The Women's Road Racing Thread 2021

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Re: Re:

RedheadDane said:
Libertine Seguros said:
Cadets is U16 or U17 depending on how you classify it. As neither Niewiadoma nor Ludwig got to defend their U23 WWT jerseys despite being 22 for the vast majority of the season they defended it, you'd define it as U17, as you become ineligible in the year you turn 17.
Isn't that how it's always counted. You're too old for - say, U17 - the year you turn 17, no matter if your birthday is January 1, or December 31.
Depends on the sport. U21 football, for example, has at times historically had people remain eligible until the end of the season in which they've turned 21.
 
Re: Re:

Libertine Seguros said:
RedheadDane said:
Libertine Seguros said:
Cadets is U16 or U17 depending on how you classify it. As neither Niewiadoma nor Ludwig got to defend their U23 WWT jerseys despite being 22 for the vast majority of the season they defended it, you'd define it as U17, as you become ineligible in the year you turn 17.
Isn't that how it's always counted. You're too old for - say, U17 - the year you turn 17, no matter if your birthday is January 1, or December 31.
Depends on the sport. U21 football, for example, has at times historically had people remain eligible until the end of the season in which they've turned 21.
I'm generally thinking in cycling terms here. Just the principle of the thing.
 
Good news from van Vleuten's doctor. She didn't break a kneecap at all, she just microfractured the proximal tibia which is the part that connects tibia to kneecap.

There's very few nerves there which explains why she kept riding and said after the race that she didn't feel any pain at all. The danger of this injury is that, precisely because you feel no pain, you might not realize anything is wrong. In her case it's identified and will heal properly.

No long term worries.
 
Even if she had broken her kneecap I wouldn't be too worried about long-term damage.
A broken back didn't stop her for long!
Or... maybe you were on to something in the World Championship thread, LS. Maybe they replaced her entire skeleton with titanium after her Rio injury. Maybe she's actually a cyborg now! :p
 
Aug 18, 2017
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Re:

GuyIncognito said:
Good news from van Vleuten's doctor. She didn't break a kneecap at all, she just microfractured the proximal tibia which is the part that connects tibia to kneecap.

There's very few nerves there which explains why she kept riding and said after the race that she didn't feel any pain at all. The danger of this injury is that, precisely because you feel no pain, you might not realize anything is wrong. In her case it's identified and will heal properly.

No long term worries.
read her website - it's not good news
http://www.annemiekvanvleuten.nl/nieuws/rollercoaster-week-in-innsbruck/
 
While it's a somber tone - it did happen to her after all and losing the chance at a worlds course like this one is massive for her - the gist of it seems to be what the doc said: a few weeks of no training with no long term physical damage.
 
Sep 30, 2014
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Jolien D'hoore confirmed for Boels next year. Watch out world... with a top rank sprinter they will fancy winning every race they start.

And OnePro for women is dead already.
 
A bit of late season racing going on in Italy to keep up to speed on; a lot of the big guns have brought their seasons to a halt after Innsbruck, but still a few decent names out there racing.

Firstly, Elena Cecchini took her first national TT jersey, effectively stepping up one from last year's result in the absence of defending champion Elisa Longo Borghini, who is resting post-Worlds. The Canyon rider and multiple former road race champion managed to triumph by a mere 11 seconds over new World Hour Record holder Vittoria Bussi, who became the first woman to top the 48km mark a few weeks ago. The podium was rounded out by Rossella Ratto, but six riders made it within 35", ranging from 19yo neopro Elena Pirrone to established veteran Tatiana Guderzo, who wasn't resting post-Worlds, despite having obviously had a very tough day in Innsbruck to come home with a medal.

In the Giro dell'Emilia, Rasa Leleivyte broke from her tradition of low top 10 types of placements on punchy finales to take the victory; the Lithuanian champion came to the sport as a versatile sprinter, but since returning from her suspension in 2014 has been more suited to punchy terrain, with a number of high profile top 10s, including the GP Plouay, a Giro stage in San Fior, the European Championships in Plumelec, and the Ronde van Vlaanderen. She has been edging forward in the Giro dell'Emilia year by year, 4th in 2015, 2nd in 2017 and now winning in 2018, ahead of two of the sensations of 2017 who have had difficult second years at the top. Arlenis Sierra started the season well but has rather tailed off in the middle of the year, while Cecilie Uttrup Ludwig had health problems in the early season which were thankfully resolved in time for her playgrounds in the mountains in July where she returned to strong performance levels both on the bike and in interviews. The evergreen Guderzo has had a fairly low-key season ending strongly, and finished 4th, the last of their group before a time gap back to Ane Santesteban and a group dominated by the BTC team, with Ursa Pintar, Hanna Nilson and Polona Batagelj all present and correct.

Finally, the GP Bruno Beghelli Donne Elite was an incredibly short, rolling route that took barely 2 hours to complete, and ended with a reduced sprint, which was won impressively by bespectacled 20-year-old sprinter Elisa Balsamo ahead of her highly decorated compatriot Marta Bastianelli and the teenage sensation for Parkhotel, Lorena Wiebes. Finishing 11th in Emilia, Balsamo is clearly more than 'just' a sprinter, but she's very quietly had a very strong season in .1 and .2 races and could well be one for the future.

Although there's a Women's World Tour event in the Tour of GuangXi as a one-day race, it's also true that the season is basically wrapped up for most of the riders now, seeing as for the most part the péloton is based out of Europe. There is the Chrono des Nations next Sunday, but that's all for European road racing this season; the rest of the remaining road calendar for the year is distant races in South America and Asia, and the elites are either resting up now, or setting up their seasons for track or 'cross...
 
Swedish newspaper Dagens Nyheter doing articles on cyclists and eating disorders -

Two important articles on the pressure on cyclists to lose weight and resulting eating disorders & anxiety/angst - Sara Penton's story - her palmares at https://www.procyclingstats.com/rider/sara-penton

https://www.dn.se/sport/jag-kunde-inte-tanka-pa-nagot-annat-an-maten/

Sara Penton's blogg on weight and the rush to super skinny and higher W/kg
https://sarapenton.com/2018/10/04/tva-storlekar-mindre-men-radd-for-en-banan-ett-ganska-viktigt-inlagg/
She went down 7 kg in 6 weeks (!) then the team dietest said she should lose 3 kg more - then common sense said stop.

Olympic MTB champ Jenny Rissveds writes also on the same topic
https://www.dn.se/sport/rissveds-berattar-om-tidigare-atstorningar/

Jenny Rissveds Instagram - in English!
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bowjffmncsx/

If people need help with reading articles/translation, PM me.
 
It is a long standing issue that periodically raises its head. It was a large part of Marta Bastianelli's problems, the pressure to diet down and make herself into more of a climber, as a teenage world champion and with Luperini outgoing, the Italians wanted a new Giro contender to get behind and her team and agents pushed Marta to be that person. Mara Abbott is the most famous instance of eating disorders in women's cycling, but it's also worth noting that after many months of radio silence from her side Kseniya Tuhai re-surfaced on instagram last month with a new status line, "ex-pro cyclist, cured of anorexia". I do confess that after her excellent 2016 with her Giro top 10 and strong showings in the mountains in the Ardêche, then not riding until the Emakumeen Bira the following year, being way off the pace and DNFing early on and having a bad case of the 2010 Cobos, I did fear that all was not as it seemed for Kseniya and, given that she was pretty scarily thin even at her peak, I can't say that her admitting to having had problems with anorexia is a revelation that is totally surprising, even if it is somewhat saddening to see her go from the sport so young (she's still just 23), as after her strong 2016 climbing performances I thought she was a strong prospect with a skillset that is often not rewarded enough in women's cycling. However, health must take precedence, and I'd rather see her out of cycling and healthy than still cycling at the expense of her health.
 
Aug 18, 2017
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Re: The Women's Road Racing Thread 2018

Chrono des Nations: Olga Zabelinskaya (Cogeas-Mettler) won the Chrono des Nations this Sunday in Les Herbiers. The Olympic vice champion in Rio in 2016 won by 12 seconds ahead of Emma Jorgensen (Cervélo Bigla). The title holder, Audrey Cordon-Ragot finished in third place. The Bretonne was taking part in her last race for the Wiggle High5 team, she will join Trek-Segafredo in 2019
 
I don't think they separate the U23 and Elite women due to truncated startlist at this point in the season.

I'm assuming since the results sheet has rechristened her Emma Jørgensen, that the men's espoir winner Mathias Norsgaard Jørgensen is a relative.
 
They're siblings.
And I was just wondering if it was a situation like the 2016 European championship, and they simply declared the best placed U23 rider the winner of a race-within-a-race.
Mainly the fact that they specifically call it elite/espoirs, rather than just elite.
 

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