Media assault on Team Sky

Sep 2, 2012
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I loathe the Daily Mail even more than I loathe Murdoch. In this case, however, they are right. Bradley should be ashamed of himself. Jess Ennis for BBC SPOTY.

Now for the Mail to go after all those tax avoiding Tory Party grandees.
 
May 3, 2011
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If its illegal the government should close it down and punish all those involved. If its not you can hardly blame people for trying to save themselves money. The fault is with HMRC not the people involved.
 
Richeypen said:
If its illegal the government should close it down and punish all those involved. If its not you can hardly blame people for trying to save themselves money. The fault is with HMRC not the people involved.
It's a moral, ratyher than a legal issue...though I believe there are moves to close the loophole.
 
Sep 2, 2012
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/othersports/article-2220801/Team-Sky-braced-departures.html?ITO=1490

at least one employee has made strenuous denials about allegations made to The Mail on Sunday by some of his former colleagues.

You can run...

He cannot be named for legal reasons but says those making claims of a secret doping past are doing so because they are 'twisted', 'bitter', 'disillusioned' and 'jealous'.

Where have we heard that before?



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/othersports/article-2220801/Team-Sky-braced-departures.html#ixzz29ux9OKyx
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Aug 27, 2012
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Richeypen said:
If its not you can hardly blame people for trying to save themselves money. The fault is with HMRC not the people involved.
BS and worse expletives! The guy is supposed to be a role model, no? Is that the society we want, where role models teach everyone how to best exploit the system for the individual, and then we blame the system for screwing things up for the collective?

No wonder Europe is going down the toilet.
 
Aug 13, 2010
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Tinman said:
BS and worse expletives! The guy is supposed to be a role model, no? Is that the society we want, where role models teach everyone how to best exploit the system for the individual, and then we blame the system for screwing things up for the collective?

No wonder Europe is going down the toilet.
So assuming you pay tax you never take advantage of any tax breaks? You just pay the top rate of tax on all you earnings even if you don't earn that much, right?
 
May 26, 2010
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Ashenden takes Sky to task.

"There are questions that need to be asked," he said. "They [Sky] have zero tolerance for doping. Great. But what constitutes doping according to them? Is it an anti-doping rule violation? Is it grounds for suspicion? Or are they merely relying on what the athlete tells them?

"Take Sean Yates as an example, who is pertinent because of his prominent links to Armstrong and photos of him arm in arm with 'Motoman' [Armstrong's alleged drugs mule] floating around on the internet. Let me be clear that I don't know if he's doped in the past or not. But if he tells Sky that he hasn't, is that the end of the matter, or do Sky intend to actively investigate what [team leader David] Brailsford calls reputational risks and act on what they find if there are grounds to suspect someone has been associated with doping? It's a really important issue because unless they can qualify their position, their statement isn't worth the paper it's written on. If they intend only to act when a cyclist is sanctioned, they're being disingenuous to their fans."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2012/oct/20/doping-team-sky-cyclin

Ashendin says Journalists need to be

"The media has to be more vigilant this time around. And they must start today. Armstrong fobbed the media off and, with a few brave exceptions – like [the Sunday Times's] David Walsh and Paul Kimmage – they failed to pursue him. Be vigilant and be sceptical."
Some posters, including me, have been sceptical of the sport and so called clean teams. Nice to see someone like Ashenden agreeing.

 
Aug 13, 2010
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Ferminal said:
Bit of a difference between a family trust and moving money "offshore", isn't there?
If they are both legal is there really? People that earn more should certainly pay more but I don't like this whole moral/immoral argument about paying taxes that seems to be doing the rounds in the UK. Most loop holes are there for big business and the UK Government know these and still let them slide. Picking on the odd celeb is a drop in the ocean compared to these companies.
 
Aug 27, 2012
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Don't be late Pedro said:
Picking on the odd celeb is a drop in the ocean compared to these companies.
It's missing the point. Yes to both celebs and big coy's. But what Brad is doing ain't role model behavior. But then again, it's what we would expect from him, so no real surprise at all.
 
Aug 13, 2010
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Tinman said:
It's missing the point. Yes to both celebs and big coy's. But what Brad is doing ain't role model behavior. But then again, it's what we would expect from him, so no real surprise at all.
But I am tax guessing what he is doing is not actually illegal wrt to tax law. So if politicians and papers start judging people on moral grounds as to whether they should pay tax who are the final arbiters? It just becomes subjective.

I would expect anyone in his financial position to pay accountants to minimise their tax payments. And as I asked in a previous post... do you pay tax? Have you ever taken advantage of a tax break?
 
Don Quixote said:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2220787/Bradley-Wiggins-accused-signing-abusive-Cayman-Islands-tax-avoidance-scheme-Bill-Roache.html?ITO=1490

Thought this deserved a new thread, because I imagine this will be just the start - and you can bung all the clippings here.

It should tell DB that the non-Murdoch press have been sniffing Team Sky.

Let's hope he's been sniffing harder, because any foul smells will be spread far and wide now.

Skygate? I hope not.
This is a problem in all countries, some more than others. Rich people see themselves as special, and don't owe their society to contribute their fair share. I think the UK with its banking services and right wing policies are among the worst in this area. And they also have a number of dependencies which are also tax havens.

I don't see Wiggo successfully portraying himself as much of a role model in the future if he ends up as just another rich guy pulling the societal ladder up behind him like so many other rich people do.

However it should be the government that closes this loophole. So far they seem to be focused on millionaires rather than billionaires. The only weapon common people seem to have is moral indignation, and that depends on whether the papers write about it.
 
Feb 17, 2012
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Tinman said:
BS and worse expletives! The guy is supposed to be a role model, no? Is that the society we want, where role models teach everyone how to best exploit the system for the individual, and then we blame the system for screwing things up for the collective?

No wonder Europe is going down the toilet.
If it's legal, I really can't be bothered if Wiggins has found a smart way of saving a few pounds. I would do the same.

This thread shouldn't even be in the clinic btw.
 
Aug 27, 2012
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ToreBear said:
However it should be the government that closes this loophole. So far they seem to be focused on millionaires rather than billionaires.
The challenge that governments have with this type of legislation enactment is that the really wealthy (read billionaires) have loop hole advisors and legal teams way bigger than what government has at their disposal. So most governments do not pursue, as cases are very costly, return on the up front investment is poor and even if a case is won, it will take years to get there. So millionaires and celebs a better bet. Makes sense. And rely on media to paint a bad picture of them as a deterrent to others...
 
bianchigirl said:
In the old days I think it was common for riders to inject themselves with vitamins. Then I think it was more common for team doctors to do so.

I can see how a witness might assume someone doped without him actually doping. If your shot includes testosterone, you might assume that every body else's shot has the same stuff in it.

However the answer the individual gave sounds more like a continuation of the omerta. And if this person signed the document already, I'm becoming a bit more skeptical about what DB is up to.

We will see what happens in the future. DB has certainly given the press plenty to write about in the future.:D
 

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