How to win as an attacker on the Champs-Elysees?

Apr 30, 2014
202
0
0
The last time an attack succeeded in Paris was in 2005 with Vinokourov winning the stage. He attacked together with Bradley McGee with less than 3 kilometers to go, they worked well together and managed to stay clear.
Cancellara went after them with 1k to go and could secure himself the third place.

What were the reasons that these attacks could succeed?

I'd like to hear your thoughts but here are mine: The weather. It was raining which favours the attacker. Somehow the peloton was stretched out but at the same time the sprinters' teams had run out of power when the fun began. Lastly clinical reasons come into my mind which we cannot discuss here.

When were other times that the finale Tour stage was not decided in a bunch sprint?

Why does it happen so seldomly?
The real action only begins with 50k to go inside of Paris. As a result the sprinters teams are well rested in the finale. A break could go early but this is against the unwritten codex. It rarely rains in Paris and tommorow will be no different. The streets are wide and the corners fast.

How could it be achieved nonetheless?
With John Degenkolb as the third or thourth last man, Giant is hard to beat in the last 3 kms.
Instead a longer attack might have a better chance of succeeding. The group musn't be too small and needs enough horsepower.
Theoretically it may work like this: With 7 k to go OPQS comes to the front (too early for a pure leadout but they always do it) and line out the field. At the hairpin the last man of the train (probably Renshaw) intententiontally slows down and lets a gap. As soon as they are free it would be a team trial of 4-6 strong guys including Tony Martin against the peloton. However even without OPQS there are too many teams (Lotto, Giant, Katusha, Cannondale) who want a bunch sprint. And even more important is that probably OPQS will not even try and just do a classic leadout for Renshaw who will eventually finish between 4th and 6th.


I'm looking forward to hear your thoughts on the matter.
 
Apr 30, 2014
202
0
0
Netserk said:
If Tony gets a gap within the last 5km, no team will catch him.
I'm not sure about this. The longer the time trial the stronger Tony is. He's not able to win a stage from the flame rouge like Cancellara did it in Compiegne.
 
Jul 7, 2014
149
0
0
In 2005, green jersey ranking: Hushovd, O'grady, Mc Ewen, Vinokourov.
I think few teams but Mc Ewen's lotto really wanted a sprint.

It won't be the same tomorrow, too much teams will work for a sprint
 
Apr 30, 2014
202
0
0
difdauf said:
In 2005, green jersey ranking: Hushovd, O'grady, Mc Ewen, Vinokourov.
I think few teams but Mc Ewen's lotto really wanted a sprint.

It won't be the same tomorrow, too much teams will work for a sprint
Ah, that's interesting. Why didn't O'Grady want a Sprint? Couldn't he'd have won the Green and the stage?
 
Every year we discuss the chances of somebody doing a Vino, and every year we come to the conclusion that sadly, it is unlikely to happen again. Hopes may rise this year given that the sprint teams have been somewhat weaker about getting to the breakaway - failing on a couple of occasions and only just catching Bauer and Elmiger last weekend. But not too high, as the Champs Elysées stage is all about the sprint and most teams will be anticipating it.
 
Here's a recipe.
Prepare three riders. One sprinter and a couple of time trialists. You can use rouleurs if can't find time trialists.
First, you fold one of the time trialists/rouleurs in the almost cooked Champs Elysees garnish while the peloton is still simmering.
Keep the other time trialist/rouleur and the sprinter close to the lid while the first time trialist/rouleur boils alone. If the simmering peloton cools down - the better. You've got yourself a nice boiled winner. But if not, which is more often the case, repeat the procedure from the almost cooked moment and simmering peloton with the other time trialist/rouleur.
Remember that you have the sprinter close to the lid to serve him in case the both time trialists/rouleurs burn. The sprinter should be nice, soft and fresh simmering with the peloton.
The success of recipe hugely depends on the ingredients.
Enjoy!
 
thequestionmark said:
I just found out that Eddy Seigneur managed to pull a vino in 1994. Who knows more about the circumstances?
6 riders got away in a break on Champs Elysées: Eddy Seigneur, Frankie Andreu, Bo Hamburger, Jörg Müller, Arturas Kasputis & Abdoujaparov. Andreu attacked on the last lap but was catched 150m from the finish by Eddy Seigneur. Bo Hamburger won the sprint among the remaining 4 guys in the break (source: old archive from syklingensverden.com)
 
vino4-ever

Libertine Seguros said:
Every year we discuss the chances of somebody doing a Vino, and every year we come to the conclusion that sadly, it is unlikely to happen again. Hopes may rise this year given that the sprint teams have been somewhat weaker about getting to the breakaway - failing on a couple of occasions and only just catching Bauer and Elmiger last weekend. But not too high, as the Champs Elysées stage is all about the sprint and most teams will be anticipating it.
And the amount of crap I used to get here for being an unabashed and enthusiastic Vino fan...

Vino was the most combative, attacking rider of his generation, a truly compelling character whose riding was more charismatic than his public persona, leaving him nevertheless adored by many - even after he was revealed in part to be a...product of his environment, shall we say?

Writing after the finish of the 2005 TdF, Rupert Guinness said:

"Foremost of the day’s surprises was the winner on the Champs-Élysées, the most attacking rider of the peloton, the ever-popular Kazakhstan national champion Alex Vinokourov (T-Mobile)...Wherever he winds up, Vinokourov, whose attacking style contradicts the Armstrong doctrine (“one attack, two good time trials”), has won the hearts of many at this Tour."

And then only Vino could bow out of cycling with such panache and style, winning the 2012 Olympic RR in London with a classic, tactically-astute, technically perfect attack, before crushing young upstart Rigoberto Uran in a two-up sprint that was never really in doubt.

Amazing that Guardian published this piece afterwards:

London 2012: Give Olympic champion Alexandr Vinokourov a break - "Kazakhstan rider should be remembered as an exciting cyclist, who rode a good race at London 2012, and not a drugs cheat"

vino4-ever
 
Libertine Seguros said:
Every year we discuss the chances of somebody doing a Vino, and every year we come to the conclusion that sadly, it is unlikely to happen again. Hopes may rise this year given that the sprint teams have been somewhat weaker about getting to the breakaway - failing on a couple of occasions and only just catching Bauer and Elmiger last weekend. But not too high, as the Champs Elysées stage is all about the sprint and most teams will be anticipating it.
Vino was just a beast on that stage. He decided that he would not be denied moving up in the gc snatching Levi Leipheimer's spot above his by snatching seconds on a sprint bonus all while battling and abusing Leipheimer and his Gerolsteiner domestiques who were all powerless to stop him. Then, as the icing on the cake he takes the stage win also from a breakaway. Clinic issues or not it was quite beautiful to behold. It is/was the stuff of legend.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY