Normally the road to MTF gets closed to cars 24 hours ahead (unless there's a town on top, like Pratonevoso or Madesimo).
Iconic big climbs are always closed to cars way ahead. I'm pretty sure Fedaia will fall in this category, so you'll be forced to leave your car in Caprile and climb on feet / bike. Sometimes a bus service will help you get halfway to the top or something, but I don't think this will be the case. I'm planning to be on Fedaia after this year's debacle but it will depend on the weather.

All major north lakes, the Adamello Brenta Geopark, the Dolomites and a ton of pretty towns can be visited in a reasonbly short time from Milano. I believe Venice and Verona will be very crowded so book your accomodation in advance. Same for Torino if you plan on landing the weekend before. Generally speaking, if you decide to follow the Giro for a few days I suggest watching a stage and then get to the next stage area at night, so you'll be able to sleep there and get to your spot early the next day.

Italians don't watch the Giro in pubs because pubs are seldom open before 6 pm. They watch the Giro in bars though, especially in smaller towns where you'll be met by old people drinking a glass of white wine or a grappino even before lunch. Green pass is mandatory to enter any restaurant / bar / public event behind closed doors.
Caprile looks beautiful. I already want to stay there! Though I assume that hotel rooms will be at a premium as the Giro approaches....

But as you seem to suggest, stay elsewhere, and drive to Caprile in the early morning of the stage.

I love the idea of hiking from there all the way to the top of Fedaia. I am not the fittest guy, but not the most unfit either; with the adrenalin of such adventure I believe I could make it up (and back down again). Is there a reasonable hiking trail for this?

I have hiked up Verbier and AX3 Domaines before (well away from cycling races though, and I'm aware that such climbing is barely half that of Fedaia).

Pubs, bars....to an Aussie they mean the same thing.

Thanks for the tips.
 
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Caprile looks beautiful. I already want to stay there! Though I assume that hotel rooms will be at a premium as the Giro approaches....

But as you seem to suggest, stay elsewhere, and drive to Caprile in the early morning of the stage.

I love the idea of hiking from there all the way to the top of Fedaia. I am not the fittest guy, but not the most unfit either; with the adrenalin of such adventure I believe I could make it up (and back down again). Is there a reasonable hiking trail for this?
Finding a hotel in Caprile would be wonderful but I guess you'd have to book it now and expect some steep prices anyway.
I'm not sure there's a trail from the town all the way to the top. It's likely, but I have never done it. In my experience walking on the road where the riders will pass later is always an amazing experience, be it for the fans, the emotion of seeing the iconic road, the names written on the streets, etc...
I'll try to gather more info about that area.
 
Over 10 years ago I went to a stage of the Giro that finished on the Fedaia. I had my car and bikes, got there a few days before, stayed in a campsite in Canazei and went riding for a few days before Giro arrived. Campsite was empty until the Giro arrived, but was still nowhere near full even at Giro time. If you can, I recommend doing something similar, Dolomites are probably my favourite place in the World, Pordoi, Sella, San Pellegrino, Campalongo, Gardena all within cycling distance.

Went to a few other stages in the area, Alpe de Pampeago/Kronplatz. On the morning of the Fedaia stage, there was a shuttle bus from Canazei to the stage finish on the Fedaia. However, this being Italy, there was no queueing system and everytime the bus arrived, it was like a scene from the recent evacuation of Kabul. I gave up, got my bike out and cycled to the top. If you do this option, be sure to bring extra/warm clothes as after climbing and sweating, you obviously get cold standing around waiting for the race.

Now, it was a while ago, but stage start and finish areas were far more accessible at the Giro than at the Tour. I had to cross the finish line and pass all the team buses to go back down and I was literally passing riders who had just finished. Loved it.
 
To an Aussi bars and pubs mean the same thing, but not to an Italian. In Italy a bar is a caffè, which is generally open from the early morning to late night and thus from breakfast to happy hour to nightcap, where coffee and cornetti/brioche (breakfast) and panini and pizzette (lunch) are served, as are wine, appeitivi, liquori, amari, beer, etc. depending on the time of the day. If there is a TV the clients, often old men in the small towns and age-old establishments, sip wine and watch calcio (football), while getting worked up over the latest political intrigues. The pub is a totally different Anglican concept and atmosphere.

If you are looking for a picturesque place in the heart of the Dolimites that's not the boutique-like Cortina d'Ampezzo, then Ortisei (St. Ulrich) is hard to beat. It is located at the foot of Passo Sella, with easy access to Passo Fedaia, Passo Pordoi, Passo Gardena etc.

Cheers.
 
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Over 10 years ago I went to a stage of the Giro that finished on the Fedaia. I had my car and bikes, got there a few days before, stayed in a campsite in Canazei and went riding for a few days before Giro arrived. Campsite was empty until the Giro arrived, but was still nowhere near full even at Giro time. If you can, I recommend doing something similar, Dolomites are probably my favourite place in the World, Pordoi, Sella, San Pellegrino, Campalongo, Gardena all within cycling distance.

Went to a few other stages in the area, Alpe de Pampeago/Kronplatz. On the morning of the Fedaia stage, there was a shuttle bus from Canazei to the stage finish on the Fedaia. However, this being Italy, there was no queueing system and everytime the bus arrived, it was like a scene from the recent evacuation of Kabul. I gave up, got my bike out and cycled to the top. If you do this option, be sure to bring extra/warm clothes as after climbing and sweating, you obviously get cold standing around waiting for the race.

Now, it was a while ago, but stage start and finish areas were far more accessible at the Giro than at the Tour. I had to cross the finish line and pass all the team buses to go back down and I was literally passing riders who had just finished. Loved it.
Great account. Canazei is also a fantastic location, but I find the village of Ortisei to be more charming.
 
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If you’re a hiker (fitness wise) I would think you would enjoy walking up the road with the melange of different national fans, campsites, writing on the road, etc. You also may find a great viewpoint along the way rather than at the very finish. The steepest sections of road towards the top of the climb—particularly if you can see the race coming from a distance below—are often the best spots. The challenge might be parking close enough at the base of the climb to start your walk.
 
If you’re a hiker (fitness wise) I would think you would enjoy walking up the road with the melange of different national fans, campsites, writing on the road, etc. You also may find a great viewpoint along the way rather than at the very finish. The steepest sections of road towards the top of the climb—particularly if you can see the race coming from a distance below—are often the best spots.
Yep and Fedaia has a series of short hairpins near the top which looks perfect for this.
Finding a parking spot might prove difficult but normally on race day policemen close an eye even if you get creative with your parking.
 

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