Rob Hatch

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Top level cycling is after all not among the most challenging sports when it comes to pronounciation for European commentators, they don't likely get any further than Estonian vowel clashes, some Eritrean name trains here and there and that's all, no serious 2.2 continental level Thai, Mongolian, Malagasy, or Vietnamese real challenges for example.
 
I don't want to dwell on the Anglo-Saxons, as some of them are really nice people :shortcake:, but from my experience it's really common for them to anglify foreigner's first names especially - Luciana becomes Lucy, Matthias Matt. I haven't experienced this in other languages as much, although sometimes Chinese or Thai for instance in Germany change their name themselves so that they won't feel like an outsider so much and their name doesn't constantly get butchered. It's actually sad, I'd rather make the effort to pronounce them (half-)correctly.
Thai people use nicknames instead of legal names because, so that could be one reason for changing the name. For example, I've known people for 10 years+ without knowing their legal name. While I know my kid's legal names, I've never once addressed them by it. Thai formal names are really long and aren't even really like normal Thai speech.

Back to the subject, I do think it would make sense to Anglify Paris-Roubaix. It would sound a lot cooler as PAIR-Iss ROO-Bikes.
 
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Although I am not great with accents and pronunciations, I do try to pronounce words as done in the original language, with some exceptions, like Paris. I realized the other day how inconsistent I was when I heard someone on GCN pronounce AG2R La Mondiale. I realized I have been pronouncing La Mondiale like a French word, but the AG2R as in English. Good thing I'm not a commentator.
 
Thai people use nicknames instead of legal names because, so that could be one reason for changing the name. For example, I've known people for 10 years+ without knowing their legal name. While I know my kid's legal names, I've never once addressed them by it. Thai formal names are really long and aren't even really like normal Thai speech.

Back to the subject, I do think it would make sense to Anglify Paris-Roubaix. It would sound a lot cooler as PAIR-Iss ROO-Bikes.
Same with some of my Filipino coworkers. I think their "legal name" is what they go by and it's shortened or not even close.
 

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Ah, now that you mention it, I remember reading previously that you are Danish too.

Too bad for all the “Danes” from Sydslesvig. I don’t think the long running debate here in Denmark about what it takes to be Danish has been concluded, certainly not with that method prevailing ...
I will make it very short: we are all related.
Hi long not known relatives!
Hi cousins!
 
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MTV

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This reply is very aggressive for no good reason

No where did the poster demand that foreign names be pronounced incorrectly or was 'are not bothered by the pronunciation' . You seem to be projecting

Replies on here show how little was understood and calling the poster a Brexiter and mocking them is doing everything some are pointing the finger at in the OP but in the opposite direction

Here's the thing you can pronounce names correctly without going overboard in the delivery
You can say Vincenzo Niabli correctly without saying V-I-N-C-E-N-Z-O N-I-B-A-L-I in an over the top way at every turn .

Just like I can say "The computer says no " in English correctly without saying it like David Walliams in Little Britain

Rob Hatch is not easy to follow for some people not because of his pronunciation (although he gets names wrong as other have stated . So is he really doing loads of homework to get it right or he just pronouncing names correctly for the languages he speaks ?. ) . Its his delivery .

Sure it is better to pronounce peoples names correctly but Hatch exaggerated names , changes his voice , sounds unnatural half the time and its nothing to do with pronunciation. There are other commentators pronouncing names correctly (though not all ) and I prefer everyone of them to Hatch

It hard for some people to follow him . He doesnt flow , he e grates. . This is the view of many people . Trying to make out anyone who has a problem as some sort of lesser European with Brexit views is ridiculous and is just trying to belittle people who dont agree with you

I have listened to Spanish and French commentators and no problem with languages . Just listening to a Spanish rider at present being interviewed in English and her pronunciation and language is easy to follow
OI dear,
I like Rob.
I can follow him just fine.
That's all.
About the cat it is downstairs.
 
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I just googled as his voice is hard to place accent wise to find out where he was from (Blackburn FWIW), and found this quote in an interview which elicited a chuckle
He's from Accrington, just outside Blackburn (he's a Blackburn Rovers fan).

This means off camera he speaks with a stronger Lancashire accent, which includes dropping Hs (I've heard him speak in his normal accent). So ironically, when Rob Hatch says the name 'Rob Hatch' on TV, he probably isn't pronouncing it like the authentic Rob Hatch
 
He's from Accrington, just outside Blackburn (he's a Blackburn Rovers fan).

This means off camera he speaks with a stronger Lancashire accent, which includes dropping Hs (I've heard him speak in his normal accent). So ironically, when Rob Hatch says the name 'Rob Hatch' on TV, he probably isn't pronouncing it like the authentic Rob Hatch
often, when he comes back on after his tea break he forgets his commentator voice and speaks in his gradely accent. Usually when excitedly discussing food
 
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Incidentally, apparently the most mispronounced town in Britain is Frome. Cycling fans might be able a have a crack at it



But be warned your usual preface of "I'm not a fan but" isn't part of the town's name
Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch has to take the cake. Whatever the town namers were thinking when they made this we will never know.

Better that than a clinic preface.
 
If the ø is always pronounced like the u in burn then, once that's learned, most people could handle it (I don't know if it is?).
Øh, hø & høj have three different sounds.
I'm not sure if you're just being deliberately obtuse here - but those places have English exonyms that have been taken into common parlance and Fribourg hasn't. To be even more specific, Milan is the name for Milano in Lombard language so our name for it probably stems from that; and the silent 's' in French (as in Paris) was only developed in the middle ages so perhaps the pronunciation is derived from the old French style that or just from seeing it written rather than spoken.

Exonyms are probably more common in other European languages as border areas and hinterlands see lots of crossover in language - it would be normal for an Italian to call Zürich 'Zurigo', a German to call Geneva 'Gänf/Genf' or a French person to call Basel 'Bâle'. Here's a wikipedia page with all English exonyms which you can see all of the place names if you're still confused with anything else https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_exonyms
In Danish, many exonyms are slowly dying. While next to no one uses Kalaallit Nunaat for Grønland (Greenland), Nuuk is always used nowadays instead of Godthåb. And while the capitol of Italy is Rom, we don't use Florens for Firenze (Florence) any longer. The majority of exonyms in Danish are from German, but after 1864 and especially 1940 we are more oriented towards English. So Ægypten becomes Egypten.
 

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