Martin Toft Madsens hour record attempt

Re:

RedheadDane said:
I'm just somewhat surprised by the timing/location.
He's doing his hour record attempt in Mexico, with the Tour of Denmark - which he's participating in - starting in less than a week.
I dunno, it's just an hour long TT, and a bunch of altitude training/intervals a week out from a stage race/ Sounds like half reasonable prep.
 
Apr 10, 2011
63
0
0
More data that supports belief that altitude is NOT faster.
What was his gearing, crank length, tires?
Most impressive outing..........great job tacking the line in curves....continues the fine Danish tradition.
Want to hear comments from Ritter, Mogens et al !!!
Le Breton you listening???
 
UncleChainwhip said:
More data that supports belief that altitude is NOT faster.
?

Not sure how you arrive at that conclusion.

Everyone that's made genuine apple with apple attempts at altitude and at sea level(ish) has travelled further at altitude. Indeed Madsen went 1.6km further than his own sea level attempt and this was not well paced (since he paced to break the current record until he cracked), meaning he probably gave up another 0.5km due to imperfect pacing.
 
Apr 10, 2011
63
0
0
Alex,
Not arriving at a conclusion, merely empirical observation.

MTM's form must have been better than his previous hour record, or why start?
His bike was more refined, improvements every year.
No HVAC use, as Aguacalientes is not indoor, think 'Moscow effect'.
No temperature control possible, crazy obsession with air pressure etc....
Less doping prevention in Mexico, further from UCI HQ, ha!
Acclimation problems---last research i read was that aerobic performances after going to altitude are poorest between 3-10 days after arrival---(making St.Eddy's mark done @ Day 5 more impressive, not to mention scorching the 5km mark enroute!).
More experienced with event.
Inherent stress in strange environment.
Jet lag.


Did like how he danced through the red tape with serial physio testing and a dedicated Danish website selling his special components. Confusing this grey area of indoor,low track VS high outdoor track is the oxygen consumption/availability at elevation AND increasing speed/power required---is that sweet spot below 1500 meters?

Still would love to hear comments from a former Danish horse, Orsted ?
Can't wait for the ragrazza in the teacup this September.....
 
May 11, 2009
1,188
0
0
Re:

Hugo Koblet said:
Isn't he supposed to stay above the black line?
He can ride below the black line but above the cote d'azure. Sponges on the turns impede speed if he hits them.
 
Well I've assisted with many hour records, including those having done both altitude and sea level attempts. Hands down altitude is faster. Theoretically, empirically, observationally and with data driven knowledge and understanding. It is better after an acclimation period but even without it is still faster. The physics gain outweighs the physiological loss.

Aguascalientes is indoor - it has a roof sustained via air pressure and air lock to enter/exit, but that's only marginally higher pressure than outside. No temp control but you manage that with time of year and time of day. It's also logistically pretty good for anyone based in America, the track is accessible and does not cost a lot to hire relative to most velodromes and has a better surface than the other option in Colorado Springs which is a smooth concrete surface (and only recently also put on a light roof).

Aguascalientes is easily 2 km/h quicker than say Los Angeles (after accounting for lower power output at altitude).

Climate control of tracks is mostly a northern hemisphere thing to cope with cold winters. In low latitudes and Australia we don't bother, it's just not that cold.

World record hour attempts require anti-doping control and the rider must be in the biopassport program and have a minimum number of controls in the lead up (meaning for an amateur the cost for antidoping alone is circa $10,000). Of course antidoping is not perfect but the lead up testing program and control on the day is the same no matter where you do your attempt.
 
Apr 10, 2011
63
0
0
Bold effort Beukeboom, truly tough ride.
+
Novel scheduling, extensive prep, brought new tech to the fore, continues revived Hour interest, gave credence to a track rider trying this, still averaged over 100rpm, made Madsen look good, provided more data points, advertised altitude track, brought Decker out of hiding, etc...

-
Made a large body rider look disadvantaged, held pole line poorly, revealed ambient conditions psych the whole team, emphasized the huge cost associated with attempts, damage control after media pressure with a set start date, illustrated boring nature of viewing a brief event by not having active feedback with coaching, was expecting more ORANGE!

"Sometimes your the hammer, sometimes your the nail"

Thx for doin it Dion
 
A really good ride by Martin Toft Madsen - 3rd alltime since the new 2014 rules (and 2nd alltime at sea level). He was only 9th at the European TT Championships a week ago (admittedly only a 22 km distance). He was also beaten severely by Asgreen at the Danish TT Championships late July (40 km). So Toft Madsen is perhaps not in his best form? Or maybe more riders than we usually suspect may actually be capable of riding somewhere in the 54-55 km region at sea level?

A few meterological data from dmi.dk:

Odense 13th of August 2019
Air pressure: 1012 hPa
Temperature (outside): 17 degrees Celsius
Humidity (outside): 54 %
Altitude: 13 m

The temperature outside the track is pretty useless, of course. We need to know the temperature (and humidity) inside the arena but it's unknown at this point.
 
Physically, I think there are many riders stronger than Toft Madsen, so yes, potentially many of the current best time trialists should be physically able to ride 54-55 km's. But it takes a dedication that not many will be able to afford in their road programmes (just look at how far away from usual form Campenaerts has been in TT's after his HR-attempt this year). Toft Madsen is a perfectionist who does most things himself with no big budget team to assist, but he can also afford it in his road programme, because the mindset he puts on when preparing for HR attempts is probably not that different from the way he usually prepares for road ITT's (or the daily mindset that he puts on when he's working as an engineer, for that matter).
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY