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Jun 22, 2009
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theyoungest said:
Wow. You got this from the Klan forum?


How can anyone argue that Obama is a radical? He's as middle-of-the-road as they come.
From an open Facebook page, would you believe!?:rolleyes:

These people have no concept of a 'political spectrum'. If they don't see themselves as extreme, loony right, you know, how everyone in the world who's not actually one of them sees them, how can they have any concept of, or make any distinctions between, anyone further to the left. We are all, in their view, liberals, radicals, socialists, communists, and worse.

I saw one guy referring to the current SCOTUS as being already "too liberal". I mean, how can you communicate meaningfully with someone like that?

To clarify - when I refer to "these people", etc., I am specifically referring to the serious loonies, the ones right over the edge, like the people who wrote the excerpts I posted earlier, and not to more traditional Republicans and those on the right of the spectrum who have not demonstrably lost their minds, as the people I quoted evidently have.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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Bala Verde said:
lol. I always assumed that when he left/stopped posting (although I bet he is lurking, but now wearing a straight jacket to prevent him from logging in that one last time) he had put his job on hold to phonebank (for freedom) in Ohio or something. ;)
Scott SoCal said:
So what did I miss?:D
That was fast...

Are you alright? How are you feeling? Is there something we can do for you? I think I am speaking for everyone when I say we are/were concerned....:)
 
Sep 10, 2009
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538 was the most accurate of the aggregators.

Electoral-Vote.com - average miss 2.32 points; average bias R+1.16
Electoral-Projection-com - average miss 2.09 points; average bias R+1.64

FiveThirtyEight - average miss 1.61 points; average bias R+0.50

Frontloading HQ - average miss 1.95 points; average bias R+0.94

Gott/Colley Electoral Scoreboard - average miss 2.57 points; average bias R+1.89

HuffingtonPost Pollster - average miss 1.98 points; average bias +1.16

Princeton Election Consortium - average miss 1.99 points; average bias R+1.94

RealClearPolitics - average miss 2.52 points; average bias R+1.78

TalkingPointsMemo PollTracker - average miss 2.04 points; average bias R+1.22
While this is satire, there is a kernel of truth to it:

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/borowitzreport/2012/11/republicans-consider-welcoming-people-who-believe-in-math-and-science.html
 
Nov 8, 2012
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Bala Verde said:
That was fast...

Are you alright? How are you feeling? Is there something we can do for you? I think I am speaking for everyone when I say we are/were concerned....:)
No. I'm great. But thanks for the concern. I'm sure it comes from the heart:)


So how about those R's gettin steamrolled?? Yikes. Pretty big shift in the electorate that has been completely missed by the know-it-all's on the right.

I have a couple of observations... wanna hear 'em?

Harry Reid was pretty funny yesterday. He's willing to work with Repubs but he's not going to get pushed around. Fair enough. Then he starts the process to change the filibuster rules in the Senate (on top of the amendment rules he's already changed). WTF?:D I guess he does not think the Dems will ever again be in the minority in the Senate. Typically talking out of both sides of his mouth and it is code for "I am going to f'ing drop the hammer of those f'ing Repubs..." Pretty funny stuff.

Watch California very closely over the next couple of years. I think whatever happens here in the very near future will be exactly what happens across the US in 2014 and 2016 and even further on. We voted in Prop 30 which raised sales tax and income tax on higher wage earners. BUT, the Cali legislature now has a Dem super-majority... first time in 80 years which means they control everything and cannot be opposed. So, if California solves their fiscal challenges and manages to spur huge economic growth with massive tax increases and unbridled liberalism then that is what the USA will look like within the next decade or so.

If it's a dismal failure then I think the the rest of the country will still go that way but probably over two or three decades.
 
Sep 10, 2009
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Scott SoCal said:
No. I'm great. But thanks for the concern. I'm sure it comes from the heart:)


So how about those R's gettin steamrolled?? Yikes. Pretty big shift in the electorate that has been completely missed by the know-it-all's on the right.

I have a couple of observations... wanna hear 'em?

Harry Reid was pretty funny yesterday. He's willing to work with Repubs but he's not going to get pushed around. Fair enough. Then he starts the process to change the filibuster rules in the Senate (on top of the amendment rules he's already changed). WTF?:D I guess he does not think the Dems will ever again be in the minority in the Senate. Typically talking out of both sides of his mouth and it is code for "I am going to f'ing drop the hammer of those f'ing Repubs..." Pretty funny stuff.

Watch California very closely over the next couple of years. I think whatever happens here in the very near future will be exactly what happens across the US in 2014 and 2016 and even further on. We voted in Prop 30 which raised sales tax and income tax on higher wage earners. BUT, the Cali legislature now has a Dem super-majority... first time in 80 years which means they control everything and cannot be opposed. So, if California solves their fiscal challenges and manages to spur huge economic growth with massive tax increases and unbridled liberalism then that is what the USA will look like within the next decade or so.

If it's a dismal failure then I think the the rest of the country will still go that way but probably over two or three decades.
Better get used to it.

http://www.pri.org/stories/politics-society/reliably-red-texas-may-become-a-blue-state-within-two-decades-10078.html

“I used to be Republican, but ever since they started the Latino bashing, I actually switched sides," he explained.

Latino bashing? He, and others, complained about the Republican Party’s harsh rhetoric on immigration control. And they rattled off complaints about the Republican-controlled Texas legislature.

“The state legislature here effectively de-funded education here. The people that are most affected by that are the Latino and African-American communities,” said Rey Guerra, a mechanical engineer and political activist.
Texas is on the road to becoming a blue state within 20 years - both Obama and Jeb Bush actually predicted that Texas will be in play in 2016, though personally I think that's a bit optimistic - and without Texas I don't see how any traditional (ie Mitt Romney type) R presidential candidate has any chance. And it's entirely the Rs own fault, by alienating their own people and treating them as if they are second-class.
 
Jun 22, 2009
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Scott SoCal said:
No. I'm great. But thanks for the concern. I'm sure it comes from the heart:)


So how about those R's gettin steamrolled?? Yikes. Pretty big shift in the electorate that has been completely missed by the know-it-all's on the right.

I have a couple of observations... wanna hear 'em?

Harry Reid was pretty funny yesterday. He's willing to work with Repubs but he's not going to get pushed around. Fair enough. Then he starts the process to change the filibuster rules in the Senate (on top of the amendment rules he's already changed). WTF?:D I guess he does not think the Dems will ever again be in the minority in the Senate. Typically talking out of both sides of his mouth and it is code for "I am going to f'ing drop the hammer of those f'ing Repubs..." Pretty funny stuff.

Watch California very closely over the next couple of years. I think whatever happens here in the very near future will be exactly what happens across the US in 2014 and 2016 and even further on. We voted in Prop 30 which raised sales tax and income tax on higher wage earners. BUT, the Cali legislature now has a Dem super-majority... first time in 80 years which means they control everything and cannot be opposed. So, if California solves their fiscal challenges and manages to spur huge economic growth with massive tax increases and unbridled liberalism then that is what the USA will look like within the next decade or so.

If it's a dismal failure then I think the the rest of the country will still go that way but probably over two or three decades.
This is a fine example of just how totally different the US mindset defines things. What you (the whole US system) call a "super majority" i.e. the party that has won the election actually being able to pass the legislation it wants to pass, which is something you see as worrying, Scott - this is how 'democracy' works in the entire rest of the civilized, western world!

The party/ parties that win, have a majority in the legislature that allows them (obviously after much discussion, debate and often compromise) to pass legislation at will. It is incomprehensible to most foreign observers how the US system of checks and balances, which was originally certainly a splendid idea, has somehow morphed into a monstrosity that consistently allows the legislature to thwart the (best) intentions of those elected to govern. It also, for example, enables those elected to govern to on occasion make partisan political SCOTUS appointments that can shape certain aspects of public life for decades into the future. I am not aware of any other western democracy that feels it is right and proper for the country's highest judges to be overt political appointees.

I'm just saying, you shouldn't automatically be suspicious and worried about the winner of the election having an actual 'working majority'.;)
 
Nov 8, 2012
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VeloCity said:
Better get used to it.

http://www.pri.org/stories/politics-society/reliably-red-texas-may-become-a-blue-state-within-two-decades-10078.html

Texas is on the road to becoming a blue state within 20 years - both Obama and Jeb Bush actually predicted that Texas will be in play in 2016, though personally I think that's a bit optimistic - and without Texas I don't see how any traditional (ie Mitt Romney type) R presidential candidate has any chance. And it's entirely the Rs own fault, by alienating their own people and treating them as if they are second-class.
You are right about the direction of Texas. I'd argue that this is now true in all but the south.

by alienating their own people and treating them as if they are second-class.
I don't think this is even a very big part of the reason. Heather Mac Donald I think has hit the nail on the head with what's truly going on here;

http://www.city-journal.org/2012/22_1_california-demographics.html
 
Mar 18, 2009
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The best thing for the Repubs to do is a grand bargain on immigration that puts the issue behind them. In exchange for amnesty, which is inevitable, they should require a way for employers to verify citizenship status AND impose very heavy civil, maybe even criminal, sanctions for those who hire illegals. At the same time they might give tax benefits for investing in Mexico and Latin America that incentivize people to invest there instead of China.

I don't think they will do this because despite all the nashing of teeth about the country being "invaded" by illegals from the Republican soldiers in the trenches, the Republican generals are backed by business interests that want an influx of low paid workers.

On the legislative front there are probably a lot of things that Republicans want that they could get if they are willing to deal big. Tort reform for one. Simplified tax code for another.
 
Nov 8, 2012
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Amsterhammer said:
This is a fine example of just how totally different the US mindset defines things. What you (the whole US system) call a "super majority" i.e. the party that has won the election actually being able to pass the legislation it wants to pass, which is something you see as worrying, Scott - this is how 'democracy' works in the entire rest of the civilized, western world!

The party/ parties that win, have a majority in the legislature that allows them (obviously after much discussion, debate and often compromise) to pass legislation at will. It is incomprehensible to most foreign observers how the US system of checks and balances, which was originally certainly a splendid idea, has somehow morphed into a monstrosity that consistently allows the legislature to thwart the (best) intentions of those elected to govern. It also, for example, enables those elected to govern to on occasion make partisan political SCOTUS appointments that can shape certain aspects of public life for decades into the future. I am not aware of any other western democracy that feels it is right and proper for the country's highest judges to be overt political appointees.

I'm just saying, you shouldn't automatically be suspicious and worried about the winner of the election having an actual 'working majority'.;)
This is a fine example of just how totally different the US mindset defines things. What you (the whole US system) call a "super majority" i.e. the party that has won the election actually being able to pass the legislation it wants to pass, which is something you see as worrying, Scott - this is how 'democracy' works in the entire rest of the civilized, western world!
I understand. There are rules put in place here to prevent the majority party from steamrolling the minority party. In Cali, they legislature needs 2/3 majority to increase taxes. I think that was voted on by proposition some years ago.

The party/ parties that win, have a majority in the legislature that allows them (obviously after much discussion, debate and often compromise) to pass legislation at will. It is incomprehensible to most foreign observers how the US system of checks and balances, which was originally certainly a splendid idea, has somehow morphed into a monstrosity that consistently allows the legislature to thwart the (best) intentions of those elected to govern.
Well, much of the rest of the world isn't dealing with a two party system. Believe me, under our system the ability to filibuster is necessary and both sides have a long history of using it.

I'm just saying, you shouldn't automatically be suspicious and worried about the winner of the election having an actual 'working majority'
This was on the front page of today's LA Times;

"The pressure on Democrats to restore funding for the many services slashed to balance the budget in recent years will be intense.

Already, activists are pressing lawmakers to pump new money into such programs as college scholarships, dental care for the needy and, of course, public schools."

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-sacramento-democrats-20121108,0,6253598.story

It's already started.
 
Dec 7, 2010
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Scott SoCal said:
You are right about the direction of Texas. I'd argue that this is now true in all but the south.



I don't think this is even a very big part of the reason. Heather Mac Donald I think has hit the nail on the head with what's truly going on here;

http://www.city-journal.org/2012/22_1_california-demographics.html
whoa....Does ChrisE know about this?

I will stay away from the state of Texas for a while. There is bound to be some good ole fashioned shoot outs soon.

Hey did you guys see this? First to jump ship?

http://washington.cbslocal.com/2012/11/08/report-holder-announces-he-might-not-stay-on-as-attorney-general/
 
Dec 7, 2010
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Scott SoCal said:
I understand. There are rules put in place here to prevent the majority party from steamrolling the minority party. In Cali, they legislature needs 2/3 majority to increase taxes. I think that was voted on by proposition some years ago.



Well, much of the rest of the world isn't dealing with a two party system. Believe me, under our system the ability to filibuster is necessary and both sides have a long history of using it.



This was on the front page of today's LA Times;

"The pressure on Democrats to restore funding for the many services slashed to balance the budget in recent years will be intense.

Already, activists are pressing lawmakers to pump new money into such programs as college scholarships, dental care for the needy and, of course, public schools."

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-sacramento-democrats-20121108,0,6253598.story

It's already started.
Time to give out money you don't even have yet. Great Idea. I will recomend that you guys raise taxes for every month for a year and save some money. Then give it away.
 
Nov 8, 2012
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BroDeal said:
The best thing for the Repubs to do is a grand bargain on immigration that puts the issue behind them. In exchange for amnesty, which is inevitable, they should require a way for employers to verify citizenship status AND impose very heavy civil, maybe even criminal, sanctions for those who hire illegals. At the same time they might give tax benefits for investing in Mexico and Latin America that incentivize people to invest there instead of China.

I don't think they will do this because despite all the nashing of teeth about the country being "invaded" by illegals from the Republican trenches, the Republican generals are backed by business interests that want an influx of low paid workers.

On the legislative front there are probably a lot of things that Republicans want that they could get if they are willing to deal big. Tort reform for one. Simplified tax code for another.

I agree. I don't think there's going to be much opposition from the R's.

I think if Obama can pull off reducing spending and somehow get a nice rise in GDP there will be a D controlled government for 30 or more years. The pro-growth limited govt types like me are just becoming noise in the background.
 
Democrat-Boycotting Libertarian Eric Dondero on Whether He Would Let a Democrat Drown

All family and friends, even close family and friends, who I know to be Democrats are hereby dead to me. I vow never to speak to them again for the rest of my life, or have any communications with them. They are in short, the enemies of liberty. They deserve nothing less than hatred and utter contempt.
I strongly urge all other libertarians to do the same. Are you married to someone who voted for Obama, have a girlfriend who voted 'O'. Divorce them. Break up with them without haste. Vow not to attend family functions, Thanksgiving dinner or Christmas for example, if there will be any family members in attendance who are Democrats.
Do you work for someone who voted for Obama? Quit your job. Co-workers who voted for Obama. Simply don't talk to them in the workplace, unless your boss instructs you too for work-related only purposes. Have clients who voted Democrat? Call them up this morning and tell them to take their business elsewhere.
Have a neighbor who votes for Obama? You could take a crap on their lawn. Then again, probably not a good idea since it would be technically illegal to do this. But you could have your dog take care of business. Not your fault if he just happens to choose that particular spot.
 
Mar 18, 2009
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Scott SoCal said:
I agree. I don't think there's going to be much opposition from the R's.
There will be opposition to realistic immigration reform from not only business interests opposing the effective closure of the borders but the loony tune fringe that is convinced that any sort of federal ID is the first step to being rounded up and shipped off to FEMA run concentration camps. At the same time an amnesty will produce a voter windfall for the Democrats. If the Repubs played their cards right, they might be able to nominate Rubio in 2016 and capture a lot of those voters; but the party has a severe brand problem with minorities that might be hard to overcome.

Scott SoCal said:
I think if Obama can pull off reducing spending and somehow get a nice rise in GDP there will be a D controlled government for 30 or more years. The pro-growth limited govt types like me are just becoming noise in the background.
People should concentrate on effective government because we are never going back to an idealized past where government was small and limited. Society has grown too large for that.
 
Scott SoCal said:
No. I'm great...

We voted in Prop 30 which raised sales tax and income tax on higher wage earners.

If it's a dismal failure then I think the the rest of the country will still go that way but probably over two or three decades.
Glad to hear you are great. What has just taken place in California is exactly the opposite of what happened in 1978 when California approved Proposition 13 that, reducing property taxes, placed into motion an anti-fiscal ideology, which was then taken up by Ronald Reagan and subsequently has gone on to condition American politics over the last 30 years or so. Now the pendulum has swung to the other side, so that one has begun to understand that investing in the public sphere, especially in the schools, is a means to facilitate economic growth and diminish inequality.

Imagine though Scott if all those millions that corporate America wasted on financing Romney’s campaign, had been used to build schools and hire teachers. This is a perverse irony, which I can only find grotesque in a society that has always claimed to be about opportunity and the promoters of equality among the citizenry.
 
Dec 7, 2010
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rhubroma said:
Glad to hear you are great. What has just taken place in California is exactly the opposite of what happened in 1978 when California approved Proposition 13 that, reducing property taxes, placed into motion an anti-fiscal ideology, which was then taken up by Ronald Reagan and subsequently has gone on to condition American politics over the last 30 years or so. Now the pendulum has swung to the other side, so that one has begun to understand that investing in the public sphere, especially in the schools, is a means to facilitate economic growth and diminish inequality.

Imagine though Scott if all those millions that corporate America wasted on financing Romney’s campaign, had been used to build schools and hire teachers. This is a perverse irony, which I can only find grotesque in a society that has always claimed to be about opportunity and the promoters of equality among the citizenry.
Only Mittons hu? :confused:

:D @ you again. :D
 
Sep 10, 2009
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And then there are the true nutcase libertarians.

http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2012/11/eric-dondero-boycott-democrat-libertarian.html

Republicans around the country are responding to President Obama's reelection in a variety of ways — among them: anger, depression, finger-pointing. But nobody had the same reaction as Eric Dondero, a former Ron Paul aide who blogs at LibertarianRepublican.net. In a post yesterday, Dondero, reasoning that the only recourse to Obama's victory is "outright revolt," laid out the terms of the "personal boycott" against Democrats which he plans to maintain for the rest of his life and that he hopes his followers will as well. What does the boycott entail? Cutting all ties with Democratic family members, friends, and lovers; refusing to work for a Democratic boss; spitting on the ground when a Democrat talks to you; and possibly ****ting on your Democratic neighbor's lawn, among other things:

All family and friends, even close family and friends, who I know to be Democrats are hereby dead to me. I vow never to speak to them again for the rest of my life, or have any communications with them. They are in short, the enemies of liberty. They deserve nothing less than hatred and utter contempt.
I strongly urge all other libertarians to do the same. Are you married to someone who voted for Obama, have a girlfriend who voted 'O'. Divorce them. Break up with them without haste. Vow not to attend family functions, Thanksgiving dinner or Christmas for example, if there will be any family members in attendance who are Democrats.

Do you work for someone who voted for Obama? Quit your job. Co-workers who voted for Obama. Simply don't talk to them in the workplace, unless your boss instructs you too for work-related only purposes. Have clients who voted Democrat? Call them up this morning and tell them to take their business elsewhere.

Have a neighbor who votes for Obama? You could take a crap on their lawn. Then again, probably not a good idea since it would be technically illegal to do this. But you could have your dog take care of business. Not your fault if he just happens to choose that particular spot.
I think someone's lost it completely.

EDIT: oh sorry Zam, didn't see that you'd already posted this.
 
Nov 8, 2012
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BroDeal said:
There will be opposition to realistic immigration reform from not only business interests opposing the effective closure of the borders but the loony tune fringe that is convinced that any sort of federal ID is the first step to being rounded up and shipped off to FEMA run concentration camps. At the same time an amnesty will produce a voter windfall for the Democrats. If the Repubs played their cards right, they might be able to nominate Rubio in 2016 and capture a lot of those voters; but the party has a severe brand problem with minorities that might be hard to overcome.



People should concentrate on effective government because we are never going back to an idealized past where government was small and limited. Society has grown too large for that.
There will be opposition to realistic immigration reform from not only business interests opposing the effective closure of the borders but the loony tune fringe that is convinced that any sort of federal ID is the first step to being rounded up and shipped off to FEMA run concentration camps. At the same time an amnesty will produce a voter windfall for the Democrats. If the Repubs played their cards right, they might be able to nominate Rubio in 2016 and capture a lot of those voters; but the party has a severe brand problem with minorities that might be hard to overcome.
I don't think immigration reform will close borders anymore than they are closed now. Amnesty is surely certain to happen now. But if Heather Mac Donald is correct then, at least in Cali, Hispanics are going to vote for whoever promises to give them the most stuff. Rubio won't help the R's with Hispanics much as the south FL Cubans already are pretty conservative. Rubio's message won't resonate with Hispanics much better than Romney's did.

"The future mismatch between labor supply and demand is likely to raise wages for college-educated workers, while a glut of workers with a high school diploma or less will depress wages on the low end and contribute to an increased demand for government services, especially among the less educated Hispanic population. U.S.-born Hispanic households in California already use welfare programs (such as cash welfare, food stamps, and housing assistance) at twice the rate of U.S.-born non-Hispanic households, according to an analysis of the March 2011 Current Population Survey by the Center for Immigration Studies. Welfare use by immigrants is higher still. In 2008–09, the fraction of households using some form of welfare was 82 percent for households headed by an illegal immigrant and 61 percent for households headed by a legal immigrant.

Higher rates of Hispanic poverty drive this disparity in welfare consumption. Hispanics made up nearly 60 percent of California’s poor in 2010, despite being less than 38 percent of the population. Nearly one-quarter of all Hispanics in California are poor, compared with a little over one-tenth of non-Hispanics. Nationally, the poverty rate of Hispanic adults drops from 25.5 percent in the first generation—the immigrant generation, that is—to 17 percent in the second but rises to 19 percent in the third, according to a Center for Immigration Studies analysis. (The poverty rate for white adults is 9 percent.) That frustrating third-generation economic stall repeats the pattern in high school graduation and college completion rates as well."
http://www.city-journal.org/2012/22_1_california-demographics.html


People should concentrate on effective government because we are never going back to an idealized past where government was small and limited. Society has grown too large for that.
Probably very good advice for Republicans if they want any influence or relevance going forward.
 
Jul 4, 2009
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VeloCity said:
And then there are the true nutcase libertarians.

http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2012/11/eric-dondero-boycott-democrat-libertarian.html

I think someone's lost it completely.
...nutcase indeed...and someone from the circle of saint of the libertarian cause Ron Paul which comes as a real surprise....him being so reasonable and just...as befits a saint...:rolleyes:...

...someone on another forum commenting on this story used the following line to define libertarians...."aetheist Republicans with no moral compass or sense of civil proportion"...translation:there is no resistance in the system to mitigate short circuits....

Cheers

blutto
 
Sep 10, 2009
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So Romney conceded FL, making the final EV tally 332-206.

Also, nothing makes me happier than this:

Casino magnate Sheldon Adelson is 0-5 in campaigns where he invested millions into super PACs to help Republican candidates.

Adelson had put millions into super PACs supporting Senate candidates George Allen in Virginia and Connie Mack in Florida, and House candidate Shmuley Boteach in New Jersey. He had previously backed Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich and Texas Senate candidate David Dewhurst, both of whom lost in primary elections.

New York Times reporter Nicholas Confessore tweeted, "With Kaine called, Adelson 0-5 for individual races he spent heavily in through super PACs this cycle. A Romney loss would be 0-6."

The biggest super PAC donor of the 2012 election could wind up going 0-6 if Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney loses to President Barack Obama. http://www.caltrops.com/pointy.php?action=viewPost&pid=150165
0-6 it is.
 
Jul 4, 2009
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Scott SoCal said:
I don't think immigration reform will close borders anymore than they are closed now. Amnesty is surely certain to happen now. But if Heather Mac Donald is correct then, at least in Cali, Hispanics are going to vote for whoever promises to give them the most stuff. Rubio won't help the R's with Hispanics much as the south FL Cubans already are pretty conservative. Rubio's message won't resonate with Hispanics much better than Romney's did.



http://www.city-journal.org/2012/22_1_california-demographics.html

Probably very good advice for Republicans if they want any influence or relevance going forward.
...Society has grown too large...and more importantly, too complex....in fact its amazing that a system designed several hundred years ago still functions as well as it does in this modern age...

Cheers

blutto
 
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