Music! What are you listening to now?

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I really don't like The River or Greetings from Asbury Park, I'm afraid, though Wreck on the Highway is awesome and no doubt they're a huge step up compred to the execrable Born in the USA. The title track from The River is one of my least favourite tracks of his, like a lot of his stuff it's a perfectly good song completely ruined by some awful Americana-AOR production and his patented "I'm starting off quiet and emotional, and finishing loud and anthemic" vocal stylings that I've never got on with. Maybe I'll check out the Ghost of Tom Joad. I did like Streets of Philadelphia I guess, but yea, I've never really got on with Springsteen with a full band sound, even if not all of it is as painfully overblown as Born to Run, or as awful as Dancing in the Dark. Everything sounds like it's got to sound huge even when the song should be intimate, and then you get the big build-ups, and it all feels very clichéd. That's why I like Nebraska, because they showcased that he could write great songs, and deliver them in an understated matter that let the song sink in, which I just feel he never did often enough for me. Even then, on Nebraska you've got the end of State Trooper where he quickly fades it off on what was clearly intended to become a big climactic rock ending.
 
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blackcat said:
what do you think of The National LS?

I bloody hate them, cos I think of the Staples/Tindersticks influence, with Springsteen running thru it... @ 3'15" just listening to Dean Wareham interview and he says something froll on Springsteen...


cos... Tindersticks are my favourite band. and people are talking Springsteen, and The National may be a gestalt bastard lovechild of Tindersticks and Springsteen.
I find them to be perfectly decent but very boring.
 
I think LS and I can't be reconciled because I like Americana and I like full band sounds. :p The more melancholic slow-paced songs are beautiful but listening to them all day long would make me even more depressed than I already am.

However I think we may agree that what makes Dancing in the Dark an awful song is this typically eighties keyboard/synthesizer sound but which fortunately did not stand the test of time. He gained huge success with that song at that time but I'm not sure many people are still listening to it today. "Born to Run" is punk rock for me, there's no melody in that, besides you have some awful synthesizer licks. I don't know how to explain why late seventies and eighties synthesizers sound so atrocious because the Mini Moog's of the late sixties and seventies are a pleasure to my ears. It's also the reason I don't like the Dire Straits of 1980 to 1985.

My favourite Springsteen, the one I kinda saved from his catalogue and which I still enjoy listening to is the 1985 Paris-Courneuve performance of Cadillac Ranch. I like that song for its country rock feel. But it's really Clarence Clemons driving it from start to finish. Though Bruce wrote the song, Big Man owns it, I'd say. And I'm pretty sure that Libs does not like it. :)

Oh well, I did like Springsteen's tribute to Pete Seeger of a few years back, too. "We Shall Overcome, the Pete Seeger Sessions"

Oh and every time I see Nils Lofgren on the stage, I'd like to give him a slap. :p

And I abhor "Streets of Philadelphia" but that has nothing to do with the song, more with the film that I couldn't stand.
 
Oct 23, 2011
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BigMac said:


16 Horsepower (and Wovenhand for that matter) are great! :)
I've been listening to them for a bunch of years now and David Eugene Edwards keeps on producing nice stuff in the form of Wovenhand. I haven't really gotten into Wovenhand's last album yet though, it's a bit dense for me so far.

In the mean time I'm listening to something a bit different
Roland Dyens - My Funny Valentine
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2TVjB87dyY
 
Mar 13, 2009
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Echoes said:
I think LS and I can't be reconciled because I like Americana and I like full band sounds. :p The more melancholic slow-paced songs are beautiful but listening to them all day long would make me even more depressed than I already am.

However I think we may agree that what makes Dancing in the Dark an awful song is this typically eighties keyboard/synthesizer sound but which fortunately did not stand the test of time. He gained huge success with that song at that time but I'm not sure many people are still listening to it today. "Born to Run" is punk rock for me, there's no melody in that, besides you have some awful synthesizer licks. I don't know how to explain why late seventies and eighties synthesizers sound so atrocious because the Mini Moog's of the late sixties and seventies are a pleasure to my ears. It's also the reason I don't like the Dire Straits of 1980 to 1985.

My favourite Springsteen, the one I kinda saved from his catalogue and which I still enjoy listening to is the 1985 Paris-Courneuve performance of Cadillac Ranch. I like that song for its country rock feel. But it's really Clarence Clemons driving it from start to finish. Though Bruce wrote the song, Big Man owns it, I'd say. And I'm pretty sure that Libs does not like it. :)

Oh well, I did like Springsteen's tribute to Pete Seeger of a few years back, too. "We Shall Overcome, the Pete Seeger Sessions"

Oh and every time I see Nils Lofgren on the stage, I'd like to give him a slap. :p

And I abhor "Streets of Philadelphia" but that has nothing to do with the song, more with the film that I couldn't stand.

what about Mercury Rev, they come out of "The Band" influence
 
blackcat said:
Echoes said:
I think LS and I can't be reconciled because I like Americana and I like full band sounds. :p The more melancholic slow-paced songs are beautiful but listening to them all day long would make me even more depressed than I already am.

However I think we may agree that what makes Dancing in the Dark an awful song is this typically eighties keyboard/synthesizer sound but which fortunately did not stand the test of time. He gained huge success with that song at that time but I'm not sure many people are still listening to it today. "Born to Run" is punk rock for me, there's no melody in that, besides you have some awful synthesizer licks. I don't know how to explain why late seventies and eighties synthesizers sound so atrocious because the Mini Moog's of the late sixties and seventies are a pleasure to my ears. It's also the reason I don't like the Dire Straits of 1980 to 1985.

My favourite Springsteen, the one I kinda saved from his catalogue and which I still enjoy listening to is the 1985 Paris-Courneuve performance of Cadillac Ranch. I like that song for its country rock feel. But it's really Clarence Clemons driving it from start to finish. Though Bruce wrote the song, Big Man owns it, I'd say. And I'm pretty sure that Libs does not like it. :)

Oh well, I did like Springsteen's tribute to Pete Seeger of a few years back, too. "We Shall Overcome, the Pete Seeger Sessions"

Oh and every time I see Nils Lofgren on the stage, I'd like to give him a slap. :p

And I abhor "Streets of Philadelphia" but that has nothing to do with the song, more with the film that I couldn't stand.

what about Mercury Rev, they come out of "The Band" influence
Please explain
 
I've never been much into the alt-rock genre but "The Band" is definitely up there as one of the greatest folk rock acts in history. A great mix of acoustic and electric instrumentation.

Up On Cripple Creek, the sound of the wah wah pedal here with the clavinet b Garth Hudson is phenomenal.

and I'll always have a soft spot for Acadian Driftwood because it reminds me of my trip to Canada and New Brunswick, in particular. The Acadians - the Francophones of New Brunswick - are the most welcoming, sociable and kindest people I've ever seen in my life. And so true to their roots, they know their history. It's been argues that Robertson took liberties with the history of the Grand Dérangement but well a song is not meant to be historically acurate, it's just expressing the thoughts of the people but it remains that the "Grand Dérangement" by the Brits against the Acadian was a disgusting genocide.


Otherwise their cover of Whispering Pines and Rockin' Chair are also nice melodies. :)
 
sienna said:
blackcat said:
Echoes said:
I think LS and I can't be reconciled because I like Americana and I like full band sounds. :p The more melancholic slow-paced songs are beautiful but listening to them all day long would make me even more depressed than I already am.

However I think we may agree that what makes Dancing in the Dark an awful song is this typically eighties keyboard/synthesizer sound but which fortunately did not stand the test of time. He gained huge success with that song at that time but I'm not sure many people are still listening to it today. "Born to Run" is punk rock for me, there's no melody in that, besides you have some awful synthesizer licks. I don't know how to explain why late seventies and eighties synthesizers sound so atrocious because the Mini Moog's of the late sixties and seventies are a pleasure to my ears. It's also the reason I don't like the Dire Straits of 1980 to 1985.

My favourite Springsteen, the one I kinda saved from his catalogue and which I still enjoy listening to is the 1985 Paris-Courneuve performance of Cadillac Ranch. I like that song for its country rock feel. But it's really Clarence Clemons driving it from start to finish. Though Bruce wrote the song, Big Man owns it, I'd say. And I'm pretty sure that Libs does not like it. :)

Oh well, I did like Springsteen's tribute to Pete Seeger of a few years back, too. "We Shall Overcome, the Pete Seeger Sessions"

Oh and every time I see Nils Lofgren on the stage, I'd like to give him a slap. :p

And I abhor "Streets of Philadelphia" but that has nothing to do with the song, more with the film that I couldn't stand.

what about Mercury Rev, they come out of "The Band" influence
Please explain
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztKNzjgshfY
 
Echoes said:
I've never been much into the alt-rock genre but "The Band" is definitely up there as one of the greatest folk rock acts in history. A great mix of acoustic and electric instrumentation.

Up On Cripple Creek, the sound of the wah wah pedal here with the clavinet b Garth Hudson is phenomenal.

and I'll always have a soft spot for Acadian Driftwood because it reminds me of my trip to Canada and New Brunswick, in particular. The Acadians - the Francophones of New Brunswick - are the most welcoming, sociable and kindest people I've ever seen in my life. And so true to their roots, they know their history. It's been argues that Robertson took liberties with the history of the Grand Dérangement but well a song is not meant to be historically acurate, it's just expressing the thoughts of the people but it remains that the "Grand Dérangement" by the Brits against the Acadian was a disgusting genocide.


Otherwise their cover of Whispering Pines and Rockin' Chair are also nice melodies. :)
The harmonies in "Rockin' Chair" give me goose bumps every time I hear it.
The Band were/are one of the few bands that can transport you to another time and place. :D
 
Echoes said:
I'll have to listen to those. I'm following Russian evening lessons and it should train me. Thanks BigMac. :)

That's really cool! :)

I can't understand a single thing but it all sounds so genuine and folkish, so it's an instant like from me. The dancers' one at least.
 
Darkness on the edge of town, though not as stark or intimate as Nebraska, is a standout album. Why? In 1978 springsteen had already got it: the golden age of OECD countries' capitalism was over, and quoting mr warren buffett, the owning class had won; its key social institutions were in crisis, organised labour on the retreat till forever, unemployment the new normal. The BTR world was no more. Sure, the perspective is rather white boy, but nonetheless.

Also I like the songs. Adam raised a cain is hideous, however. Overblown to the max.
 
Oct 23, 2011
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blutto said:
.....R.I.P....Mr. Hicks.....you will be missed....you wonderful wacky genius....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13XklySIWSU

Cheers

...which btw contains one of the greatest solos ever....this courtesy of the great Sid Page....

I have to say, I've never heard of him before, but I've been listening to a few of his songs just now and I never done hear anything like this before, but it sounds amazing! :eek: