Is There Weight Limit for Trek Bikes?

Jun 9, 2014
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Hi Everyone,

I bought an x Caliber 29ers bike yesterday to use it for exercising and loosing weight based on the recommendation of the sales person at the shop. I am around 380 lb (172 KG) and would like to know if the bike can handle my weight?! I am mainly concerned about the wheels spokes to get damaged as another sales person from different shop has told me that all Terk bikes can not handle anything more than 264 lb (120 KG) where the spokes will defiantly get damaged.

Who is saying the correct statement?

I paid a lot for this bike and considered it as an investment to help me loose weight and be on shape and I don't want to loose this investment. I have seen people bigger than me using Terk bikes and they lost at least half of their weight with it and that what motivated me.

P.S. I am going to use on road only with care.
 
mazen97 said:
Hi Everyone,

I bought an x Caliber 29ers bike yesterday to use it for exercising and loosing weight based on the recommendation of the sales person at the shop. I am around 380 lb (172 KG) and would like to know if the bike can handle my weight?! I am mainly concerned about the wheels spokes to get damaged as another sales person from different shop has told me that all Terk bikes can not handle anything more than 264 lb (120 KG) where the spokes will defiantly get damaged.

Who is saying the correct statement?

I paid a lot for this bike and considered it as an investment to help me loose weight and be on shape and I don't want to loose this investment. I have seen people bigger than me using Terk bikes and they lost at least half of their weight with it and that what motivated me.

P.S. I am going to use on road only with care.
I found on the TREK website by clicking on Q&A
that the maximum rider weight for their mountain
bikes is 136kg/300lbs.

It makes me very sad that a bike store would
sell you an unsuitable machine. I'm no expert,
but I would suggest a bike without suspension.
Hopefully some more knowledgeable riders
can give you some more complete advice.

I wish you the best of luck in getting a suitable
bike and then enjoying it to the fullest, my friend.
 
Reactions: GG441
Mazen, you should definitely consider returning that bike if oldcrank's information is correct! You don't want to be constantly taking your new ride into the shop for repairs as you begin your journey toward fitness, and I'm confident that there's a good bike out there that you can navigate with fewer concerns than that Trek. Good luck!
 
Have you considered some other form of weight loss to begin with? Diet and walking will have a big impact to begin with.

Chances are the bike will be fine, the maximum weight for their mountain bikes must take into account the intended use for the bike and if you are riding it on flat roads it'll be under a lot less stress than it would be if you were sending it down a trail.
 
Aug 6, 2011
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King Boonen said:
Chances are the bike will be fine, the maximum weight for their mountain bikes must take into account the intended use for the bike and if you are riding it on flat roads it'll be under a lot less stress than it would be if you were sending it down a trail.
From a practical point of view, I agree; the bike will probably handle the weight just fine if you're going to use it on a flat surface. However, you might also want to consider the legal consequences: Using a bike outside of its set weight limit might void the warranty.
 
Mar 27, 2015
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They are unapologetic litigants using intellectual property law to protect themselves from legitimate competition.



_____________


haneeya
 
Jul 27, 2009
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8,510
It should be fine with beefing up the Tires (widest that'll fit the frame) & avoiding Jumps, Rock drops & any move seen in a Mountain Dew commercial.
PS Check occasionally foe cracking at weld points on the frame, if you notice any take it back to the shop & trek will send you a brand new shiny frame.
 
Apr 23, 2015
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Sorry to hear the bike shop didnt do the best thing for you. However if you're gentle with the bike, don't hammer it off road, avoid bunny hops and manage to stick to a good eating plan both the bike and your own long term health will last. Good luck Mazen!
 
Jul 26, 2020
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Hey Mazen, any update on your original question?

I’m 341lbs, 6’4” rugby player and have just bought a beautiful Trek X-caliber 8 29er 2021 to improve my fitness and lose some weight. The website suggests 300lbs max weight limit, but I’m planning on riding cross country and not jumping of anything; it’ll be trails, tracks and hillsides for me. I’ve also bought some carbon riser bars, Deore XT pedals, and a carbon bottle cage to keep the weight down.

Have you had any issues?
 
Hey Mazen, any update on your original question?

I’m 341lbs, 6’4” rugby player and have just bought a beautiful Trek X-caliber 8 29er 2021 to improve my fitness and lose some weight. The website suggests 300lbs max weight limit, but I’m planning on riding cross country and not jumping of anything; it’ll be trails, tracks and hillsides for me. I’ve also bought some carbon riser bars, Deore XT pedals, and a carbon bottle cage to keep the weight down.

Have you had any issues?
This is a pretty old thread so you may not get responses from many of the participants.


If you're over the weight limit I'd suggest keeping to fire roads and smooth forest tracks while you start off. Of course, if something fails there's no way Trek would know what weight you are... The pedals should be fine but I'd leave the carbon bars off until you get your weight down. They won't save that much weight compared to the overall weight of you and the bike and I've seen a good few snap when being ridden by lighter people on road bikes.

Hope you enjoy it. I came from a rugby background and dropped a lot of weight in the first few months just taking it easy, adapting my diet and getting out there riding whenever I could. Good luck.
 
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