latex inner tubes 18mm on a 23 tyre

Sep 14, 2009
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I have just bought a pair of Michelin aircom latex tubes, and the damping quality is really noticable. Down hill is superb!. going up hill though they flex a lot more especially on the front wheel..... So i have the 'feeling' they are slow when more weight is applied but that might be deceiving, how exactly does a tire roll??
even though you see and feel the flex, is the wheel rolling on more freely??

Has anyone else used the 18mm on a 23mm tyre?? NOT BUTYL ( which is standard) would be thinner, and on a clincher more puncture prone. later comments on this thread stress that latex require checking and dusting to maintain safety!
There are convergent ideas about latex vs Butyl: latex flex more and therefore have a lower rolling resistance some tests say otherwise....
just because the butyl is harder doesn't mean you are going faster OR? your ideas please!
 
Aug 7, 2010
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40 mph blowout!

We had a Latex let go on the front wheel of our tandem on a steep downhill. We hit the deck at 40mph :eek:(verified by the Max Speed on the computer). We don't use latex any more.
 
Sep 14, 2009
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Fausto's Schnauzer said:
We had a Latex let go on the front wheel of our tandem on a steep downhill. We hit the deck at 40mph :eek:(verified by the Max Speed on the computer). We don't use latex any more.
Sorry to hear it! but that is just circumstancial, ( did you test a butyl on the same hill, same heat, etc... ) don't mean to rub salt on the wounds! and Michelin is by far the best. butyl is stiffer, no doubt, but all tubulars use latex, and the latex tubes are very thin. regards
 
Aug 4, 2009
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One issue with latex on down hill is make sure the inside of tyre is dry and pleanty or talk or chaulk . in hot weather they will stick to the tyre and then may cause uneven tyre pressurs in certain spots.

On the front wheel this can cause a shimmy at high speed decending keep checking the tube every 6-8 weeks if it is distorted get rid of it before it gets rid of you.
Otherwise they feel great and are nice light I have the michilin and bontrager and both feel great while riding
 
Aug 4, 2009
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Gonkisback said:
Sorry to hear it! but that is just circumstancial, ( did you test a butyl on the same hill, same heat, etc... ) don't mean to rub salt on the wounds! and Michelin is by far the best. butyl is stiffer, no doubt, but all tubulars use latex, and the latex tubes are very thin. regards
There are a lot of tubulars that have butyl tubes these days but the good ones are latex
 
Gonkisback said:
Sorry to hear it! but that is just circumstancial, ( did you test a butyl on the same hill, same heat, etc... ) don't mean to rub salt on the wounds! and Michelin is by far the best. butyl is stiffer, no doubt, but all tubulars use latex, and the latex tubes are very thin. regards
Not all tubulars 'use latex'. Conti Sprinters, for example, a really nice, mid range tire uses butyl tubes.

20 grams? YGBSM..use the proper size. Using a smaller one makes the tube thinner when inflated, making it less safe.
 
Sep 14, 2009
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long time since I repaired or rode tubulars. thanks for the info. so giving them a regular talc dusting is the idea... yeah 20gms isn't worth worrying about. silly really. but good to be reminded that one must be careful. I used to have blow outs on my Clement silks, but the silk casing were worn or old. Latex is able to expand far more than Butyl so checking the casing would be a very good pre ride check, as once it blows you are in big trouble ( with a clincher that is).
Still nobody has responded to the effectiveness of the latex on a climb. I found them SLOW on a climb but is that because the flex is deceiving??????
 

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