• The Cycling News forum is looking to add some volunteer moderators with Red Rick's recent retirement. If you're interested in helping keep our discussions on track, send a direct message to @SHaines here on the forum, or use the Contact Us form to message the Community Team.

    In the meanwhile, please use the Report option if you see a post that doesn't fit within the forum rules.

    Thanks!

Tubeless for CX

Mar 4, 2009
160
0
0
Visit site
Depends on what you're looking for.

Tubeless lets you run a lower air pressure than a typical tube-type setup but not as low as a proper tubular (still need enough air to keep the tire from burping or rolling). I've generally only been able to run down to about 40psi whereas I regularly run 30psi or lower with tubies.

Tread selection is also pretty limited so far but the Hutchinson ones that are out there currently are at least pretty good. The Bulldog in particular is far meatier than what's usually offered for 'cross, which is great for rockier and/or looser conditions.
 
Jun 16, 2009
346
0
0
Visit site
zalacain said:
Not tubeless but the same as Tubulars except they fit on clincher rims. Wide variety of CX treads too.

Where do you get the information on the CX tubular-clinchers? I've looked at Tufo's site but only get tubular CX tyres ...

And I'm assuming you've ridden with them - how do they ride? Are there any issues with being more puncture prone or prone to slipping off the rim? And does the way that they mount (ie., with the "air space" between the tyre and the rim channel) make them slower rolling?

Thanks for whatever info you can give - I'm keen for an option to move away from clinchers for the coming cross season ... but since I use my race bike as a winter commuter, I'm not keen to go all out and go for a new set of tubular wheels ...
 
Jun 17, 2009
4
0
0
Visit site
I'm not 100% sure but I think Tufo has discontinued the tubular clinchers though you can still find some around. And as far as tubeless, while I haven't used them, I heard a lot of them in action last year going through the turns ...
"Burp!"
Excuse me! And I had a number of friends using tubeless that gave me invaluable insight to their performance ...
"Burp!"
Excuse me, again! Must be that Stan's Burrito I had for lunch. The friends that were tubeless have now gone tubular. While tubeless seems like the thing for mtbs the low pressure demanded by cyclocross, is, well, probably too low.
 
Jun 17, 2009
4
0
0
Visit site
GETTING away from clinchers? I train on clinchers (most of the time) and do all my winter riding on them. They are the cheapest and most convenient set-up for that kind of riding. For snow and ice there's nothing like a Mud2 in the back in a Jet in the front, or in deep mud Mud2s front and rear. For racing though nothing can match a tubular. Even a cheap tubular on a cheap wheel is better than clinchers on trick wheels.

The tubular clinchers from Tufo are just like tubulars in that if you damage them you're in trouble (though you can repair Tufo's better than traditional tubulars) still they are a pain in the *** to get on and off, and fixing one on a winter ride ... yuck! I have heard that the tubular/clinchers did roll-off ... though I'm not positive about this.

If you can go for a set of tubulars, and a cheap set of wheels for training and riding clinchers. It will give you more options at races, plus back up if you flat.
 
Jun 16, 2009
346
0
0
Visit site
Surly B said:
If you can go for a set of tubulars, and a cheap set of wheels for training and riding clinchers. It will give you more options at races, plus back up if you flat.
Thanks for your comments (and sorry to the OP for slightly hijacking your thread ...)

I definitely hear you about the ease of clinchers. I actually managed to do OK with them racing - don't ask me how I got away with it, but I ran low to mid 30's psi all season and had heaps of grip, no rolled tyres (before you ask abotu the pressure) and no punctures!

I guess I'm kinda shy on tubulars because of my experiences with them on the road - lots of punctures back in the '90's and more recently not noticing much of a difference between them and clinchers (comparing Pro2's and Conti Competitions). I realise that a cross tub will be different, but am just still trying to convince myself to go that way ... :)
 
Jul 30, 2009
3
0
0
Visit site
James Huang said:
Depends on what you're looking for.

Tubeless lets you run a lower air pressure than a typical tube-type setup but not as low as a proper tubular (still need enough air to keep the tire from burping or rolling). I've generally only been able to run down to about 40psi whereas I regularly run 30psi or lower with tubies.

Tread selection is also pretty limited so far but the Hutchinson ones that are out there currently are at least pretty good. The Bulldog in particular is far meatier than what's usually offered for 'cross, which is great for rockier and/or looser conditions.
It also appears that not all manufactures are offering tubulars on their top models.
What's UP with that?
Does that means their sponsored athletes aren't running tubulars?
 

cyclocross

BANNED
Mar 18, 2009
5
0
0
Visit site
Tubeless options beyond hutchinson

Bstrong said:
Looking for any input and experiences with tubeless for CX. I've used them for MTB only. Thanks, B

hey - Cyclocross Magazine has a bunch of great content on tubeless for cyclocross - both tubeless-ready and converting normal tires/wheels to tubeless.

Here's a few of the articles

If you find it kinda dead here (it's not 'cross season yet?) there are also forums and an online community over there dedicated to the sport...complimenting the all-cycling fun right here.