Number of UCI doping tests dropped strongly

Oct 12, 2012
99
0
0
http://nos.nl/artikel/469383-aantal-tests-uci-sterk-gedaald.html


The number of doping tests from the UCI has fallen sharply in recent years
NOS

The UCI has in recent years performed much less doping controls than intended.

For financial reasons, the number of out-of-competition controls blood tests of 6,711 in 2009 dropped to 2,947 in 2010. In 2011 there were 3,014 inspections.

Mid-June 2010 it was decided in a meeting that the budget would go from 8.4 million Swiss francs (6.3 million euros) to 4.1 million (3,000,000). According to a document of the UCI in the hands of the dutch news (NOS). The UCI did not respond to questions from the NOS.

The number of checks dropped from nearly 7,000 in 2009 to less than 3,000 in 2010. Because the reliability of the blood passport depends on as many controls as possible, this drastic decline opens the door for cyclists who want to evade control. It is made easy for them, as the number of checks is more than halved.

Less checks for older riders
The lack of financial means in the UCI, makes the biomedical passport (commonly called blood passport) essentially useless. It also shows the UCI is focussing on controlling young riders due to the lack of proper funding. 'Older' riders are deliberatly controlled less - as evidenced by the UCI document -.

The UCI started with the control of blood passports in 2007. In that year, 406 riders were checked out-of-competition ". In subsequent years, the number of inspections rose from 4,649 in 2008 to 6,711 in 2009. At that time the federation however was forced to rethink its steps, because the budget for the doping controls was rapidly running out.
In 2010, the UCI halved the budget for doping controls. Thus the number dropped to 2,947 tests. A year later, in 2011, the number of checks practically equal: 3014.

Platoon knew of reduced checks
Already in 2011, Gérard Vroomen, former manager of the Cervelo cycling team said: the number of checks in 2010 is much less compared to before. He hears from riders that they are barely checked, and writes this on his blog. This results in an angry statement from the UCI, which labels Vroomen's comments as "misleading" and "irresponsible".

Iwan Spekenbrink, manager of Argos-Shimano, now admits that the number of checks has indeed been drastically reduced. Some riders of his team were in 2012 only checked twice. "The fewer controls, the less reliable the blood passport. We need much more checks, if we want the sport doping free."

Passport in other sports

The blood passport was introduced in 2000 by several international sports federations to monitor athletes hematocrit values. Too strong a deviation allowed for the athlete to be suspended. Cycling followed in 2008.

Claudia Pechstein (skating), Franco Pellizotti and Igor Astarloa (both cycling) are some athletes that were suspended for abnormal values ​​in the passport .
 
Oct 16, 2010
19,912
1
0
Good article.

More damage to the passport.

The article says the bloodpassport is basically useless with this amount of testing.

DS of Argos-Shimano (Proteam, hence eligible for the BP) is cited saying some of his riders were tested only twice throughout 2012.
 
Dazed and Confused said:
so targeted testing. Decided by who and what process? Let me guess. Hein and his gang using Tarot cards.
The who decides is the problem. It should be the people in charge of the Anti doping program, but if they are influenced by Hein & Pat, it's useless.
Anne Gripper was in charge for some time.

Usually, people under suspicion, are tested more and there is nothing wrong in that if that's done fairly.
 
May 26, 2010
28,144
2
0
Dazed and Confused said:
so targeted testing. Decided by who and what process? Let me guess. Hein and his gang using Tarot cards.
Not tarot cards, brown envelopes.
 
rickshaw said:
http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/uci-performed-no-blood-tests-during-amgen-tour-of-california

Let's not forget No blood testing at all in the ToC that year.

"Last month, (Sept 2011) Michael Ashenden told Cyclingnews that he had seen several gaps in biological profile tests carried out by the UCI. He did admit that this may have been due to target testing, but said he had not been made aware of any such plans by the UCI."
ToC '11

What a performance by the two old men from Radioshack. Just like the good old days.
 

Daniel Benson

Administrator
Moderator
Mar 2, 2009
683
0
0
Good info. When we wrote that Tour of cali article in 2011 we got a call asking 'why are you always after us?'. It wasnt' from the race. The drop in the number of tests is an important topic though.

What struck me most was the fact that even though the UCI's coffers were low, they had the chance to work with USADA, who were willing to run out of comp/in comp tests. UCI still said no.
 
May 3, 2010
2,662
0
0
the asian said:
The who decides is the problem. It should be the people in charge of the Anti doping program, but if they are influenced by Hein & Pat, it's useless.
Anne Gripper was in charge for some time.

Usually, people under suspicion, are tested more and there is nothing wrong in that if that's done fairly.
Agree totally. My guess is that Gripper would argue that it is 'targeted testing' which is a better use of resources. Whether that was actually the case, or rather it was about avoiding positives.

I know that tennis has produced data giving the number of OOC tests that players received - ie the Williams' having no OOC 2009-2010. I wonder if data exists for cycling. It would be interesting to see who they were testing and if they were target testing?
 
Daniel Benson said:
Good info. When we wrote that Tour of cali article in 2011 we got a call asking 'why are you always after us?'. It wasnt' from the race. The drop in the number of tests is an important topic though.

What struck me most was the fact that even though the UCI's coffers were low, they had the chance to work with USADA, who were willing to run out of comp/in comp tests. UCI still said no.
Hi Daniel,

There was an explicit plan, and some documentation of actual tests, that confirmed both intent and practice following the intro of the BP to cut back on OOC tests.

I have been doing some searching, but haven't yet located the specific documents.

A further observation on testing statistics is the relatively small number of CERA tests that were conducted during this time frame. Only 851 CERA tests were conducted of 5709 Blood Tests in 2009, where the 5709 tests were less than the 6350 Planned. As we know, CERA was the new problem but where a test existed, it was not applied.

The experience at the ToC that you have cited - and thank you for the additional background - should be held in the context of the TdF testing as well.

Please recall that the WADA Independent Observer Report for the 2010 Tour de France noted a number of troubling aspects with the implementation of the testing, including the lack of follow up on targeted cyclists.

"During the Tour, a number of riders demonstrating suspicious profiles and/or showing significantly impressive performances at the Tour were tested on surprisingly few occasions and for three riders of interest did not provide a blood sample for the purposes of anti-doping in the whole Tour...

...It is noted ... that only 70% of the UCI’s analysis were for EPO, and it was outlined that the budget was the main constraint for not doing more EPO testing. Moreover, only a reasonably small number of blood samples were collected for analysis for CERA, HBOC or HBT and it is unknown to the IO Team how many (if any) blood passport samples were later analysed for any of these substances.

There are also new substances and/or methods that can now be detected or suspected, yet the UCI only sent ten target test samples to the WADA-Accredited Laboratory of the German Sports University, Cologne, for additional analysis for new substances and/or methods. As a way of illustrating this, during the Tour it leaked in the media that the authorities of the country of one of the competing riders had just initiated an investigation against the rider to examine doping allegations. Information which appeared on the media linked the rider with the use of a new drug, which is prohibited in sport. The IO Team did not observe any attempt to target test this rider for the new prohibited substance."


In addition to their concerns, there were a number of Recommendations that are arguably surprising due to their obvious nature:

-During the Tour screens should routinely include EPO analysis.
-The UCI should consider the benefits of implementing a Steroid Profiling Programme
- DCOs should not disclose whether other riders are scheduled for testing during the same mission or that day
- Chaperones/DCO’s proceed straight to the riders’ room and notify the rider and only then proceed to the team doctor’s room and advise him of such testing

Ultimately, what is the point of a BP program if you aren't doing the basics?

Dave.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
masking_agent The Clinic 12
B The Clinic 2
D The Clinic 10

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts