The Women's Road Racing Thread 2019

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I noticed that an interesting talent dominated the (2.2) Kreiz Breizh stage race in Brittany. Teniel Campbell, a 21 year old from Trinidad and Tobago, won both stages and the GC. She is riding for the UCI development squad. She now has five UCI ranked wins this season. It’s not clear to me what type of rider she is. Today she won a bunch sprint. A little while ago, she won the U23 TT at the Pan American games. I suppose at that age, the talented can seem good at everything.
 
The female San Sebastien was a strange race - Break got three minutes, followed by a larger second group featuring Lucy Kennedy and then the big hitters were even further behind - Come to the second last climb and the break of 3 had a lead of just over a minute from this larger group with the favourites behind - Kennedy flew up the climb and crested 20 seconds ahead of Ensing and a further 30 seconds to a group of three and then another 40 seconds to a smaller group which didn't feature the favourites - Somehow Kennedy had a double mechanical on the descent and fell back to in between the third group and the fourth group - These two groups then merged and luckily Williams of MS survived the previous climb and drove the group in the valley to reduce Ensing's lead from 90 seconds to thirty seconds before the last short,punchy climb - Kennedy reeled in Ensing to then descend 8kms to the finish - The top ten was a surprise, though Kennedy was super strong.
 
She didn't start riding until she was in her 30s, and she has basically been an itinerant mercenary for a long while, so not doing a huge amount of race days. There's also a strong chance, but no certainty by any means, that it doesn't belong in this part of the forum - she was connected to Patrice Ciprelli, who was her coach along with his wife Jeannie Longo-Ciprelli, of course, and Cogeas-Mettler, with Zabelinskaya and Neben also on the books, are not particularly fussed about 40-year-old dopers in the ranks.
 
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del1962 said:
King Boonen said:
Tour of Scotland next week. Going to head out to the Dukes Pass to watch the fight for the climbing points.
Interesting route





There's definitely enough in it to make for interesting racing. Not sure what TV coverage there's going to be though.

Libertine Seguros said:
Is that an uphill finish in Dunfermline? Any idea how difficult, or are we talking pure Vos terrain?
If it's the same as the crit finish it's about 200m at 10% and then another 150-200 flat. Finish line may have been shifted as it's a hard left at the end of the ramp into the finishing straight on the crit. Great place to get taken out by pundies.
 
The Ride London Classique is a rubbish race - What a waste of 100,000 in prize money - Fail to see why they couldn't use part of the men's route like many other joint races have provided for the riders.
 
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yaco said:
The Ride London Classique is a rubbish race - What a waste of 100,000 in prize money - Fail to see why they couldn't use part of the men's route like many other joint races have provided for the riders.
Because the everyman ride is using the course that day, and they considered it would be too disruptive to close that part of the course for the women too. It's why the RideLondon Classique is one of the more debated WWT races. The prize pot is big, the organization is strong, and a lot of riders like it for those reasons, but at the same time it is reinforcing one of the main issues that we have had in recent years - inequality of parcours - and pklacing the elite women below hobbyists in the priority list, fobbing them off with a 90 minute crit. Because it has a large prize pot, and previously didn't have any major opposition in the calendar (and now only has major opposition from a race which is designed for a completely different type of rider, so won't affect its startlist), it would still attract a strong field without the WWT status, and the fact that events like this were given WWT status while races like Thüringen and, originally, Emakumeen Bira weren't, was - and continues to be - a source of some consternation.
 
PeterB said:
AQETUYIOI said:
MartinGT said:
Was that a DSQ for Wild? Seems harsh!
https://youtu.be/o6kbIDIwr-0?t=140
This is exactly the situation which deserves disqualification - swerving into the space occupied by another rider. So not only blocking that rider from following her line, but directly riding into her. It is irrelevant if she saw her - even if not, it's still dsq to me.
Whats the difference between Wild's movement and that of Ackermann and Gaviriain yesterday Tour of Poland sprint? Riders had to make drastic changes to avoid going down yet Ackermann won and nothing changed.

If Hoskins stays upright is it a win for Wild?
 
A good number of the women will stay on and ride the full Sportive 100 mile course today. Kirsten Wild and Lisa Brennauer are two that I am aware of. When I did the ride I remember being overtaken by the Wiggle Honda squad on the entry to Richmond Park
 
Sep 27, 2015
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MartinGT said:
Whats the difference between Wild's movement and that of Ackermann and Gaviriain yesterday Tour of Poland sprint? Riders had to make drastic changes to avoid going down yet Ackermann won and nothing changed.

If Hoskins stays upright is it a win for Wild?
Causing crashes is okay?
 
AQETUYIOI said:
MartinGT said:
Whats the difference between Wild's movement and that of Ackermann and Gaviriain yesterday Tour of Poland sprint? Riders had to make drastic changes to avoid going down yet Ackermann won and nothing changed.

If Hoskins stays upright is it a win for Wild?
Causing crashes is okay?
Did I say that?
 
The crash was obviously an aggravating factor and Wild's riding was reckless, that's why she was held accountable.
But you are right that in Poland it was almost the same - had the Bahrain rider crashed, I guess Gaviria or Ackerman would be demoted.
 
AQETUYIOI said:
Difference is causing crashes, you seem to think otherwise.
I asked a question what the difference was.

Ackermann and Gaviria moved a hell of a lot more than Wild did. A couple of riders had to basically stop their sprints and take preventative action to stop coming down.

So my question is. If Hoskins hadn't have been crossing wheels and been able to move out, Wild still wins. Does the result still stand because nobody hit the deck?
 
European Championships comming up soon on a flat parcours suited for Masssprint. Im no women cycling expert so Im a bit curious, who will the Netherlands decide to ride for in a masssprint. Wild or Wiebes ? Its a bit interesting that this decision will likely decide who the next champion will be... Or will that decision be so hard that they choose to ride agressive instead...
 
MADRAZO said:
European Championships comming up soon on a flat parcours suited for Masssprint. Im no women cycling expert so Im a bit curious, who will the Netherlands decide to ride for in a masssprint. Wild or Wiebes ? Its a bit interesting that this decision will likely decide who the next champion will be... Or will that decision be so hard that they choose to ride agressive instead...
Holland will have one clearly DEFINED leader - They don't want a repeat of last year when they chased down the break which contained a Dutch rider and carried Bastianelli to the finish line.
 
European Championship ITTs going on today, with the predictable head of the field being made up of the host nation's talents, seeing as the host nation is of course the Netherlands. Before they could get ready to celebrate, however, the German Hannah Ludwig made mincemeat of her U23 opposition, winning by a clear 38 seconds over a 22km time trial, ahead of the Russian Maria Novolodskaya and Italy's Elena Pirrone. Interestingly, all are well within the age restriction - Pirrone is 20, Novolodskaya turned 20 just two weeks ago, and Ludwig is still 19. The silver and bronze battle was very tight, with Pirrone just 2" behind the Russian, and both Aurora Nerlo of Poland and Emma Norsgaard of Denmark missing out by 2" themselves.

Ludwig's time would have placed her 7th in the elite TT over the same course, but well over a minute down on the winner, local favourite Ellen van Dijk. Van Dijk completed the course in just over 28 minutes, for an advantage of 30" over silver medallist Lisa Klein, who only turned 23 last month, and compatriot Lucinda Brand, who narrowly pipped adoptive Norwegian (Latvian-born) Vita Heine for bronze with just 2" advantage again. Anna Kiesenhofer, seemingly much happier now divorced from the rigmarole of a pro career, rounded out the top 5 for Austria and taking some noteworthy scalps, including Mieke Kröger, Hayley Simmonds and Pernille Mathiesen, along with Hour Record holder Vittoria Bussi, who missed out on the top 10, preferring a longer test than this clearly. Some who will be very disappointed with their day's work include Ann-Sophie Duyck, usually a very strong time triallist but down in 17th today, and Cecilie Uttrup Ludwig, 23rd of 31 entrants which is very unlike her.

Yesterday, the Junior race was another home win, with 17-year-old Shirin van Anrooij taking the win for the Netherlands ahead of Aigul Gareeva of Russia by just 3 seconds; the two had a significant advantage over the bronze medal, which eventually went to Sweden's Wilma Olausson. At the same time, on the other side of the Atlantic, the Pan-American Games ITT was taking place in Lima, with Chloe Dygert stomping the field pretty comprehensively, with few other North Americans making the journey, and only the WCC's Teniel Campbell - fresh from her wins in Brétagne last week - able to stay within two and a half minutes of the American phenom.
 
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