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Looking to upgrade to good mid-priced wheels

I am interested in upgrading my wheels to a good mid-level but would like input. My current bike came with Mavic Aksiums and I would like to upgrade to something lighter and/or more aero. The region I ride in is mostly flat. Typically I ride 3-4 group rides a week of 30-50 miles @ 18+ mph. I have been entertaining the thought of either upgrading to Krysium SL's, or on the other end, something like the Sram S40 or S60. I have been following the bike build threads and these wheels have all been suggested. It would be helpful to know what people think of either of these choices or can refer any good reviews for wheels.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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I don't know what the SRAM wheels retail for where you live but I feel that they are overpriced for their weight in the UK market. HED Ardennes are my answer to almost every lightweight non-crit wheel choice question I get asked! They're incredibly versatile and rebuildable as well.
 
Jul 16, 2009
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the mavic sl are top marks, good value are in the in the fulcrum 3 and the finest wheels available mid range. never need trued, never seen the repair shop are campagnolo zondas.
either shimano or campy freehub.,1610 grams and bomb proof
 
Jun 16, 2009
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Not really more aero, but Shimano's RS-Eighty's are a nice set of reasonably light hoops. No idea about durability yet, but the science behind the design seems sound so I would expect them to be stronger than similar weight wheels with more traditional rims.

They don't look to bad either if your frame has some red in it's paint scheme...
 
the truth. said:
the mavic sl are top marks, good value are in the in the fulcrum 3 and the finest wheels available mid range. never need trued, never seen the repair shop are campagnolo zondas.
either shimano or campy freehub.,1610 grams and bomb proof

I ride Campag Eurus wheels - and I think they are the dogz. Bomb proof, light and they look cool too. :)
 
Jun 16, 2009
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**Uru** said:
I am interested in upgrading my wheels to a good mid-level but would like input. My current bike came with Mavic Aksiums and I would like to upgrade to something lighter and/or more aero. The region I ride in is mostly flat. Typically I ride 3-4 group rides a week of 30-50 miles @ 18+ mph. I have been entertaining the thought of either upgrading to Krysium SL's, or on the other end, something like the Sram S40 or S60. I have been following the bike build threads and these wheels have all been suggested. It would be helpful to know what people think of either of these choices or can refer any good reviews for wheels.
Are you set on pre-built wheels? If not, why not get some wheels built.

I'm just building up a set of wheels for my cross bike. I'm using Campag Daytona hubs (brand new - but a discontinued model - same as Record just with a heavier freewheel body), Open Pro rims and a pretty heavy gauge Wheelsmith DB14 spoke (since they're going to get a hammering). Total cost is about C$450 - and total weight is 1620g.

If however I was just building for road, I would use DT Revolution or similar, which would drop the weight down to about 1530g - at the same C$450 price.

Compare this to a set of Ksyrium SL's - 1485g and about C$1006 if I buy on line or C$1300 at my LBS ... That's a **** load of extra money to save stuff all weight ... Jeez, for that much price difference, you could get yourself a set of DT Swiss 240s hubs (and still have change) - I have the dirt version on my mountain bike and they are just gorgeous! Add to the cost difference the fact that hand built wheels are generally stronger, more durable and easier to maintain than factory built wheels and you understand some of why I like the hand built way ...

Regardless of which way you go, I'd suggest that your main point of focus should be getting something with good/fast rolling hubs rather than lightweight as your top priority. You say that you ride mainly on flat lands, so you'll notice the former far more than the latter ...
 
May 16, 2009
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badboyberty said:
Not really more aero, but Shimano's RS-Eighty's are a nice set of reasonably light hoops. No idea about durability yet, but the science behind the design seems sound so I would expect them to be stronger than similar weight wheels with more traditional rims.

They don't look to bad either if your frame has some red in it's paint scheme...

I've got the Shimano RS80's. These have been really great wheels. They use the same rim as Shimano's Dura-Ace 7850 C24 CL. The RS80's use and Ultegra hub so are a bit heavier overall but with the light weight rim they are pretty sweet.
 
**Uru** said:
I am interested in upgrading my wheels to a good mid-level but would like input. My current bike came with Mavic Aksiums and I would like to upgrade to something lighter and/or more aero. The region I ride in is mostly flat. Typically I ride 3-4 group rides a week of 30-50 miles @ 18+ mph. I have been entertaining the thought of either upgrading to Krysium SL's, or on the other end, something like the Sram S40 or S60. I have been following the bike build threads and these wheels have all been suggested. It would be helpful to know what people think of either of these choices or can refer any good reviews for wheels.

Krysiriums certainly aren't more aero and not much lighter either. Poor rear hub and expensive tho.

Why not visit a local wheelbuilder and have him design a wheelset specifically for you and your needs?

Using Campagnolo, shimano or DT hubs, Velocity, IRD, DT rims, DT or Sapim spokes.

The resulting wheelset will work well, be as light or lighter than those mentioned by you, be as aero or more and probably cost less. AND will use standard, easy to find components and be based on a much better hubset. Won't have red or yellow spokes or BIG decals and such but will be a nice wheelset.
 
Jul 11, 2009
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DO NOT GET MAVIC they are overpriced and heavy,

New shimano Ultegra and Dura Ace carbon laminates are where its at. Cheeper, lighter and more reliable than any mavic product.

The SRAM (flashpoint) are heavy and pricy. Also you dont have many options on windy days if you only own a set of deep dishes.
 
Mar 11, 2009
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LugHugger said:
I don't know what the SRAM wheels retail for where you live but I feel that they are overpriced for their weight in the UK market. HED Ardennes are my answer to almost every lightweight non-crit wheel choice question I get asked! They're incredibly versatile and rebuildable as well.

Just worked a set of Zipps for a tri person and of the 4 wheels, all were just horrible. All the teeny/tiny bearings(ceramic!) had to be replaced, the 'CSC team issue' fronts had the nipps bonded to the spokes so trying to true them(with a twist resist) resulting in 'barber-pole', twisted, icicle type spokes. Not impressed with these at all.
 
Jun 19, 2009
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Easton Circuit Comps are light, cheap and will last a season of training and racing at least. Usually run about $600 a pair and are lighter than most carbons. Not a super deep profile but you need to be super strong and fast to need a faster wheel anyway. You'll know when you've trained enough to need really expensive wheels.
 
May 3, 2009
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www.glorycycles.com
Tubeless

New 2010 Campagnolo will almost all be 2 way fit. Campagnolo also have the best hubs in the business and together this is a fantastic combo. Stiff, Fast and smooth rolling and the advantages of tubeless.
 
Jun 16, 2009
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I agree with Kiwi rider, go to a local builder and get some nice wheels built.
A nice set of Open Pros will last years, improve your ride quality & enjoyment and are not a great liability weight wise.
 
Thanks for all the advice. I have been waffling back and forth on whether I want aero or simply good/light training wheels. Probably the wise choice at this point would be to get the light training wheels. I will look and see if there are any good wheelbuilders in my area. A guy I ride with just got a set of Mavic open pro's made so I will ask him where he went. I figure there are lots of options to upgrade from what I currently have, Mavic Aksiums...
 
Aug 16, 2009
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Training wheels - comfort and reliability. If on Campy, then record hubs, 3x 32 lacing, and something like a DT Swiss 1.1 rim. Have them built. I consider weight and aero secondary in this group.

I am looking to pick up a pair of Campy Zonda's as a nice mid-price wheel to supplement my handbuilt daily riders.
 
53 x 11 said:
DO NOT GET MAVIC they are overpriced and heavy,

New shimano Ultegra and Dura Ace carbon laminates are where its at. Cheeper, lighter and more reliable than any mavic product.

The SRAM (flashpoint) are heavy and pricy. Also you dont have many options on windy days if you only own a set of deep dishes.

I am considering either the shimano Ultegra 6600 SL or the mavic equipe. both are the same weight (roughly) but the mavics are a tad cheaper. Anyone got either of these wheels? any good/bad experiences?
 
Cliveds said:
The new Zipp 101 looks like it's going to be fantastic! I can't wait to demo a pair.

Also on the hot list is Hed Ardennes, they are killer.

1485 grams and $1300...sorry, I don't get it. DT hubs, Velocity rims, DT spokes and 1500 grams and just a wee bit more than 1/2 the price.

PLUS, in 4 years when you wear out a rim, you can get a replacement. Probably not so with Zipp, they will have moved onto some other 'great' thing.
 

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