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Post suspension performance

May 11, 2009
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During yesterdays versus coverage of the Liege-Bastogne-Liege, and after Vinokourov won it, Bob Roll asked the question "how come racers that come back from a suspension perform so well?" (or words to that effect).

The AAAS Science Journal had one possible answer (I don't have the issue to hand but it was shortly before the Beijing Olympics); there is no evidence that many of the proscribed products and practices enhance performance, in fact they may even degrade performance, or have no effect at all. Apparently, when a substance or practice is rumored to being used by athletes, then that substance or practice is added to the proscribed list without any scientific research being conducted.
 
May 13, 2009
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avanti said:
During yesterdays versus coverage of the Liege-Bastogne-Liege, and after Vinokourov won it, Bob Roll asked the question "how come racers that come back from a suspension perform so well?" (or words to that effect).

The AAAS Science Journal had one possible answer (I don't have the issue to hand but it was shortly before the Beijing Olympics); there is no evidence that many of the proscribed products and practices enhance performance, in fact they may even degrade performance, or have no effect at all. Apparently, when a substance or practice is rumored to being used by athletes, then that substance or practice is added to the proscribed list without any scientific research being conducted.

Of course it is. What do you suggest? We do a study first? Beside the obvious, delay in getting stuff banned, you're not getting any such study through the ethics committee.
 
May 3, 2010
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avanti said:
The AAAS Science Journal had one possible answer (I don't have the issue to hand but it was shortly before the Beijing Olympics); there is no evidence that many of the proscribed products and practices enhance performance

Not too sure about that one. Go donate a pint of blood, head out for a hard ride the next day and then try to tell me EPO doesn't work :)
 
Mar 18, 2009
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The placebo effect. Foxy Brown talked about it a long time ago in another thread. It exists and its true for many products, but not EPO and blood transfusions to the best of my knowledge.
 
May 11, 2009
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Cobblestones said:
Of course it is. What do you suggest? We do a study first? Beside the obvious, delay in getting stuff banned, you're not getting any such study through the ethics committee.

Actually that is one of the problems stated by Science Journal - how can you do a blind drug test on competitive athletes - impossible.
 
Not a controlled study, but Outside Online published the best article i've seen on the subject. "Anti-aging doctor"....

What is good about the "experiment" is different approaches were compared, rather than just comparing post-treatment to pre-treatment.

It may well be true some items on the prohibited list have marginal efficacy, but it clearly is not the case that an aggressive doping program is ineffective, especially when countering the depleting effects of a 3-week stage race.