Has any Spanish athlete NOT been "exonerated" by Spain ?

Dec 30, 2010
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Has any Spanish doper NOT been "exonerated" by Spain ?

Another Spaniard "exonerated" by Spain.

Contador, Valverde, Dominguez, Bezabeh, Heras, destruction of blood bags, abundance of Spanish doping doctors,... Has anything changed in Spain ?

Spain keeps promising that they are changing, yet the protection of it's homegrown dopers continues.
 
Aug 3, 2009
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Andynonomous said:
Another Spaniard "exonerated" by Spain.

Contador, Valverde, Dominguez, Bezabeh, Heras, destruction of blood bags, abundance of Spanish doping doctors,... Has anything changed in Spain ?

Spain keeps promising that they are changing, yet the protection of it's homegrown dopers continues.
Things are very consistent there. Please reference precipitation's preference for remaining in the flatlands...
 
Andynonomous said:
Another Spaniard "exonerated" by Spain.

Contador, Valverde, Dominguez, Bezabeh, Heras, destruction of blood bags, abundance of Spanish doping doctors,... Has anything changed in Spain ?

Spain keeps promising that they are changing, yet the protection of it's homegrown dopers continues.
Guardiola was also exonerated.

Now if you point out to the idiot football fans that the guy behind 2 of the most succesful teams in recent history was fuelled by nandrolone theyll say - but it was proven he hidn't dope
 
May 27, 2010
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C'mon. You need to take it easy on Spain.

They may be enjoying their 'Golden Era' in sports, but they are having tough economic times.

Nobody can afford to dope there.

Dave.
 
Dec 30, 2010
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Archibald said:
would Astarloa count?
I admit, it was more of a rhetorical question. :p

Of course the Basque cyclist was retired when he was banned, and was long past his glory years (which weren't that great).
Not much national prestige was lost in this case.

The point being, Spain has made many pronouncements that they were going to improve their fight against doping, and it doesn't seem to have changed at all.

If Spain catches (and convicts) Xavi, Iniesta, or Nadal, then I will believe that they are making an honest effort.
 
Jul 15, 2013
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Last thing Spain needs is a national scandal like nadal or a footballer. On the contrary they could do with another golden era for public morale
 
Sep 29, 2012
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bewildered said:
Last thing Spain needs is a national scandal like nadal or a footballer. On the contrary they could do with another golden era for public morale
They banned protesting and photographing police. :-/
 
Andynonomous said:
I admit, it was more of a rhetorical question. :p

Of course the Basque cyclist was retired when he was banned, and was long past his glory years (which weren't that great).
Not much national prestige was lost in this case.

The point being, Spain has made many pronouncements that they were going to improve their fight against doping, and it doesn't seem to have changed at all.

If Spain catches (and convicts) Xavi, Iniesta, or Nadal, then I will believe that they are making an honest effort.
ADA Behaviour 101: The Token Bust

Allows you to say to the world "see, we told you we are doing our job, we caught this guy..."
 
Feb 10, 2010
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bewildered said:
Last thing Spain needs is a national scandal like nadal or a footballer. On the contrary they could do with another golden era for public morale
It came out in the Fuentes trial that officials approve banned substances for Fuentes to legally possess-use for 'research.'

Again, the Russian disclosures tell us everything else. It's another national doping program. Be sure to win.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Real Sociedad appeared in the Fuentes files, and their former president subsequently publicly admitted Fuentes had been fuelling their players from 2001-2005.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/football/competitions/la-liga/9847272/Spanish-football-shaken-by-drug-claims-made-by-former-Real-Sociedad-president.html

The allegations involving Real Sociedad are the first serious accusations against Spanish football, with Badiola a credible witness. He gave a wide-ranging interview to a Spanish website on Monday alleging widespread doping before he took over the club and footage was also released showing him in 2008 telling shareholders that Fuentes was heavily involved with the team when they finished second in La Liga in 2002-03, their highest finish since 1988.
I've never heard anything about this ever since.

Note also that Odriozola, president of the Spanish Athletics Federation and one of the key figures in Operation Galgo (which implicated Marta Dominguez and some other medal winning athletes), is still the president.
Ow, and Marta Dominguez got acquitted:D

Now, I think most bigger countries (Germany and Britain included) are characterized by corrupt antidoping efforts, but props to Russia and Spain for making it so damn obvious.
 
Aug 4, 2011
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Spain have no intention of outing any of their most famous athletes for taking PED's. If country's were left to penalise their own sportsman then they would be given the least penalty available " vino comes to mind as an example" because they know the rest of the world have doped athletes and why should they ban their own athletes when other athletes are still competing doped up.

Anyone know what happened to all those blood bags from Puerto?
were they really destroyed?
 
Apr 7, 2011
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Andynonomous said:
Another Spaniard "exonerated" by Spain.

Contador, Valverde, Dominguez, Bezabeh, Heras, destruction of blood bags, abundance of Spanish doping doctors,... Has anything changed in Spain ?

Spain keeps promising that they are changing, yet the protection of it's homegrown dopers continues.
They dropped Mühlegg like a hot potatoe.
He's no real spaniard, of course.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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ray j willings said:
Spain have no intention of outing any of their most famous athletes for taking PED's. If country's were left to penalise their own sportsman then they would be given the least penalty available " vino comes to mind as an example" because they know the rest of the world have doped athletes and why should they ban their own athletes when other athletes are still competing doped up.
True story.

I mean, certain sports federations (UCI springs to mind) do seem to have been suffering from a pro-anglophone bias, target-testing mostly athletes from Slavic and Romance-speaking countries.

I mean, Germany and Britain have no record of exonerating their own athletes comparable to Spain's record, but that's because they've hardly had any athletes testing positive in the first place.
 
Jul 3, 2009
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So are you saying the court's decision wasn't in line with the law..? Seems any doping matter in court which doesn't go against the accused is a rigged. The Spanish criminal and non-analytical system (I realise this is a different matter) is far more active than the Belgian one for example.
 
May 26, 2010
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Dear Wiggo said:
They banned protesting and photographing police. :-/
This was outrageous and a sign that the authorities think worse is to come economically for Spain!
 
Distance runner Angel Mullera was caught exchanging doping plans with his coach over email. He was droppedfrom the '12 Olympic team, but back on the track shortly after. At least he is running much slower now than before...


From
http://forum.cyclingnews.com/showpost.php?p=956250&postcount=163
From 2012 :

The only combat weapon in the hands of the Federation are doping controls,
Spain is about as useful with that weapon as I am with a sling shot.
 
Feb 10, 2010
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Ferminal said:
So are you saying the court's decision wasn't in line with the law..? Seems any doping matter in court which doesn't go against the accused is a rigged. The Spanish criminal and non-analytical system (I realise this is a different matter) is far more active than the Belgian one for example.
This is quite true.

Someone is processing the positives for a variety of athletes likely fully aware Spanish law gives the athlete a way out.
 
Dec 30, 2010
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Ferminal said:
So are you saying the court's decision wasn't in line with the law..? Seems any doping matter in court which doesn't go against the accused is a rigged. The Spanish criminal and non-analytical system (I realise this is a different matter) is far more active than the Belgian one for example.
Clearly national organizations (whether sporting organizations, or civil, or criminal courts) have no business in judging their own athletes. That is a clear conflict of interest. Unfortunately, nations are unwilling to give up this power to judge their own, to international organizations. It seems that the vast majority of doping sanctions against athletes are overturned by the athletes' national organizations/courts.

The Belgian courts "exonerated" two Belgian tennis players for failing to meet their "where-abouts" requirements.

The problem is everywhere to some degree. Some countries are worse than others however.
 
Feb 10, 2010
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Andynonomous said:
Clearly national organizations (whether sporting organizations, or civil, or criminal courts) have no business in judging their own athletes. That is a clear conflict of interest. Unfortunately, nations are unwilling to give up this power to judge their own, to international organizations. It seems that the vast majority of doping sanctions against athletes are overturned by the athletes' national organizations/courts.

The Belgian courts "exonerated" two Belgian tennis players for failing to meet their "where-abouts" requirements.

The problem is everywhere to some degree. Some countries are worse than others however.
Yes, but no.

The IOC does a masterful job with the high-minded idea that Sport Must be Free from Political Interference. It makes doping and corruption fun and easy, while casting the IOC as some sort of benevolent force.

In exchange for "sporting independence" countries get to enable doping programs.
 
May 3, 2010
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sniper said:
True story.

I mean, certain sports federations (UCI springs to mind) do seem to have been suffering from a pro-anglophone bias, target-testing mostly athletes from Slavic and Romance-speaking countries.

I mean, Germany and Britain have no record of exonerating their own athletes comparable to Spain's record, but that's because they've hardly had any athletes testing positive in the first place.
I'd also say that it isn't just Spain that has a **** economy, social problems and a corrupt political elite in need of a golden age to distract people. What's that you say, record gold medal haul in the olympics, knighthoods for successful athletes and their 'architects'... can't think of any other countries that fit the same description.

A fawning toothless media populated by morons and jocksniffing fanboys (hi Dan!)

The UK is basically Spain with **** food and worse weather.

The UK does cover ups nicely, Hayles, CO and her 'forgetfulness'. For the most part they just don't catch anyone so they don't need to cover up. The Spanish mistake is that people keep on getting caught red handed.
 
Jul 21, 2012
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Mrs John Murphy said:
I'd also say that it isn't just Spain that has a **** economy, social problems and a corrupt political elite in need of a golden age to distract people. What's that you say, record gold medal haul in the olympics, knighthoods for successful athletes and their 'architects'... can't think of any other countries that fit the same description.

A fawning toothless media populated by morons and jocksniffing fanboys (hi Dan!)

The UK is basically Spain with **** food and worse weather.

The UK does cover ups nicely, Hayles, CO and her 'forgetfulness'. For the most part they just don't catch anyone so they don't need to cover up. The Spanish mistake is that people keep on getting caught red handed.
good post.
 

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