General Doping Thread.

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I was reminded of this today, with all the riders dropping out developing chest infections and such, lets see who's flying in a week.


I’ve heard about this, with some of the Classics riders. They’ll pull out, a week or so before a big race, say they have a knee injury, or a sore ankle, or bronchitis, get a TUE for cortisone, get an injection, and then take a little more just before the race. If they get tested, they just say, “Eight days ago, I took something, and I have a TUE.” It’s the same sort of thing. Three days before the Tour de France? I mean, come on.

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Finished the race (didn't ride MSR)
 
MTB related
Not really buying watching Lecomte drop everyone from the get go without even having to open her mouth. Race not over but huge gaps after 1/3 of the race and when the announcers are commenting that she's not even trying too hard ... yikes

EDIT - I called this too early (always a risk to do in the middle of a race) ... things looking a fair bit less ridiculous by race's end
 
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He got suspended for forgetting to get a TUE for ADD medication
Saying he forgot is being very, very kind:
“Because I was a guest rider, I thought I was only going to be invited to a handful of races,” Summerhill explains.

“Prior to reentering the sport, I never thought to submit an application with USADA for permission to use my new medication and get a Therapeutic Use Exemption. I am a human (and a forgetful human with ADD at that) and I made a mistake.”
 
Is this news to anybody? Might it explain MVdP's chronic back pain?
I know in our nursing books and NCLEX prep they speak of NSAIDs having the potential to cause bone issues and increase time on bone healing.

“A proportion of these studies suggest that NSAIDs adversely affect the bone physiology by delaying bone healing and callus formation, impairing bending stiffness and the bones' mechanical properties leading to an increased rate of nonunions [74–105].”

 
Is this news to anybody? Might it explain MVdP's chronic back pain?
I would say it's extremely unlikely. And keep in mind this study is a small one, and caution should be used interpreting the findings.

Let's look at the most obvious. The reports re MVDP discuss disc herniation issues, and I think we have all witnessed that he did not have a strong propensity to take sufficient time to let it heal. Disc issues are permanent, so he will always need to take more care/caution/preventative measures going forward.

For all we know, MVDP doesn't even take NSAIDs :)
 
I think the things to keep in mind are that for young people, they can have horrible disc damage and pain without it being related to bone strength (from accident or biomechanics). And that for elite athletes pain tolerance is a big part of keeping to a high workload and performance level, which typically means gobbling NSAIDs, and also explains why corticosteroids and trazadone have been such popular PEDs.
ed. sorry -tramadol not trazadone.
 
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This makes me want to continue in the clinic. It gives me really weird thoughts :D
From the Almeida thread about which high profile riders that haven't crashed:

I suddenly started wondering about which drugs helps descending. IE which drugs apart from for example amphetamine that will help with concentrating. Logically concentration/awakeness should be crucial?

Not sure I am even finding the right English words here, but I hope it's clear what I'm after.
 
From the Almeida thread about which high profile riders that haven't crashed:

I suddenly started wondering about which drugs helps descending. IE which drugs apart from for example amphetamine that will help with concentrating. Logically concentration/awakeness should be crucial?

Not sure I am even finding the right English words here, but I hope it's clear what I'm after.
Probably beta blockers, stuff like diazepam like you see in shooting?
 
Reactions: noob
One non-PED that at least one rider talked of using is Prozac, which Riis turned to:
"The pills made me feel much more positive, which allowed me to see possibilities rather than limitations. This really seemed to help at stage races, which can be very stressful mentally, and where maintaining a positive frame of mind could really help."
The idea of a descending drug seems a bit daft to me, the risk/reward pay-off is wrong, especially given the options. Better to just learn how to do it, to use psychology to counter any mental issues you might have.
 
One non-PED that at least one rider talked of using is Prozac, which Riis turned to:The idea of a descending drug seems a bit daft to me, the risk/reward pay-off is wrong, especially given the options. Better to just learn how to do it, to use psychology to counter any mental issues you might have.
I agree. Also, not overdoing stimulants (eg caffeine)! I remember doing some cross country races and criteriums ... Some of the guys at the beginning of the race were very jacked up, probably a few too many espressos! Anyhow, they were able to take off like lightning bolts and put the hurt on everyone right away, but then they crashed early on because they were so jittery they just couldn't handle the technical aspects.

A note about antidepressants - given how hard professional sport is, and specifically how hard cycling is, I would not be surprised if prescription antidepressant use in the peloton was very high (i.e. higher than in the general population) ... Not sure if there's any data clarifying that? For some people, such medication might indeed be performance enhancing if it makes the right difference in their mood (and not lead to weight gain); additionally, for some select people there are other benefits, such as weight loss or some extent of increased pain tolerance. This said, certainly not a magic bullet, as some people find their performance decreases when taking such medication.
 

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