Millar on BBC about doping

Jul 10, 2010
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http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/hardtalk/9571648.stm


Millar's words all ring true, and sound good. Have we got anybody here who is good at reading the eye movement body language? I'm not good at that, and I know it - I've had friends who were very good at "reading" people that way.

But I notice Millar's eyes are all over - to his right and down, a few times to his right and up, and a very few times to his left. So the words sound good, the voice is sincere - but I wonder it the eyes are telling us a different story.

Regardless - it is nice to hear him and it is a good interview, I think.
 
hiero2 said:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/hardtalk/9571648.stm


Millar's words all ring true, and sound good. Have we got anybody here who is good at reading the eye movement body language? I'm not good at that, and I know it - I've had friends who were very good at "reading" people that way.

But I notice Millar's eyes are all over - to his right and down, a few times to his right and up, and a very few times to his left. So the words sound good, the voice is sincere - but I wonder it the eyes are telling us a different story.

Regardless - it is nice to hear him and it is a good interview, I think.
lol. Are you an expert?
 
Jan 18, 2011
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hiero2 said:
But I notice Millar's eyes are all over - to his right and down, a few times to his right and up, and a very few times to his left. So the words sound good, the voice is sincere - but I wonder it the eyes are telling us a different story.
I am an experimental psychologist, and I study this sort of thing for a living. A failure to maintain eye contact can potentially be interpreted as a sign of deception, but it can also reflect discomfort or cognitive effort. Also, some people rarely make eye contact in social situations, so without accurate baseline measures, there is no way to know if a failure to maintain eye contact is even atypical for a given individual. In general, the direction of gaze is probably not a very informative signal unless you're dealing with someone that you are very familiar with.
 
Oct 30, 2011
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datalore said:
I am an experimental psychologist, and I study this sort of thing for a living. A failure to maintain eye contact can potentially be interpreted as a sign of deception, but it can also reflect discomfort or cognitive effort. Also, some people rarely make eye contact in social situations, so without accurate baseline measures, there is no way to know if a failure to maintain eye contact is even atypical for a given individual. In general, the direction of gaze is probably not a very informative signal unless you're dealing with someone that you are very familiar with.
I think that Millar first got into cycling because he struggled to fit in when he moved somewhere, so joined a cycling club.
 
datalore said:
I am an experimental psychologist, and I study this sort of thing for a living. A failure to maintain eye contact can potentially be interpreted as a sign of deception, but it can also reflect discomfort or cognitive effort. Also, some people rarely make eye contact in social situations, so without accurate baseline measures, there is no way to know if a failure to maintain eye contact is even atypical for a given individual. In general, the direction of gaze is probably not a very informative signal unless you're dealing with someone that you are very familiar with.
Thanks. As other interviews pop up, it would be interesting to read your professional opinions.

This guy can't keep his story straight. At one point it was doping doesn't turn a donkey into a thoroughbred(SP???) and now it is exactly the opposite story told with the same conviction. What will the next story be as we get closer to the Olympics?
 
Mar 18, 2009
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hiero2 said:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/hardtalk/9571648.stm


Millar's words all ring true, and sound good. Have we got anybody here who is good at reading the eye movement body language? I'm not good at that, and I know it - I've had friends who were very good at "reading" people that way.

But I notice Millar's eyes are all over - to his right and down, a few times to his right and up, and a very few times to his left. So the words sound good, the voice is sincere - but I wonder it the eyes are telling us a different story.
I can. It's easy. If Millar's lips are moving then he is lying.

Glad he was caught? Yeah, sure. I bet he is thrilled that his world title is now held by Mick "Freiburg" Rogers. I wonder what those two talk about while riding in the peloton.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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in addition to eyes, hand movements can also be good indicators.
his hands are rather inquiet at the start.
I think he's showing anxiety in that interview mainly in fear that the interviewer might ask him the one question he could never answer truthfully:
"so are you really clean now?"
 
Mar 19, 2009
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sniper said:
I think he's showing anxiety in that interview mainly in fear that the interviewer might ask him the one question he could never answer truthfully:
"so are you really clean now?"
Chance of that happening is actually smaller than getting caught for it.
 
Jul 13, 2010
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sniper said:
in addition to eyes, hand movements can also be good indicators.
his hands are rather inquiet at the start.
I think he's showing anxiety in that interview mainly in fear that the interviewer might ask him the one question he could never answer truthfully:
"so are you really clean now?"
When was the last time that he did a ride that suggested he's on anything stronger than tea??
 
May 31, 2011
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the question i'd like to see asked isn't too millar it's too dave brailsford.

"dave, surely a man with your inside knowledge of cycling would be aware that winning the world tt and the tour prolouge clean in the years miller accomplished these feats would be virtually impossible? bearing that in mind why were you dining with millar when he was arrested?"
 
May 25, 2010
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Ffs, give the guy a break! He did wrong, he was punished, he has been vocally anti doping and the feeling in the Peloton is that he is clean. It's a frank interview, give him a break. We've all done wrong in life, some pay the penalty, but, barring the most heinous of crimes, we all deserve a second chance. This forum is pathetic at times.
 
Feb 22, 2011
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samerics said:
Ffs, give the guy a break! He did wrong, he was punished, he has been vocally anti doping and the feeling in the Peloton is that he is clean. It's a frank interview, give him a break. We've all done wrong in life, some pay the penalty, but, barring the most heinous of crimes, we all deserve a second chance. This forum is pathetic at times.
I didnt say 'don't give the guy a second chance' fair enough everyone is allowed a second chance..

And by the way 'vocally anti doping'...that is BS!!
 
May 25, 2010
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It wasn't aimed solely at you, you were mild :). And you have a point, he has *****footed around the issue to an extent, but he is still in the peloton and has a future to think of. He is clearly anti doping now though, no question, but seems reluctant to speak out against individuals. It will be interesting to see if he opens up when he retires. I do think it is harsh to continue to condemn a rider who has paid the penalty and spoken so openly about his doping since. My cynicism is aimed at the bile and paranoia that seems to ooze from so many on this forum. The air must be thin on that moral high ground that so many seem to occupy, though outside of the confines of an anonymous forum, it would be interesting to see how those individuals translate that to real life :)
 
Feb 22, 2011
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samerics said:
It wasn't aimed solely at you, you were mild :). And you have a point, he has *****footed around the issue to an extent, but he is still in the peloton and has a future to think of. He is clearly anti doping now though, no question, but seems reluctant to speak out against individuals. It will be interesting to see if he opens up when he retires. I do think it is harsh to continue to condemn a rider who has paid the penalty and spoken so openly about his doping since. My cynicism is aimed at the bile and paranoia that seems to ooze from so many on this forum. The air must be thin on that moral high ground that so many seem to occupy, though outside of the confines of an anonymous forum, it would be interesting to see how those individuals translate that to real life :)
True, true :)

Not a chance will he open up, he wants to stay in cycling for a long time according to the interview.. ;)

And one thing about his own doping, he never once named names.. I wouldn't call that too open!
 
Mar 18, 2009
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greatking88 said:
True, true :)

Not a chance will he open up, he wants to stay in cycling for a long time according to the interview.. ;)

And one thing about his own doping, he never once named names.. I wouldn't call that too open!
And he has denounced those who have named names.

Millar is an attention seeking fop. When he was caught his biggest regret was not the ban nor the money. It was losing his position as the darling of the UK cycling press. He found he could regain press coverage by reinventing himself as an anti-doping crusader. He piously castigates others for doing exactly what he did, but numerous statements of his paint a clear picture of one who is most concerned about the appearance of doping rather than the act of doping. To him and his Garmin team it is all about fooling the rubes who watch the sport. This is the guy who called Landis disgusting for telling the press what went on at Postal. If he was truly against doping then he would have been ecstatic.
 
BroDeal said:
And he has denounced those who have named names.

Millar is an attention seeking fop. When he was caught his biggest regret was not the ban nor the money. It was losing his position as the darling of the UK cycling press. He found he could regain press coverage by reinventing himself as an anti-doping crusader. He piously castigates others for doing exactly what he did, but numerous statements of his paint a clear picture of one who is most concerned about the appearance of doping rather than the act of doping. To him and his Garmin team it is all about fooling the rubes who watch the sport. This is the guy who called Landis disgusting for telling the press what went on at Postal. If he was truly against doping then he would have been ecstatic.
Sometimes my friend its what those say to others when the press is not around that matters most.

That's David. He's spoken to a lot of riders knowing full what they were up to & the pressures they felt to provide a way out.

Many in the peloton speak highly of him.... mainly younger riders.
 
Mar 18, 2009
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thehog said:
Sometimes my friend its what those say to others when the press is not around that matters most.

That's David. He's spoken to a lot of riders knowing full what they were up to & the pressures they felt to provide a way out.

Many in the peloton speak highly of him.... mainly younger riders.
Yeah, he can tell them not to get so drunk that you forget to dispose of the evidence and, when you are caught, to never ever name names. The youngsters can learn a lot from Millar's mistakes. They will be able to go forward with confidence, knowing that Millar and the rest of the Garmin boys have their backs and will protect their secrets.
 
It is so frustrating interview. Though I believe that Millar is clean now, I even understand why he beats around the bush, but still, lack of direct questions and direct answers...
 
Feb 23, 2011
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I read Millars book and I think to a certain extent he is seduced by the romanticism of the sport and this is at odds with his anti-doping stance. In the book he recalls a couple of incidents with LA and you get the distinct sense that whilst admiring the man this was at odds with him wanting LA to spill the beans. He has also indicated quite a bit of admiration for Vino.

Riders are crucified for spilling the beans.
The same for keeping their mouths shut
The same for alluding to what goes on without giving any facts

The problem is that Millar knows that if he makes an accusation without proof he could well end up in court and as somebody who previously tested positive his credability is next to nothing. He has allegedly gone broke before and I doubt he wants to be bankrupted by legal fees again if he has to fight a slander/liable/defamation case.
 
May 10, 2009
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To hell with millar. He vilifies landis, yet he admits himself if he wasn't arrested he'd still be doping. Cowardice to kick a man when he's down. Where was this 'courage' in relation to AC. Millar typifies the hypocrisy of cycling.
 
May 26, 2010
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Zam_Olyas said:
Strange analysis is you consider he is supposed to be clean, which would make him the 'white' sheep.

Looking for sympathy. If he feels like that why does he continue to talk about it and not forget about it and just get on with his racing. Seems to be having a sly dig at Sky.
 

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