• The Cycling News forum is looking to add some volunteer moderators with Red Rick's recent retirement. If you're interested in helping keep our discussions on track, send a direct message to @SHaines here on the forum, or use the Contact Us form to message the Community Team.

    In the meanwhile, please use the Report option if you see a post that doesn't fit within the forum rules.

    Thanks!

A disspointed fan, who feels the same way and can console

Mar 13, 2009
16,854
1
0
Visit site
first emotion:

betrayal

(just intuition)

then sad and angry.

Might have a look at 2005 Tour de Swiss, and another pursuiter, MCgee. MCgee lost about 4 or 5 kgs over his career. If he maintained the weight and focussed on pursuit efforts, I am very confident, he would have been faster than Wiggins in the pursuit.

Look how Mcgee climbed in 2004 Giro, and a few Tour de Suisse years. He could hang, but usually the final stage in the mtns, and was a clean stage, he would be dropped.

I think GB are on a transfusion program, I feel betrayed by the sport. Do I want to assume the worst? What do you think. I have a visceral feeling in the gut, a betrayal. Why have hope?

There are performances that get a "pass" because they are anglophones. Anyone else, the boot would be in.

I also get very suspicious about assertions to justify performances, ahead of said performances. Explanations seeded in the media, about a trackie losing 6 kgs. Will it soon be 8 kgs?

Wiggins won 2 stages of l'Avenir, a prologue, and a stage beating Saul Raisin after a two-up breakaway. He had barely done a thing on the road. MCgee only won either Dunkirk or Sarthe, and was a stage hunter for his career. Defended and hung on for grim death in 2004 or 2005 Giro. He was about 74 kg I assume, in Atlanta Olympics, rode for FDJ at about 73, when focused on GC got down to perhaps 71, or even 70, then perhaps lost one more, throught a race like 2005 or 2005 Giro. Think it was '04. Cunego v Simoni infighting year. He lost the weight, he was a 4'14" pursuiter if he never lost the weight and compromise track souplesse, as was, he was a 4'16" low PB at Edinburgh Comm Games.

It is not just the weight, it is the recovery function. Two of the most talented riders of the French modern era are Moncoutie and Casar. Moncoutie can about 11th or 12th in 2001, when he was still riding in the peloton, and shills (very angry) like Liggett spout a soundbite about he accepted his limitations and could only try to win stages. My heiglight in 2007 was Casar beating Boogerd and the group off the front, I jumped off the couch in paroxysms of joy.

note to Bradley Wiggins:
Brad, I want to believe, but I can't. Who owes who the apology?


no flames guys, I want it clean, but this perhaps, is the last straw.

Does anyone feel like me?


If they are all gonna dope, are we are gonna be dopes (dupes), how about some diplomatic transparency? "I never cheated my fellow riders" would suffice. But from now, if I watch, I will no longer watch with any passion.
 
Mar 13, 2009
683
0
0
Visit site
You make a good point about seeding a news story in the media prior to expected form improvement. It makes me suspicious as well as it was the MO of a certain somebody.

As for McGee, still one of my favourite riders and classiest guys around. I remember there was a letter he wrote that really earned my respect more than anything he did on the bike. I believe it was in response to some doping issue, but in it, he was as staunchly anti-doping as I've heard. Great letter that was full of passion and vigour. I wish I could find a link for it.

I'll give Wiggins the benefit of the doubt for the time being. His anti-doping stance does carry some weight.
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,854
1
0
Visit site
unsheath said:
You make a good point about seeding a news story in the media prior to expected form improvement. It makes me suspicious as well as it was the MO of a certain somebody.

As for McGee, still one of my favourite riders and classiest guys around. I remember there was a letter he wrote that really earned my respect more than anything he did on the bike. I believe it was in response to some doping issue, but in it, he was as staunchly anti-doping as I've heard. Great letter that was full of passion and vigour. I wish I could find a link for it.

I'll give Wiggins the benefit of the doubt for the time being. His anti-doping stance does carry some weight.
which is why I want to believe in him.
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,854
1
0
Visit site
issoisso said:
That's from Beijing. Immediately before he started to train on the road and to lose weight :)
he is 71 or 70.5 now. Where is the "8" figure? Is the 8 from his heaviest in the off-season. On that, Jan Ullrich probably lost 20 kgs for the Tour.
 
Jul 20, 2009
1
0
0
Visit site
Gone too far

Why would anyone work hard to achieve anything in cycling anymore when as soon as you do anything good, everyone cries "doping!" If that's how you feel about the support, go watch football or tennis - everyone knows that they're all clean in those sports.

Look I despise doping as much as the next guy - I've felt betrayed and let down, too. But let's get some perspective. Whatever happened to "better that 10 guilty men go free, than one innocent suffer?"

I'm skeptical too, but it's hard for me to justify writing off a guy who prior to this tour was thought to be a standard bearer (particularly in the UK) for the the anti-doping movement, for no other reason than he has done well.

Who knows? Maybe he is, maybe he isn't. I'd prefer to suspend judgment until there's more concrete proof than very good performances in an unusually easy Tour.
 
bicycle-papa said:
Why would anyone work hard to achieve anything in cycling anymore when as soon as you do anything good, everyone cries "doping!" If that's how you feel about the support, go watch football or tennis - everyone knows that they're all clean in those sports.

Look I despise doping as much as the next guy - I've felt betrayed and let down, too. But let's get some perspective. Whatever happened to "better that 10 guilty men go free, than one innocent suffer?"

I'm skeptical too, but it's hard for me to justify writing off a guy who prior to this tour was thought to be a standard bearer (particularly in the UK) for the the anti-doping movement, for no other reason than he has done well.

Who knows? Maybe he is, maybe he isn't. I'd prefer to suspend judgment until there's more concrete proof than very good performances in an unusually easy Tour.
Sounds like JV.

We'll wait for Ventoux.
 
Jul 14, 2009
2,498
0
0
Visit site
Bos is the trifecta.Higher saddle,lower weight and the guy hooks people in every sprint ala Cav.Bos will wear green in next years tour.I hope he gets the call from Armstrong's new team.