Matteo Jorgenson is the next Clement Champoissin is the next Aurelien Paret Peintre is the next Nans Peters is the next Pierre Latour

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But my point is that I thought it was Swedish because it ends in 'son', rather than 'sen' (with the ö just disappearing over the years/at some point). However, kristo confirmed that it was indeed originally Danish, ending with 'sen'.
Swedish names usually also has the double "ss" instead of just one s.

It is never an ö in "son" at the end. It is before if it is in the name.

And son literally means "son" in swedish too. That is where the surname derives from back in the day. If the fathers name was Erik. The sons surname would be Eriksson. Like Eriks son. Hence the double ss. Now they dont make surnames like that no more. The family name just continues.
 
Swedish names usually also has the double "ss" instead of just one s.

It is never an ö in "son" at the end. It is before if it is in the name.

And son literally means "son" in swedish too. That is where the surname derives from back in the day. If the fathers name was Erik. The sons surname would be Eriksson. Like Eriks son. Hence the double ss. Now they dont make surnames like that no more. The family name just continues.
I meant it should have been Jörgenson, of course not Jorgensön. Good poin with the double s, though.

And to the others discussing my point of ø not being that hard, you may have points but I still maintain that it wouldn't take more than 10 seconds of concentrated effort to figure out how to open your mouth to make the ø sound, where rolling double r's in Spanish for example require much more practice to master.
 

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