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Giro d’Italia 2024, Stage 11: Foiano di Val Fortore – Francavilla al Mare, 207.0k

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I wonder actually what percentage of crashes in the final 10 kilometers happens in corners, considering most of the time riders just chop each other down on straight roads.

I feel they rode it smart, Ineos taking the initiative and the rest of the field being experienced enough, due to a lot of sprinters and their teams on this Giro edition. Otherwise likely there would be much more crashes involved so far.
 
There are no signs of turning it around at the moment. Think he's had one top 10 finish in this race. Three years since he's had a grand tour stage win. Meanwhile the almost retired Michael Matthews is getting podiums in monuments............

Pure sprinters age quickly, no? Some of them transform to quality classics rider, probably not going to happen with Ewan..:D But for comparison it's busy time for Milan to fork around as much wins in same amount of seasons as CE has done.
 
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I don’t know, it looked more like a racing move than anything dangerous or unsportsmanlike to me. I get it was unnecessary, I just think it’s antithetical for sprinting to be all about positioning for 99% of the lead out then you have to remember not to move once the sprint is launched. Hard to not let instincts kick in. It’s probably a good rule but in this case nothing really dangerous was done.
 
Merlier moved halfway across the road right up to the barriers in the first 2 seconds of his sprint and yet certain posters would have you believe it was a ridiculous decision to relegate him. Coincidentally, said posters all happen to be Flemish.
Generally, I think it's quite legitimate to pick the lane along the barriers even if you come off a wheel in the middle of the road. But you need to be able to do so safely, and here Merlier failed to do so.

A little of the blame also rests with Molano. They knew it was the favoured side, so I think he should have expected to more easily find space to the left of Merlier.
 
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Merlier moved halfway across the road right up to the barriers in the first 2 seconds of his sprint and yet certain posters would have you believe it was a ridiculous decision to relegate him. Coincidentally, said posters all happen to be Flemish.

Merlier switches his line because of the wind, not to cut off an opponent. He gets there before Molano can catch up with him, or at least that's how I saw it.

I'm not saying he shouldn't get a warning. But in my opinion a relegation happens too fast nowadays. I referred to Matthews, who isn't Flemish as far as I recall.
 
I wonder actually what percentage of crashes in the final 10 kilometers happens in corners, considering most of the time riders just chop each other down on straight roads.
In my view, crashes in corners in sprint finales tend to fall in one of three groups:
- the corner is very technical/dangerous
- the roads are very slippery due to rain
- less commonly: the final corner is too close to the line

Corners that do not fall within any of these groups inherently make the sprint less dangerous.