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Bike for Big Lad

Jul 3, 2009
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Hi I'm looking to get a road bike but the issue I have is I'm 6'3" and 16 stone.

Budget is £1,000-£1,500. Does anybody have any recommendations and do road bikes have weight limits attached to them?

Or am I better off waiting until I lose some of my excess weight and carry on using my MTB for now??

Cheers
 
Mar 19, 2009
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16 Stone if I'm correct is 224 US pounds. That's not really heavy at all.

What kind of riding do you want it for? ..... racing, sport, or touring etc.


I divide this answer into 2 parts. The frame. The wheels.

Road bikes don't have weight limits. Wheels need to be built well though. A Professional built wheelset that "stands" is worth it's weight in gold and will make most frames worthwhile to ride. By "stand" I mean it stays true and round for the user once it leaves the wheelbuilers hands.
By todays standards though, I would be considered "old school", as I like 3 cross double-butted spoked wheels made by hand, not a machine.

Prebuilt bike these days though generally come with low spoke count wheels and radial lacing. I have no idea how they would hold up for you.

I'm a hare taller than you, and I have been your weight years ago when I rode a Reynolds 531C racing frame and 36 hole 3X wheels and had no problems with the frame. So, any frame will be fine for you.

If you get a prebuilt bike though, try to get it from a shop that can make sure the wheels are true and round, and have the spokes pre-stressed, BEFORE you ride the bike. If they don't know what this is, find someone who does. This will make your wheels more durable from the start.

That's about all I can offer you, as I'm not up on pre-built bikes anymore, I put bikes together part by part these days.
 
Jul 3, 2009
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Thanks for the indepth reply thats greatly appreciated, I'll speak to my LBS and ask them all the things you mentioned so that hopefully they don't try and fleece me.

Once again thanks
 
Apr 25, 2009
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Hello mate,

I read an article that recently recommended the Giant TCR's for heavier riders, Cannondale Super 6's, Storck Fascenarios (probably a bit pricey though) and Colnago EPS'. Hope this helps.:)
 
Jul 3, 2009
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Try a Focus from wiggle...I managed to pick a frame(second hand unused Izalco carbon) up for this season, am 6'4" weighed 224lbs at start of the season and have had no problems.
 
So I am 6'6'' and 220 - 225 lbs

I have ridden a number of different frames and wheels over the years and never had any problems - and I've raced, commuted and generally thrashed around the place for 25 yrs.

No having said that - cheap wheels just don't cut it - not just from the performance perspective but they bent and shed spokes like leaves in the fall!

I used to ride a mid range mavic rims with campag hubs and fairly conventional spoke configuration and never had any problems. More recently I started riding on Campag Eurus wheels - they are mid profile rims and seem to be a little stiffer - they have more wacky spoke (Bladed - G3) configuration but they have been bomb proof for me - and they look really cool too ;) - I have also ridden Scirrocco wheels no problems with these either.

I have ridden lots of steel frames and have a really nice titanium frame with slightly oversized tubing and carbon forks Alpha Q Z Pro

http://www.truetemper.com/Performance_Tubing/zpro.asp -

they are a little more chunkie and have a longer steerer - but again although I ride this I am not sure I really need it.

The other thing to think about is crank length - there is a lot more choice out there for longer cranks and you won't be surprised to learn I ride a 180mm crank :D You can pick up older model campag record 180mm cranks and lot's of companies make them now - just google 180mm crank. Zinn in boulder has some great info on this stuff - he even makes custom cranks!

Last point which maybe more general but - one thing that transformed my riding and particulalry my ability to climb steeper and longer (more alpine type mountains) was paying attention to gearing. I experimented with some pretty low gear ratios and got better at staying sat down and spinning. It made a big difference not having to get 220lbs out of the saddle on a regular basis on a climb. There are lots of ways to do this with compact chain rings, triple chain rings...and you have to be creative to get a 180mm crank compact / tripple chain set but there are ways... you can get triplizer chain rings... anyway probably too much detail here. Drop me a note if you want any more info.

Have fun
 
Jun 13, 2009
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180mmCrank said:
So I am 6'6'' and 120 - 125 lbs

:eek:

Eat something...eat anything...
Here print this out and eat it...
big_meal.jpg
 
Mar 12, 2009
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I'm 6'7" 220lbs and have a Marinoni with Columbus Spirit tubing- very happy with it. Marinonis are built in Montreal so not real practical if you're in the UK but check out bikes with that tubing. Probably the ultimate for big ******s like us is the Colnago Extreme Power- no weight limit and up to 65cm sizes. You will need to rob a bank for one, so again not real practical. For wheels- Mavic CXP 33's with 32 spokes are reasonably light, super-strong and cheap. Hope this helps.
 
Mar 12, 2009
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So you are 6'3 and 100kgs.........thats not massive compared to the general community.

Get a solid Alu frame, 105 or above and main consideration is wheels, Marinoni above has nailed it, Mavic CXP33s with Ultegra hubs would be a great sturdy wheel for a 100kg rider.