Is my wheel tensioned properly?

Apr 28, 2010
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Received a rear wheel back from wheelbuilders recently. Last night I noticed that when riding the spoke magnet brushes the computer's receiver on the chainstay, even though when I'm not on it there's about 2mm clearance. Seems a little soft to me, but is this normal for a wheel that'll be used for training as well as racing? I'm 75kg so fairly heavy but not a great big fat track sprinter.
 
Aug 4, 2009
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Roland Rat said:
Received a rear wheel back from wheelbuilders recently. Last night I noticed that when riding the spoke magnet brushes the computer's receiver on the chainstay, even though when I'm not on it there's about 2mm clearance. Seems a little soft to me, but is this normal for a wheel that'll be used for training as well as racing? I'm 75kg so fairly heavy but not a great big fat track sprinter.
Dont sound right I am 85kg not a big fat sprinter either but dont like the sound of that.

I often sit in behind some big guys 6ft6ins tall and weigh in at 110 kg I can see their rear wheels work on the tight corners in a crit but always pull out quickly.

It needs to go back to the wheelbuilder or bike shop.
If you put the wheel on flat ground and stand on the rim either side with both feet dose it move. It shouldnt
 
Roland Rat said:
Received a rear wheel back from wheelbuilders recently. Last night I noticed that when riding the spoke magnet brushes the computer's receiver on the chainstay, even though when I'm not on it there's about 2mm clearance. Seems a little soft to me, but is this normal for a wheel that'll be used for training as well as racing? I'm 75kg so fairly heavy but not a great big fat track sprinter.
Have a decent wheelbuilder check it with a tensionmeter. A wheel shouldn't feel or be 'soft' regardless of what it's used for.
 
Mar 19, 2009
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Roland Rat said:
Received a rear wheel back from wheelbuilders recently. Last night I noticed that when riding the spoke magnet brushes the computer's receiver on the chainstay, even though when I'm not on it there's about 2mm clearance. Seems a little soft to me, but is this normal for a wheel that'll be used for training as well as racing? I'm 75kg so fairly heavy but not a great big fat track sprinter.
Time to find a new wheelbuilder. Shouldn't have to bring it back for more tension, which sounds like that's what you need. If they can't get it right the first time they don't deserve your business.
 
Aug 9, 2010
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Where on the spoke do you have your magnet? 2mm close to the hub will translate into a lot more movement at the rim, so you should be getting brake rub too, unless you have the pads set well away from the rim.

Before you ditch the builder it might be worth having a word with him - he should be able to tune the wheel to suit what you want, although I don't know what precise spec you gave him. If he literally just built up a wheel, with no conversation about tension or use then you can probably resolve the issue without having to find another builder.
 
Apr 28, 2010
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Chuffy said:
Where on the spoke do you have your magnet? 2mm close to the hub will translate into a lot more movement at the rim, so you should be getting brake rub too, unless you have the pads set well away from the rim.
I run a Garmin with cadence/wheel sensor on the chainstay, so around 2-3" from the rim.

Chuffy said:
Before you ditch the builder it might be worth having a word with him - he should be able to tune the wheel to suit what you want, although I don't know what precise spec you gave him. If he literally just built up a wheel, with no conversation about tension or use then you can probably resolve the issue without having to find another builder.
I discussed exactly what I wanted, type of use, type of roads, my weight etc. I've used him 3 times now and I've never been totally convinced. There's a guy who has a shop an hour away who's apparently the king of wheelbuilding in the area, and has done stuff for pro's riding the Ardennes, so I'm going to take the wheels to him and get them sorted out once and for all (might as well have the front checked while I'm going).
 
Aug 9, 2010
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Roland Rat said:
I discussed exactly what I wanted, type of use, type of roads, my weight etc. I've used him 3 times now and I've never been totally convinced. There's a guy who has a shop an hour away who's apparently the king of wheelbuilding in the area, and has done stuff for pro's riding the Ardennes, so I'm going to take the wheels to him and get them sorted out once and for all (might as well have the front checked while I'm going).
Fair enough. They don't sound like bad wheels, just not quite the wheels you want. You're the customer, so go where you can be sure of getting what suits you.

Just out of idle curiosity, who is this master wheelwrangler?
 
Apr 28, 2010
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Apparently "Alan" at Twenty3C did Stannard's wheels for the Ardennes in 2009. As far as I know Stannard didn't die due to a catastrophic wheel failure so that's good enough for me.
 
Chuffy said:
Where on the spoke do you have your magnet? 2mm close to the hub will translate into a lot more movement at the rim, so you should be getting brake rub too, unless you have the pads set well away from the rim.

Before you ditch the builder it might be worth having a word with him - he should be able to tune the wheel to suit what you want, although I don't know what precise spec you gave him. If he literally just built up a wheel, with no conversation about tension or use then you can probably resolve the issue without having to find another builder.
A decent wheelbuilder, after selecting the proper components, should build with the same tension regardless of wheel or use, aluminum rim and stainless steel spokes.
 

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