USA Pro Challenge

Sep 9, 2010
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I'm surpised (given the level of paranoia generally on display here) that nobody seems to have commented on this story?
http://http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/dombrowski-withdraws-from-usa-pro-challenge

It may well be completely innocent, but even from pretty knowledge of nosebleeds, there are 2 ways in which nosebleeds present themselves;
1. Anterior (just inside your nostrils) and. 2. Posterior (at the back of your nose). Anterior are common in children and can certainly be casued by altitude, but would they really be serious enough to withdraw under medical advice? Posterior are more serious, more common in adults and unfortunately linked to more serious issues (ie not altitude), or medicine like blood thinning medication...

Of course, a man with a physique like JD, probably doesn't have any need to enhance the awesome power that his phsyique looks capable of;
http://www1.skysports.com/cycling/news/17545/8464831/Team-Sky-and-Retul-renew-deal

Any views, or am I just reading massively between the lines?
 
Mar 10, 2009
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I've no medical knowledge of nose bleeds, and can't comment about doping and nose bleeds. However, I used to get them in very dry atmospheres, and certainly had no deadly disease and was unfortunately not a child either. A bit of a pest, nosebleeds are...
 
Sep 9, 2010
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Yep, a bit of a pest, but would it be enough for a DNF?

I've never tried racing with a nosebleed - would your elevated blood pressure turn a small nosebleed into a genuine problem?

Given the racing that SKY have given Dombrowski this year, I'd have thought he'd be going full gas to show he should have a place in their top tier? If it had been a long, hard season, I would forgive him that thinking a pesky nosebleed might just be too much to bother racing on...
 
Mar 10, 2009
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I won't say I would throw myself onto the floor screaming Shakespearian death speeches, but it really meant a lot of handkerchiefs, blood in the throat, and a lot of swearing. Perhaps his nose bleeds are no more than a ladylike trickle. I don't know. It might be enough to make racing above 2000m every day not worth it.
 
Feb 8, 2013
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I am 28 and still get this occasionally, usually when I am in hot conditions,
literally will not stop for hours. Lose that much blood as a cyclist and see how you go.

pugdog said:
I won't say I would throw myself onto the floor screaming Shakespearian death speeches, but it really meant a lot of handkerchiefs, blood in the throat, and a lot of swearing. Perhaps his nose bleeds are no more than a ladylike trickle. I don't know. It might be enough to make racing above 2000m every day not worth it.
 
Aug 16, 2011
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Stephen_M said:
Given the racing that SKY have given Dombrowski this year, I'd have thought he'd be going full gas to show he should have a place in their top tier? If it had been a long, hard season, I would forgive him that thinking a pesky nosebleed might just be too much to bother racing on...
Well it wasn't just "a" Pesky nosebleed. It was 3-5 a day, plus even waking up with blood in his mouth. And it was also the doctors decision to have him withdraw, not his.

Phil and Paul also were saying that when he was young he had a problem with frequent nosebleeds. Can't speak to the accuracy of that, but if true it should be noted. Don't think there is enough to go on from this from a doping point of view.
 
May 26, 2010
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Stephen_M said:
I'm surpised (given the level of paranoia generally on display here) that nobody seems to have commented on this story?
[
To insuate massive levels paranoia in a sport riddled with doping and you go posting a story about nosebleeds at altitude? Who's paranoid?
 
red_flanders said:
Getting nosebleeds when acclimating to altitude is fairly common. Used to happen to my dad all the time. Thin, dry air causes the membranes in the nose to crack.

Nothing to see here IMO.
exactly!

what happened to your dad was the same for me, pretty much the only time i've ever had nosebleeds.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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thirteen said:
exactly!

what happened to your dad was the same for me, pretty much the only time i've ever had nosebleeds.
Also happens when you go from a moist environment to a dry one. Not as severe but does happen.
 
I,ve worked in the Alps for many years and also the Rockies....NEVER saw or heard of anyone having a nosebleed due to altitude. And never any children...whom I worked with a lot.
 
Jan 18, 2010
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simple solution

I'm more surprised at the incompetence of the team and race doc here.

I've suffered the same problem both at sea level and when I lived in Co.

Coating the inside of your nose with petroleum jelly after the first occurrence works well for me.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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maltiv said:
Doesn't blood doping make your blood thicker, resulting in a decreased chance of getting a nose bleed?
I think you're extrapolating on a concept that is not as clear to you as someone who knows more about blood (in general) and not talking about me to some extent. Blood is still Blood and if its still in your system and you're alive its not a coagulated mess but still a fluid no matter the hematocrite.
 
Apr 3, 2011
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bleeding nose stories may bring some hollywoodish blood to the coming Uniballer movie - looking at the palmares of Roach, the film can be an interesting combination of Austin Powers and Borat

----

The USA Pro Challenge in Colorado has gone a little Hollywood this week with several players from competing US Postal movies at the race to research their projects.

Jay Roach, a producer, director and writer with more than 40 films to his credit, told Cyclingnews on Thursday that he's at the race to learn more about the racing and the bike culture.

Roach includes among his credits the Austin Powers movies that featured Mike Myers; the Meet The Parents and Meet The Fockers movies that starred Ben Stiller, Robert Deniro, Dustin Hoffman and Barbara Streisand; Borat; Dinner for Schmucks; The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy; 50 First Dates; and Mystery, Alaska.
 
Sep 9, 2010
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maltiv said:
Doesn't blood doping make your blood thicker, resulting in a decreased chance of getting a nose bleed?
Indeed, blood doping does make your blood thicker, which would mean it would coagulate more quickly (ie stop bleeding). Avoiding giving non-negative doping controls when you're blood doping, involves thinning your blood (either through volume, or using anticoagulents like warfarin). If you're taking anticoagulents, then it is really difficult to stop bleeding and something, like a pesky altitude nosebleed for example, could bleed profusely.
 
Apr 21, 2012
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Stephen_M said:
Indeed, blood doping does make your blood thicker, which would mean it would coagulate more quickly (ie stop bleeding). Avoiding giving non-negative doping controls when you're blood doping, involves thinning your blood (either through volume, or using anticoagulents like warfarin). If you're taking anticoagulents, then it is really difficult to stop bleeding and something, like a pesky altitude nosebleed for example, could bleed profusely.
In "Secret Défonce" ex-doper Erwann Menthéour explained he had a massive nosebleed after his Hct reached 56%, maybe due to blood pressure, and had to call "il dottore" (Ferrari ?) to knows what to do. That was in '96 pre-50% limit of course (Menthéour was one of the first 3 riders to be stopped for high Hct in 1997 on Paris-Nice, with Colombo and Santaromita).
 
Afrank said:
Well it wasn't just "a" Pesky nosebleed. It was 3-5 a day, plus even waking up with blood in his mouth. And it was also the doctors decision to have him withdraw, not his.
Sounds like early onset bilharzia to me.

Seriously though, I've had nose periods due to the dry air at altitude. Would not stop for 20 minutes on a climb. It was beyond annoying.
 
May 7, 2009
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I also had nosebleeds when I moved to Colorado.. they are a pain... Can't imagine trying to ride a bike, much less race, when this is happening.
 
Deagol said:
I also had nosebleeds when I moved to Colorado.. they are a pain... Can't imagine trying to ride a bike, much less race, when this is happening.
when your heart is pumping hard and blood spurting all over! Doesn't sound like a good idea does it?

btw did you get to go to a stage?:)
 
May 7, 2009
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mewmewmew13 said:
when your heart is pumping hard and blood spurting all over! Doesn't sound like a good idea does it?

btw did you get to go to a stage?:)
Fortunately, I moved here over 20 years ago and that problem only lasted a few months. I can't imagine trying to ride a bike with that...

Hah, I did not get to see a stage this year, but I've become a little burned out on the race, to be honest.

I've talked to co-workers who have TV and they both said the coverage sucks (which I have no trouble believing), They still use Phil & Paul and treat American fans like babys- every single year- explaining the most basic elements of bike racing like you would have either A) not known, or B) would have forgotten since last year.. and have spent far too long on it.

A friend told me that the coverage put the race itself in third place: number one was tourism (Co is crowded enough as it is), number two was marketing for sponsors, and number three was the race itself.

the course this year was... meh ?
 

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