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Lachlan Morton

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Drinking picke juice is a whole vibe unto itself

They gave away samples at Redlands and I re-gave it away without trying it
 
And he knows how to ride like a Pro in the last few feet of a 203 mile race against another Pro. Exceptional and the "amateur" band-aid on gravel is seriously ripped off.
Haven't heard what VanAvermaet had to say, yet. I'm thinking those guys are wondering if this was the best first choice after retiring from the World Tour? Ouch.
you definitely want to make it sound like Morton and Haga were riding on demi-god level.

Sorry to burst your bubble but:
Zonneveld (an old retired journalist) forced that move before he flatted.
Van Avermaet (an old retired ex-pro, riding approx. 70% of the training volume of Morton and Haga) flatted twice in the first 100K and had to come back twice.
Mohoric broke his rim.

Other heavyweight contestants / big guns in the top 10: Kongstad, Havik, Mattia De Marchi, Svendsen, McElveen, Schönberger and Johnson.

In other words: 2 guys (Morton and Haga) were among 3 ex-world tour pros in the top 10, didn't suffer mechanicals and thus not coincidentally they got 1st and 2nd. They're no slouches, no amateurs and the best of the day, but to try and lift their efforts because GvA competed...
 
you definitely want to make it sound like Morton and Haga were riding on demi-god level.

Sorry to burst your bubble but:
Zonneveld (an old retired journalist) forced that move before he flatted.
Van Avermaet (an old retired ex-pro, riding approx. 70% of the training volume of Morton and Haga) flatted twice in the first 100K and had to come back twice.
Mohoric broke his rim.

Other heavyweight contestants / big guns in the top 10: Kongstad, Havik, Mattia De Marchi, Svendsen, McElveen, Schönberger and Johnson.

In other words: 2 guys (Morton and Haga) were among 3 ex-world tour pros in the top 10, didn't suffer mechanicals and thus not coincidentally they got 1st and 2nd. They're no slouches, no amateurs and the best of the day, but to try and lift their efforts because GvA competed...
The best gravel racer on the planet had an 'off' day', people had flats/mechanicals (most notable Moh)...its called racing, sh*t happens (especially in a 9 hour race). Morton won. I'm not not sure what the point of degrading the racers is. How 'bout calling out all of the 'much better' racers for not having the guts to show up?
 
you definitely want to make it sound like Morton and Haga were riding on demi-god level.

Sorry to burst your bubble but:
Zonneveld (an old retired journalist) forced that move before he flatted.
Van Avermaet (an old retired ex-pro, riding approx. 70% of the training volume of Morton and Haga) flatted twice in the first 100K and had to come back twice.
Mohoric broke his rim.

Other heavyweight contestants / big guns in the top 10: Kongstad, Havik, Mattia De Marchi, Svendsen, McElveen, Schönberger and Johnson.

In other words: 2 guys (Morton and Haga) were among 3 ex-world tour pros in the top 10, didn't suffer mechanicals and thus not coincidentally they got 1st and 2nd. They're no slouches, no amateurs and the best of the day, but to try and lift their efforts because GvA competed...
Tell me you're an ignorant 'roadie' without telling me you're an ignorant 'roadie'.....

Not flatting is part of off-road racing.....Picking the right tyres & pressures, equipment, etc It's not always bad luck as the road commentators tell you.
 
Tell me you're an ignorant 'roadie' without telling me you're an ignorant 'roadie'.....

Not flatting is part of off-road racing.....Picking the right tyres & pressures, equipment, etc It's not always bad luck as the road commentators tell you.
Back in the late 90s before tubeless dirt tires became the norm, I was preparing for one of the biggest regional races of the early season, and decided to make some 'race light' slime tubes because of the potential for goat head flats at this venue. The trails weren't too bad because its an ORV area so the motos clear out most of the goat heads, but it only takes one to kill a race. My serious pro days had ended because I had a full time job, but on my good days I could still stand on the box, but realistically was fifth or six guy in the region. Early in the race we had a six man hammer fest going when the leader jumped off to fix a flat, then two more guys within a mile. The three of us who remained kicked the crap out of each other for another hour and a half and I was able to escape on a steep section that the other two had to dismount on. Was that a lucky win because I didn't flat? A smart win because of my tube choice? I think the later. The other two, one used off the shelf slime tubes, and the other used tire liners. We all three had goat heads in our tires, but no flats.

I also never used 'semi slick' race tires either because they presented too much risk IMO (failure, sketchy handling, less braking precision...).
 
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I'm assessing purely the performance part, and that was in reaction to someone assessing the performance part, suggesting that Morton / Haga did a pro-tour level effort as if GvA was the golden standard for reference.

I didn't degrade any of those riders by saying as it is: a top performance among a bunch of retired undertrained pro riders mixed with very good level semi-pro enthusiasts.

Don't reverse that reality thinking some of those lesser road riders that top the gravel scene are actually gravel beasts and wouldn't even make the top 10 if the Paris-Roubaix pro tour field would bother to show up.
Just to touch on one focus point of yours, who thought that GvA was going to win? Not me, but I think that he did.

I actually thought that it was risky for Moh because what happens if the World Gravel champ and current road pro gets smoked by the gravel "semi pro enthusiasts"? Could MvdP win, absolutely. Could 97% of road pros win, no.

You are degrading then again, but calling them "semi pro enthusiasts", IMO.
 
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Almost no one in the top 10 this year had bad luck. It goes to show that the repairing the bike talent is no factor in winning: Either you are trouble free and you have a chance to win, or you have trouble and chances are gone.
You make it sound like the current crop of unbound is a special breed in terms of repairing, more special than any random weekend warrior on an mtb, cx guys,… you would be amazed how many pros ride a fat tire bike in winter and have to do repairs themselves if something happens.
The" repairing their own bike" part was mostly sarcasm. "Crushing the field" is nonsense.
 
It’s not rocket science.
Neither is this: A road pro at Tro Bro Leon, who finished just off the podium averaged 3.64 w/kg with an average weighted power of 4.43 w/kg for 5:10. A "semi pro enthusiast" who finished outside the top 10 at Outbound averaged 4.14 w/kg with an average weighted power of 4.47w/kg for 9:14. They weigh within 1 kg of each other. So, I guess there are probably a bunch of triathletes out their that could just go podium Tro Bro Leon if they chose to waist their afternoon.
 
He aimed for a top 10, he said in interviews.
It goes to show that you are the one that is smirking when you see GvA got 7th and you imagined he was dreaming of winning. Sorry to burst your bubble, because he wasn't dreaming. Bakelants and Zonneveld were aiming higher (i.e. a podium or a win), but both got punctures while still in the position to reach their goals.

If you can't name 7-8 road riders that would push 7-8 riders out of the current top 10, it goes to show there is no logic in your resaoning, because Haga and Morton were road riders, and they got 1st and 2nd and that's no coincidence: they are / were pro tour worthy and age-wise still in their prime.
You should ask yourself why the riders that took top positions were both ex-pro tour road riders, and why did they win so little when it they had a well-paid pro-tour contract and aren't on the road anymore? It's not because they had the choice of staying.

What else than semi-pro enthusiasts are guys like Kongstad, Havik, Svendsen, De Marchi, MvElveen and Johnson, all in the top 10? They have sponsors but we can't say they earn big money with riding a bike. Some of them are riding continental, some have ridden pro continental, even fewer were pro tour trainee.
Would you call them pro? or semi-pro non-enthusiasts? They obviously ride races like unbound because they like the adventure and stories they can tell, more than the paycheck they receive for riding it.

In the end, you may say that those that were present and competing are the righty winners, and those that didn't show up shouldn't be mentioned as potential winners. But I wasn't the one starting this by claiming "Exceptional and the "amateur" band-aid on gravel is seriously ripped off" while it's clearly still a race for afficionados and the occasional pro, not having the depth of field to say this is representative of a top gravel starting field.

ps: GvA may be ex-pro tour and that's obviously a better reference for him, but effectively, at this moment he is also just a semi pro enthusiast.
You clearly don't like gravel racing so I'm not sure why you want to post about it other than to dismiss it, and fire up those of us who find some entertainment in this crazy throw back.

"Sorry to burst your bubble": I am a GvA fan, have been for many years, but I'm also realistic enough to know that he can't just walk in to an event like this.

Noted: anyone not in the pro tour is an enthusiast, got it.

EDIT: OK, I just read two more of your posts, you're not being serious.
 
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You should ask yourself why the riders that took top positions were both ex-pro tour road riders, and why did they win so little when it they had a well-paid pro-tour contract and aren't on the road anymore? It's not because they had the choice of staying.
Chad Haga played a role for Tom Dumoulin and others over the years in much the same way that Tim Declercq did for his teammates. Not a big or frequent winner, but a well-compensated member of the peloton doing an important job.

When Lachlan Morton was racing for GC he won Utah and Gila tours and was frequently finishing in the company of guys like Tao Geoghan Hart on GC at those races and California, etc. He absolutely had the choice of staying in the World Tour, and has the physical talent to do so, but admitted that mentally that grind wasn't for him.

Top gravel racers like Keegan Swenson and previously Colin Strickland had offers from World Tour teams but declined, as their present line of racing and sponsorship was more lucrative. Payson McElveen is a Red Bull athlete, a company that doesn't sponsor a lot of small-timers.

There is truth to the gravel-as-playground-for-retired-riders-and-low-level-road-pros, but at the very pointy end there are some World Tour level engines making WT-level money. The level is high enough that World Tour riders will need to do at least some sort of specific training and preparation with respect to equipment if they want to drop in and win an important race. How many WT riders train their 7+ hour power?