random cycling facts

Quite often I realize something completely random about cycling which doesn't really fit to a topic but I still feel the need to post about it. This is a place for stuff like that. Don't know if anyone else needs this thread, but I do :D

For example today, I was thinking about about the fact that although right now a lot of young gc riders are getting hyped, only a few really end up winning grand tours, or even getting podiums. For example right now there are only 7 active grand tour winners and two of them, Valverde and Cunego, are already so old that they could be the fathers of some young pros. Moreover, if I didn't forget someone there are also only 16 active riders who have been on a GT podium, so those guys are really pretty rare. So I thought, it's statistically probably rather unlikely that Bernal and Gaudu who were born with just a few months between each other would both become serious gt contenders. Then I was thinking again and realized, Froome and Nibali, the most successful active gt riders were also born with only a few months between, and then I realized the other three active gt winners who aren't in their late thirties were actually all three born in 1990 (Dumoulin, Quintana, Aru). So at that point I was starting to look at the podium finishers and I realized, of the 16 active riders who have been on a gt podium, 6 were born in 1990 and on top of that 3 more were born late 1989 (September or later) which means that of the 16 active riders with gt podiums 9 were born in a time span of 15 months. In the 15 months prior to that, not one single gt podium. At the same time, no active rider who has been on a gt podium was born after Tom Dumoulin who is already 27. How on earth is that possible? I can't be the only one amazed by that, right?
 
staubsauger said:
Parker said:
Probably the UK's two most successful male road racers ever (Froome and Cavendish) were born on consecutive days
Both haven't been born in the UK either!
Likewise Wiggins and D.Millar.

Similar with the Irish riders. None of Roche (France), Bennett (Belgium) Martin, Dunne, Mullen or Brammeier (all England) were born there - only Phil Deignan and Eddie Dunbar were.
 
While Froome and Cav were born on consecutive days, I just realized the forum threads of the two men who battled for victory in Romandie were created on consecutive days. If someone had told me back then they would be the two strongest riders in a big WT stage race just two years later I definitely would not have believed that. :D
 
The 1986 Peace Race started with three stages around Kiev, only a few days after the Chernobyl disaster. As a result, most of the western teams pulled out, and many nominated riders for Eastern Bloc teams were issued with implicit ultimatums if they didn't ride, even though when they raced the prologue, people in hazmat suits were hosing down the streets to be used on the day and people were routinely checking the course during the reconnaissance not with stopwatches but with geiger counters.

One of the Czech team even missed the birth of his first child, born that very day. His name was Roman Kreuziger. So was his son's.
 
Re:

Libertine Seguros said:
The 1986 Peace Race started with three stages around Kiev, only a few days after the Chernobyl disaster. As a result, most of the western teams pulled out, and many nominated riders for Eastern Bloc teams were issued with implicit ultimatums if they didn't ride, even though when they raced the prologue, people in hazmat suits were hosing down the streets to be used on the day and people were routinely checking the course during the reconnaissance not with stopwatches but with geiger counters.

One of the Czech team even missed the birth of his first child, born that very day. His name was Roman Kreuziger. So was his son's.
Now this is the real stuff
 
One of cycling's unsolved x-files is the stage 15b individual time trial of the 1981 Vuelta..

It took place on a city circuit that criss-crossed and the course may or may not have been properly marked depending on which side of the story you believe.

This reasonable rider with a couple of good wins from breakaways but nothing major, who was certainly no time trialist, set the fastest time by 39 seconds. He had no idea he'd gone fast and he'd even crashed.

Some theorized he'd gotten up from the crash and ridden down the wrong route.....except he was followed by a support car and a commissaires car and the people in both cars said he rode the correct route. Also that he didn't hold on to the car.

The timekeepers were sure they hadn't made a mistake, and apparently had backup timekeeping that also showed the same time.

In the end, the Miko-Mercier team made such a stink that 2 minutes were added to his time. In those days at the Vuelta whatever the foreigners wanted they got. So, of course Miko-Mercier rider Regis Clere was promoted to 1st place with the stage win. Some sources refuse to credit Clere with the win.

Did he win honestly? We still don't know what happened.

Recently he became president of the spanish federation, headed the organization of the 2014 worlds and has held posts with the UCI.

edit: and i forgot his name. duh. Jose Luis Lopez Cerron
 
The fastest ever Giro d'Italia Femminile was the 2004 edition, which featured a mountain TTT to Leukerbad and an MTF at Madonna del Ghisallo and was won by Nicole Cooke. The average speed of the race was 39,563km/h.

This was in fact faster than that year's men's Giro d'Italia, despite no fewer than 11 sprint stages (9 won by Petacchi, 1 each by McEwen and Rodriguez), which was won by Damiano Cunego at an average speed of 38,610km/h. It was also faster than that year's Vuelta a España, with Roberto Heras' victory coming at an average of 39,060km/h. The women couldn't compete with the Tour de France, however, which Lance Armstrong originally won at an average of over 41km/h.
 
Re:

Libertine Seguros said:
The fastest ever Giro d'Italia Femminile was the 2004 edition, which featured a mountain TTT to Leukerbad and an MTF at Madonna del Ghisallo and was won by Nicole Cooke. The average speed of the race was 39,563km/h.

This was in fact faster than that year's men's Giro d'Italia, despite no fewer than 11 sprint stages (9 won by Petacchi, 1 each by McEwen and Rodriguez), which was won by Damiano Cunego at an average speed of 38,610km/h. It was also faster than that year's Vuelta a España, with Roberto Heras' victory coming at an average of 39,060km/h. The women couldn't compete with the Tour de France, however, which Lance Armstrong originally won at an average of over 41km/h.
What a whack Giro that was. God what a mess the 2004 GT routes must have been - the Tour wasn't much better if any in that aspect. The Giro-route was probably better.

What I would have payed to make you analyze and grade those routes back in the day. A completed score by under 4/20 wouldn't surprise me at all, probably even lower.
 

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