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Teams & Riders Jonas Vingegaard: The Butterfly Effect

Page 192 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.

Which thread title(s) do you prefer? (you may submit your own)

  • The Chicken who eats Riis for breakfast

    Votes: 32 33.3%
  • When they go low, Vingo high

    Votes: 6 6.3%
  • Wings of Love

    Votes: 8 8.3%
  • The Fishman Cometh

    Votes: 14 14.6%
  • The Mysterious Vingegaard Society

    Votes: 12 12.5%
  • Vingo Star

    Votes: 15 15.6%
  • The Jonas Vingegaard Discussion Thread

    Votes: 29 30.2%
  • Vingegaard vs Roglič

    Votes: 6 6.3%

  • Total voters
    96
  • Poll closed .
Well, the family definitely won't be short on space when they're in Denmark.

24684390-vingegaard-familien-har-kbt-denne-kmpe-villa---o.png


And I can't help but notice how there seems to be quite a distance to the nearest neighbours.
Welcome to the housing magazine

Wonder if he'll use his new hippodrome for improving his bike dirt track skills...
 
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They recently bought it. It cost them 15 million DKK, which is a lot of money to spend on a house you're not even gonna be at for most of the year!
What's the trick? Bad macro-location? Google tells me 16M DKK is 2M EUR and in Slovenia, you would have to try really hard to get a house like that for 2M while Denmark has much higher standard so it should be much more expensive... Or do you have normal real-estate prices by any chance?

Edit: Oh, I see that indeed you do have normal real-estate prices. Average square meter in Denmark is roughly 30% of average gross salary. In Slovenia, it's about 1:1 (2:1 in Ljubljana)...
 
What's the trick? Bad macro-location? Google tells me 16M DKK is 2M EUR and in Slovenia, you would have to try really hard to get a house like that for 2M while Denmark has much higher standard so it should be much more expensive... Or do you have normal real-estate prices by any chance?

Edit: Oh, I see that indeed you do have normal real-estate prices. Average square meter in Denmark is roughly 30% of average gross salary. In Slovenia, it's about 1:1 (2:1 in Ljubljana)...
Yup, in germany 2M for this would also be unthinkable, except for maybe in the remotest east german countryside.
 
What's the trick? Bad macro-location? Google tells me 16M DKK is 2M EUR and in Slovenia, you would have to try really hard to get a house like that for 2M while Denmark has much higher standard so it should be much more expensive... Or do you have normal real-estate prices by any chance?

Edit: Oh, I see that indeed you do have normal real-estate prices. Average square meter in Denmark is roughly 30% of average gross salary. In Slovenia, it's about 1:1 (2:1 in Ljubljana)...

The house had been for sale for 5 years, so it seems that the price wasn't the right one for the area, and Vingegaard might therefore also have paid less for it. If it had faced the North Sea, for instance, it would probably have been more expensive and possibly easier to sell, too.
 
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I understand that, but I would have guessed I house like that in Denmark should be a lot more expensive than 2M EUR. My guess was based on false assumption you guys are as nuts with the housing bubble as we are :)
I think it's hard to compare housing prices between countries tbh. Different rules, different situation, different mentality, etc.. results in big price difference.

I don't know how it works in Denmark, but in Sweden you're only obliged to pay back 50% of your mortgage for example (you keep paying the interest though). The result is that the price is higher, but you actually pay less (but in the end the banks profit).

Anyway, nice house he's having! ;-)
 
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I think it's hard to compare housing prices between countries tbh. Different rules, different situation, different mentality, etc.. results in big price difference.

I don't know how it works in Denmark, but in Sweden you're only obliged to pay back 50% of your mortgage for example (you keep paying the interest though). The result is that the price is higher, but you actually pay less (but in the end the banks profit).

Anyway, nice house he's having! ;-)
Sorry for derailing the thread - but how does that work? If I understand correctly, you return only 50% of the principal but 100% of interests, generated by that principal? What's the benefit of that - assuming that banks just raise interest rates to the point where higher rates just cover the missing 50% principal?
 
Sorry for derailing the thread - but how does that work? If I understand correctly, you return only 50% of the principal but 100% of interests, generated by that principal? What's the benefit of that - assuming that banks just raise interest rates to the point where higher rates just cover the missing 50% principal?
I think he means you can stop paying amortization installments when your mortgage is at 50 % of the value of the house. Or something like that.
If I remember correct, there's also a special way of funding your house n Denmark.
 
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What's the trick? Bad macro-location? Google tells me 16M DKK is 2M EUR and in Slovenia, you would have to try really hard to get a house like that for 2M while Denmark has much higher standard so it should be much more expensive... Or do you have normal real-estate prices by any chance?

Edit: Oh, I see that indeed you do have normal real-estate prices. Average square meter in Denmark is roughly 30% of average gross salary. In Slovenia, it's about 1:1 (2:1 in Ljubljana)...
Location, location, location.
Salling region in Northern Jutland is lower-end real estate price tags, even for nice locations as this one.

You could probably multiply by a factor of 10 if location was just north of Cph...
 
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Sorry for derailing the thread - but how does that work? If I understand correctly, you return only 50% of the principal but 100% of interests, generated by that principal? What's the benefit of that - assuming that banks just raise interest rates to the point where higher rates just cover the missing 50% principal?
Cannot answer on how it works in Sweden, but speaking taking out a residental loan in Denmark, the rules states that you are obliged to put down 15% (edit: at minimum as rules states) of the principal from your own pocket and obtain a loan for the 85% reminder, typically 80% as mortgage loan.

Here, however, there is a jumble of options that the various banks in Denmark offer, incl. party as bank loan and party as mortgage loan.

Quite logically, in terms of interest, it is of course worthwhile to make larger deposits with lower current interest rates, if you have the money.

You can always reschedule your loan, which costs a notable fee.

With the rising interest rates after the introduction of the Ukraine war, it has been worthwhile for many owners to do so, consequently shaving off a large part of the principal by rescheduling to a new loan with a higher interest rate, which you ultimately not notice in day-to-day life, as the new amortization model results in circa the same montly rate - well helped by the fact that you can deduct housing interest from housing taxation.

Edit:
And what is the advantage then?
If interest rates drops again, you will have shaved off a good part of your principal and you can convert again with great economical benefit.
However, this is something the banks in Denmark are quite reluctant to negotiate and demands detailed documentation of robust finances of your private economies and meddle in the details of how the money is used.
One could then say that the banks should just obey costumers wishes, but the reason is that in Denmark there are also a number of types of interest-free loans, which many have been caught in and are now left with very suspended finances, some have even had to sell their house in foreclosure. It is bad for the banks' finances, not to speak of the finances on a national level.
Myself I have a colleague who is caught up in it, and who now offers himself all kinds of extra shifts to get out of his cat pain :p
Fortunately, I have always had a rather difficult time with interest-free loans, and fortunately my wife has the same attitude, so we were able to shave off 33% of out principal in the blink of an eye by converting from 1% mortgage interests to 5%.
(The interest rate on offered mortgage loans even reached as low as 0.5% just before the war in Ukraine broke out, but here it was not worthwhile for us to convert from 1% to 0.5% as the conversion fee would've make out loan more expensive when everything is summed up).

Or the simple option, if you are a multi-millionaire like Jonas:
Just deposit the entire amount in cash as a one-off payment :cool:
 
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Oh so far away okei. Then it wasnt even close apperently, well then I cant lie on the next famiily christmas dinner about that.

I suppose someone from the USA would say it's quite close... around 139 Ks, so... good distance for a PNDKR stage.
Maybe what confused you is that "Salling" is also the name of a retail chain, and we do have one of those in Århus.