Running-thread

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Re:

Semper Fidelis said:
Sad to say that all my PR's were set when I was 20 to 24.
(5k 14:32) (10k 30:46) cant remember my half. full Marathon 2:28:53---- Unless I cheat like some of Iron Man folks I have read about then my PR's are done and dusted.

Boston just like all other Marathons has its pro's and con's.

Chicago I hear from previous training partners that it is good.

What used to be many mid sized races that offered multiple distances in the same race are all much to large now. Austin for example was a very good small to mid sized event now it is a monster. Same goes for Houston.
Mardi Gras marathon used to be one of my favorites until the Rock and Roll crap came along. They ruined it for me. It is a business now I get it. AnyWho rant is over.

It is addictive, just depends on how much you let it get ya.
Decent PR's dude.
 
Re:

djpbaltimore said:
I quit running organized events a few years ago as my collection of race shirts was getting excessive.
I had to larf at this... most of my t-shirts come from the Turkey Stuffer 5k. (It's a local fun run on the morning of Thanksgiving Day - lots of people still show up for it, though, some even wear costumes.) But now that my t-shirts are all falling apart I may have to run the Turkey Stuffer again. (Hung up my running shoes about 10 years ago.)

Hotdamn, this thread is making want to run again, not sure how well the knees and shins will hold up, though. Oh, who cares? Given enough encouragement I may just feel the need for speed again and get my running shoes out!

Speaking of shoes - I was always partial to Asics Gels, but one time I got a pair of some kind of a Nike shoe as gift, they seemed to fit pretty well as well. (Everybody is different in this regard, though, I realize that.)
 
Re: Re:

King Boonen said:
Archibald said:
Tricycle Rider, I like to get out and see as much as I can, that's why I always did long distances/trail running etc. It's also why I now ride bikes much more instead.
Meant to reply to this earlier - I like the bike because it gets you further faster. You get to see more stuff. But running is so much less maintenance in that you don't have to worry about the bike. (Checking the tire pressure, checking the brakes, getting all dressed for the weather before you ever leave the house, etc.) With running you just throw on a pair of decent shoes and off you go!

Both activities have their own merits, though, so whatever rings your bell is cool by me.
 
Re:

Tricycle Rider said:
Running certainly can be addictive, I always loved the runner's high. (I think there's been some questions lately as to whether such a thing exists, or why it does, but I'm pretty sure whatever it is I've felt it.)
serotonin (endorphins) release that occurs about 35-45mins into medium intensity exercise/activity

Tricycle Rider said:
Speaking of shoes - I was always partial to Asics Gels, but one time I got a pair of some kind of a Nike shoe as gift, they seemed to fit pretty well as well. (Everybody is different in this regard, though, I realize that.)
used to use Asics a while back - quality runners.
I switched after a podiatrist informed me that my foot pronation wasn't the same as everyone else (well the 5% of humans that roll outwards). Been using Brooks ever since, and only the one model that suits my feet - made a massive difference from the first use and never looked back
 
Dec 7, 2010
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Re: Re:

Tricycle Rider said:
Jspear said:
Decent PR's dude.
You guys seem to be so serious about your PRs. Was there any money, or contracts, at stake here?
While PR's are different than most, I still think about the good ole days. And maybe the good OLD days to come.

In my hay day. I did not have to pay for any entry or travel. Was given free shoes and gear. Was on a club corporate team for ekiden's and marathons while living in Japan. Does that count?
 
Dec 7, 2010
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Re: Re:

King Boonen said:
Tricycle Rider said:
Jspear said:
Decent PR's dude.
You guys seem to be so serious about your PRs. Was there any money, or contracts, at stake here?
Based on the times no. Semper was quick, but very good club runner quick rather than turning pro quick.
My real goal back then - No joke was to run 2:22 in order to qualify to show up for the Olympic trials in the United States. Never even got close. 6 min might well have been 1 hour because I was never able to do the training required. I done really good training but back then the info I had was purely what I was told by training friends or the occasional "coach".
 
Dec 7, 2010
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Re: Re:

Jspear said:
Tricycle Rider said:
Jspear said:
Decent PR's dude.
You guys seem to be so serious about your PRs. Was there any money, or contracts, at stake here?
Can't speak for Semper Fidelis, but yes PR's are important! :cool: Me being better than my mates is just as important as AC beating Froome. Money or no money. :p
Even now without having competed in a very long time, I still will be looking at age group times for the 45-50year olds when I toe the line come next year for my first marathon in well over 10 years.
 
Semper where you 5k and 10k times on the track, they are really high quality times, I did a 1:33 half marathon in the great North Run in my late 20s and a 4.40 1500m in my early twenties though I had a long spell between hardly running at all, my only Marathon was the Edinburgh when I was 47, my training was interrupted towards the end with a niggling injury and after feeling good at the start I hit the wall at 18 miles and finished around 4 hours 25 minutes, having done the first 10k in 48 minutes and 1h 50 minutes at the half marathon point. Never had a wall experience like it on a bike.

Also Semper how many miles a week where you doing at your prime
 
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del1962 said:
Semper where you 5k and 10k times on the track, they are really high quality times, I did a 1:33 half marathon in the great North Run in my late 20s and a 4.40 1500m in my early twenties though I had a long spell between hardly running at all, my only Marathon was the Edinburgh when I was 47, my training was interrupted towards the end with a niggling injury and after feeling good at the start I hit the wall at 18 miles and finished around 4 hours 25 minutes, having done the first 10k in 48 minutes and 1h 50 minutes at the half marathon point. Never had a wall experience like it on a bike.

Also Semper how many miles a week where you doing at your prime
The 5k was on a track. The 10k was a point to point road course in Japan.

Your 1500 time proves you have speed. The hardest thing in the world to do is train properly for running. That is why there are so many of these low mileage gimmicks out in the running world that people will pay to join.

I would run 80 miles a week in my base training for the marathon. But my average was about 65 to 75 depending on the point in training and what my focus was on. I was and still am a big believer in mileage = results. Many people today will tell you that is a recipe for injury. My answer to that is everyone is truly different but to be a runner who want to either pretend to be serious or be serious you need mileage. I never have been injured in my running lifetime. I started running when I was 14 and i'm 47 about to be 48.

Back in the day when I was a bit more brash I would say to folks who said that tooooo many miles will get you injured ,,,, I would come back and say how do you know? Have you ever tried high mileage? My opinion has changed a bit because I have meet many people who based on actual talent should not be running but they still manage to get in some quality training and enjoy running.

You should do another marathon. That is a good time and considering you had never experienced "the wall" it is a humbling experience. I had ran about 30 marathons before I had ever truly hit the wall. It was one of the times that I actually thought why would anyone try to run through this.

I have never hit the wall in cycling but I have had cramps so bad that I had to stop and walk. That was very similar to the wall in running.
 
Thanks for the reply Semper, from what I remember my mileage when younger maxed out at about 50 miles a week, though this would only be briefly not over a long period, but the improvements at that mileage where great, I read the book running the Lydiard way (I think that was its name) which helped, though I don't think mileage is the only thing, Interval training is important to run faster. I kind of agree with you on injuries and mileage with the proviso that mileage and intensity is build up gradually, most of my problems have come from trying to return from a layoff to quickly, I would like to do a Marathon again just to do it without walking towards the end as I don't feel I truly completed it, but I am now 54 and not getting any younger and prefer riding a bike now.
 
Re: Re:

Semper Fidelis said:
In my hay day. I did not have to pay for any entry or travel. Was given free shoes and gear. Was on a club corporate team for ekiden's and marathons while living in Japan. Does that count?
Yes, I think you qualified for doping control. :p

No entry fees... I don't know what such a thing is. Aside from the pro races like the Prefontaine Classic we have lots of charity races here in Track Town, USA, I think they're a blast. The running culture is so huge here - some people take their racing very seriously (the ones who are constantly checking their watches like Froome checks his power meter), others are there just for the fun of if. But either way we amateurs all have to pay for our entry.
 
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Re: Re:

Tricycle Rider said:
Semper Fidelis said:
In my hay day. I did not have to pay for any entry or travel. Was given free shoes and gear. Was on a club corporate team for ekiden's and marathons while living in Japan. Does that count?
Yes, I think you qualified for doping control. :p

No entry fees... I don't know what such a thing is. Aside from the pro races like the Prefontaine Classic we have lots of charity races here in Track Town, USA, I think they're a blast. The running culture is so huge here - some people take their racing very seriously (the ones who are constantly checking their watches like Froome checks his power meter), others are there just for the fun of if. But either way we amateurs all have to pay for our entry.
Pre is in my mind a great story and someone who was a rock star. I came along in life a little after that.

Doping controls? whats that?

Just for fun or just to race both are a good exercise. Wish I lived somewhere on the North West coast or Flagstaff AZ. Running in AZ is a blast.
 
Re: Re:

Semper Fidelis said:
Tricycle Rider said:
Pre is in my mind a great story and someone who was a rock star. I came along in life a little after that.

Doping controls? whats that?

Just for fun or just to race both are a good exercise. Wish I lived somewhere on the North West coast or Flagstaff AZ. Running in AZ is a blast.
Pre is such a legend and mythological figure here in Eugene, his legacy heavily contributes to the popularity of running in this area. (Have a couple of Pre posters on my wall and have the "Stop Pre" t-shirt myself.)

The Pre Classic is so popular with the pros, it's amazing the world championships haven't been held here up until now. I know it's because of logistics (or politics), but still, if there's a pro race or pro meet in Eugene you know people will show up for it. (I'm always kinda amazed and kinda sad when I see the seats practically empty at big races being held in New York or somewhere in the Midwest, the running culture just isn't there.)
 
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Re: Re:

Tricycle Rider said:
Semper Fidelis said:
Tricycle Rider said:
Pre is in my mind a great story and someone who was a rock star. I came along in life a little after that.

Doping controls? whats that?

Just for fun or just to race both are a good exercise. Wish I lived somewhere on the North West coast or Flagstaff AZ. Running in AZ is a blast.
Pre is such a legend and mythological figure here in Eugene, his legacy heavily contributes to the popularity of running in this area. (Have a couple of Pre posters on my wall and have the "Stop Pre" t-shirt myself.)

The Pre Classic is so popular with the pros, it's amazing the world championships haven't been held here up until now. I know it's because of logistics (or politics), but still, if there's a pro race or pro meet in Eugene you know people will show up for it. (I'm always kinda amazed and kinda sad when I see the seats practically empty at big races being held in New York or somewhere in the Midwest, the running culture just isn't there.)
I made the trip to Eugene in the mid 80's and ran on the track!

It is The place to be for running. I have the t-shirt which my cousin gave me back in the 70's. Not sure where they got it from because back then ,,,,,there was no interwebs.

I agree about the world championships. That place lives eats and breathes running.
 
Re: Re:

Semper Fidelis said:
Tricycle Rider said:
I made the trip to Eugene in the mid 80's and ran on the track!

It is The place to be for running. I have the t-shirt which my cousin gave me back in the 70's. Not sure where they got it from because back then ,,,,,there was no interwebs.

I agree about the world championships. That place lives eats and breathes running.
I got my shirt and my posters at the Pre Classic meets years ago, back then the posters were free. (Now I think you have to order them online and actually pay.) But, the atmosphere at Hayward is just so electrifying.. the crowd starts stomping their feet, we clap for the high and long jumpers in rhythm because they cue us to, and we always cheer on those who have managed to be lapped and come in dead last.

Alas, ticket prices for the meet have gone way up (and I've grown way too disenchanted with all the doping), so I haven't been in years. But if any fans of track and running have a chance to attend the Pre Classic just once I'd highly recommend it. (I'd dread to think how much the tickets for the world championships will cost.)

PS - Here's one of the posters from one of the meets I went to, for obvious reasons it's no longer hanging on my wall. But I'm still keeping it as a lark.

 
A'ight, any of you fellow Yanks getting ready for a Thanksgiving Day run or walk this year?

Dad and me are getting ready for the annual Turkey Stuffer 5k in Springfield, OR, right now, we used to run it all the time about a decade ago. But being dad had a heart attack earlier this summer and I'm in less-than-ideal shape we've just decided we're going to walk it this year.

We already have a strategy - we're going to walk behind the baby stroller people, and if the weather gets too shitty (which it always is anyway), or he needs to take his nitro we'll just turn back and go back home.

Either way we'll get our t-shirts, and it should be fun to see all the other people who show up in costumes and such. (And dad and I always like to make fun of the runners who take this fun race much too seriously. :))
 
Rats! Dad and I won't be doing the Turkey Stuffer 5k after all today, dad has caught a cold and is out of commission. Figures, the weather is decent and this would have been our first Turkey Stuffer in ages, dad's timing could have been better. At least we got our t-shirts, but even those... the design on them is cool, but I don't like that material. It's that high-techy fabric stuff, it's always felt slimy to me. (Couldn't they have stuck to 100% cotton? The price wasn't any different.)

I'm not going to go by myself because walking alone would just be too damn boring, maybe I'll just hang some x-mas lights on the house instead. I need some kind of spills and thrills today.

Anyhoo, Happy Thanksgiving fellow Yanks, don't eat too much! (Or do, you're probably in much better shape than I am.)
 
Re:

Valv.Piti said:
Been taking up running lately, since I am running a half marathon in a month or so. Just chilling around a bit around 5 min/km at the moment on semi long runs, thats pretty good right now I think.
Good for you, Valv.Piti, 5min/km is always respectable! (More than respectable, actually.)

What's the weather like in your area?
 
Re: Re:

Tricycle Rider said:
Valv.Piti said:
Been taking up running lately, since I am running a half marathon in a month or so. Just chilling around a bit around 5 min/km at the moment on semi long runs, thats pretty good right now I think.
Good for you, Valv.Piti, 5min/km is always respectable! (More than respectable, actually.)

What's the weather like in your area?
Around 0 celsius, I've ran in snow the last two days. Its pretty lovely IMO. I don't really care for the cold when running anyways, as long as it doesnt rain heavily Im down for anything.
 
Excuse if this is old news but the Beeb has a film up on Roger Bannister's breaking of the 4-minute mile (first shown last summer). Which I found entertaining if for no other reason that it includes interviews with many of the principals involved, including Bannister himself (now aged 88).

The thing that struck me most remarkable, living in this age when athletes tend to be such specialists, is that Bannister, then a junior doctor, worked a shift that morning in hospital, went out that afternoon, put on his spikes and ran 3:59.4.

There were "authorities" at the time who prior to that event declared unequivocally that it was beyond the limits of human endurance to break the 4-minute mark. Yet just 46 days later, Aussie John Landy ran 3:57.9. Which set the stage for the mile of the Century, a confrontation between the two later that year at the Commonwealth Games in Vancouver BC. The BBC film includes an interview with Phil Knight, co-founder of Nike trainers, telling that he was there in 1954 for the Bannister-Landy duel, and that event cemented his love for track and field sport.
 
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