Official Doping in Australian Cycling Thread

Jul 16, 2012
201
0
0
Ordway said ASADA was not able by law to provide Cycling Australia with information about White's doping.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/sport/cycling/officials-erred-in-appointing-white-says-exasada-lawyer-20121023-283jh.html#ixzz2AAFpnBtU


I would like to start a thread to keep all the doping in Australian Cycling stuff together. Information and articles regarding Australian cyclists, cycling management, cycling bodies, ASADA etc.. as so much information is coming in as a result of the USADA report, its getting lost in various threads.
 
Jul 16, 2012
201
0
0
Godkin does not believe McQuaid or Dutch honorary president Hein Verbruggen should fall on their swords for cycling's - if not sport's - biggest doping scandal unfolding on their watch.
Neither does Godkin's successor as UCI vice-president and Oceania president, Mike Turtur.
Turtur yesterday said the Armstrong issue had been ''like a kick in the guts'', but added: ''We have to deal with it and make it better for the future for the young athletes and people who follow the sport. Our responsibility now is to make it fair and honest for everyone.''
But asked if the UCI should raise its hand for any accountability, Turtur said: ''Since I have been there [since January, 2009], I can absolutely guarantee that's been the case. The UCI operated in the confinements of the law of the land and the other parameters that were in place and did the best that they could with the testing procedures and everything else that were in place at the day.''


Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/sport/cycling/we-should-have-got-armstrong-earlier-official-20121023-283go.html#ixzz2AAGqjPZM
 
Jul 16, 2012
201
0
0
Doping cyclists taken for a ride

"Steve added that anecdotally, the life expectancy of professional cyclists can be as low as 54.
Drugs are bad, m'kay?
Associate Professor Katherine Samaras is an endocrinologist from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research and she told us about the long lasting effects of a range of drugs commonly used by elite cyclists.
These include experimental anti-cancer medications, steroids and other performance enhancers.
Professor Samaras said the effects of testosterone and steroid use could include shrunken testicles (leading to testicle implants!) heart disease, additional risk of violence and possible depression, all of which could last well beyond the cyclist's professional riding career.
Her prediction was that as the current generation of professional cyclists age, we'll see increased unexpected deaths from a range of causes including sudden heart failure."

http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2012/10/22/3615774.htm
 
Jul 16, 2012
201
0
0
"The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority was granted the power to prosecute athletes on behalf of the sports when it was established in 2006. Since the introduction of ASADA’s enhanced powers, there has been plenty of time for Cycling Australia, and other national sports organisations in Australia, to take a stronger stance against doping in their sports.

What has led to this lack of strong leadership, and abject failure to act in the face of debilitating threats to the integrity of sport? The fear of speaking out may come from people being involved in the sport so long that they have become part of the system. They can’t speak out against a system that supports them. Once you start to enjoy some of the spoils, you are stuck not being able to rail against the lies. You then become part of a corrupt system, and so it perpetuates."

http://www.crikey.com.au/2012/10/23/getting-to-the-truth-of-cyclings-doping-culture/
 
Jul 16, 2012
201
0
0
Good article form Sam Lane - not sure if it was linked to earlier

Culture of Denial

http://www.theage.com.au/sport/cycling/culture-of-denial-20121020-27yko.html

"In the interests of knowing where things stand with his top cycling client in such a volatile environment, Culbert told The Sunday Age he has asked Gerrans squarely in recent days about doping. Gerrans told him he had nothing to fear. Jason Bakker, a former state cricketer turned athlete manager with top Australian cyclists including Cadel Evans on his books, said yesterday he has not felt the need to clear the air. Bakker said, however, that he will encourage all his cyclist clients - Evans, Matt Goss, Jack Bobridge and others - to speak frankly when they return to Australia in coming weeks.
''I haven't had to advise specifically too much on anything at the moment,'' Bakker said. ''I suppose what I do say is that they need to be very clear. I have absolute and utter faith in every guy I manage.''
With cycling's world governing body, the UCI, due to announce its decision on Armstrong tomorrow, Australia's top riders have been largely silent on the scandal occurring around them.
Stuart O'Grady, the 39-year-old veteran who has ridden professionally throughout cycling's worst doping era, said last week he felt ''in as much shock as anybody'' and that doping for him had ''never been a thought, never been an option''. Michael Rogers, one of three Australian riders named in the USADA report that brought down Armstrong, clarified that while he had worked previously with doctor Michele Ferrari, who orchestrated Armstrong's systematic doping program, he has never doped. Yesterday Bobridge, who at 23 has seen White leave the two professional teams he has ridden for due to doping matters, tweeted: ''As the old speak out, the young pay the price. Get rid of them, move on and do what we love, ride bikes!''
If only it were that simple."


Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/sport/cycling/culture-of-denial-20121020-27yko.html#ixzz2AAtYYTpL
 
Jul 16, 2012
201
0
0
CA response to UCI decision on USADA case

Wednesday, 24 October 2012
Cycling Australia has welcomed the confirmation by the International Cycling Union (UCI) that it will not appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport and that it will recognise the sanctions the United States Anti Doping Agency (USADA) has put forward after the investigation into doping practices by Lance Armstrong.

The UCI has stated it will ban Armstrong from cycling and strip him of his seven Tour de France titles. The UCI also recognised the sanctions imposed upon the riders who testified against Armstrong.

In conjunction with the announcement UCI President Pat McQuaid has acknowledged the UCI will also consider what must be done to ensure something like this cannot happen in the future.

The UCI Management Committee will meet this Friday (26 October) and Cycling Australia urges the members of the committee to take the steps necessary to restore confidence in the sport.

Cycling Australia looks forward to working with our fellow national federations and the UCI to ensure appropriate measures are then implemented across the sport.
 
Jun 16, 2009
1,421
0
0
I've spent time training and racing in Australia and was surprised at how freely doping products could be obtained. Testosterone was widely used and horse meds available for things like vit b and iron shots.
 
Aug 25, 2012
51
0
0
bobbins said:
I've spent time training and racing in Australia and was surprised at how freely doping products could be obtained. Testosterone was widely used and horse meds available for things like vit b and iron shots.
Is it luck that few Australian athletes are caught doping? Are the people at ASADA hopeless at their jobs? Maybe they just don't try that hard to catch people. Use Rugby League as an example. Clubs are responsible for testing there own. Who would know who was doping? The clubs certainly won't be throwing there best players under the bus. Eg Shane Webke at the Brisbane Broncos. If anyone thinks that cycling is the worst sport for doping ....well they haven't looked around much. Unfortunately the world has good old cycling to pick on.
In saying that it is sad to see doping run rampant with the governing body being more interested in controlling the story that preventing the story from ever becoming a reality. Who can enjoy their sport!? As for cycling I'll continue to enjoy my Weekend ride despite the drugos and complicit administrators.
 
Jul 16, 2012
201
0
0
Cadel Evans Statement:

"He said the sport had learned from the mistakes of the past and was now at "a level playing field where the hard work, meticulous equipment preparation and natural ability are winning the big beautiful prestigious races.
"For those who are disappointed with the situation right now: do not despair, do not abandon us now we are in our best years, preparing things for our most important moment yet -- the future...," he added.


Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/sport/cycling/evans-urges-to-keep-faith-in-cycling-20121024-285ua.html#ixzz2ACzAvjP4
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,856
0
0
sairyder said:
Cadel Evans Statement:

"He said the sport had learned from the mistakes of the past and was now at "a level playing field where the hard work, meticulous equipment preparation and natural ability are winning the big beautiful prestigious races.
"For those who are disappointed with the situation right now: do not despair, do not abandon us now we are in our best years, preparing things for our most important moment yet -- the future...," he added.


Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/sport/cycling/evans-urges-to-keep-faith-in-cycling-20121024-285ua.html#ixzz2ACzAvjP4
We dont believe Sky are credible Cadel. You let yourself down with these platitudes to the fairy god of clean cycling. JV would be proud of you. Did he script it for you?
 
Jul 16, 2012
201
0
0
ELITE AUSTRALIAN RIDER POSITIVE TEST 2 YEARS AGO

ELEANOR HALL: Now to another development over drugs in cycling.

There is evidence today that an elite Australian cyclist returned a positive drug test two years ago but wasn't told about it for months and continued to race.

The cyclist, who can't be named for legal reasons, appealed a finding against him to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

As revealed on RN Breakfast this morning, the tribunal has now handed down its findings and it's highly critical of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority's handling of the matter

http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2012/s3618358.htm


n China, an Australian cyclist submitted a routine drug test.

Two days later the A sample was analysed, and a small amount of the principal metabolite found in cocaine was detected.

The cyclist should have been told about the positive test within a week but for months he continued to race and even signed on with a new sponsor in early 2011.

The contract included a provision that would see the deal terminated if he breached anti-doping rules.

It wasn't until March 2011 that the international cycling union finally wrote to him.

Despite the delays, the anti-doping rule violation panel found against the cyclist, so he took his case to the Australian Administrative Appeals Tribunal. It has now set aside two initial decisions by the panel, finding:

AUSTRALIAN ADMINISTRATIVE APPEALS TRIBUNAL (voiceover): The long delay in notifying the athlete of his initial test results meant that the UCI was in gross breach of its own Anti-Doping Rules and the World Anti-Doping Code provisions governing results management.
 
Jul 16, 2012
201
0
0
MORE:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-10-25/authorities-panned-over-aussie-cyclist-drug-test/4333616?section=sport


"The cyclist, referred to only as XZTT - and who was registered at elite level with Cycling Australia - competed in a race in China in 2010 under UCI rules and submitted a routine drug test.

Two days later the A sample was analysed and a small amount of the main metabolite found in cocaine was detected.

The cyclist should have been told about the positive test within a week, but for months he continued to race and even signed on with a new sponsor in early 2011.

The contract included a provision that would see the deal terminated if he breached anti-doping rules.

It was not until March 2011 that the UCI wrote to the cyclist. The union also notified Cycling Australia in March.

But nearly a month passed before the cyclist heard anything further, and when he did it was not from Cycling Australia but from the general manager of anti-doping programs and legal services at ASADA.

Despite the delays, the ADRVP found against the cyclist, so he took his case to the AAT.

The tribunal has now set aside two initial decisions made by the ADRVP, finding that: "The long delay in notifying the athlete of his initial test results meant that the UCI was in gross breach of its own anti-doping rules and the WADC provisions governing results management."

"The tribunal has concluded that ASADA and the ADRVP each misconceived their respective legal obligations... in so far as they proceeded on the basis that it was sufficient for the ADRVP to reach conclusions based on a possible finding."

AAT judge Duncan Kerr found the provisions of Australia's national anti-doping scheme had not been properly understood or given effect, but that when the provisions were properly addressed, "a conclusion adverse to XZTT must still be reached".

The tribunal directed the ADRVP to make a single entry in the register of findings relating to the presence of benzoylecgonine.

The terms of the entry shows that the amount of the metabolite detected was not a positive finding for use in-competition.

The ADRVP must now determine what the consequences of the finding are for the cyclist."
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,856
0
0
Phil Anderson was on ABC news last night, and said "finally good to hear it out of the horse's mouth".

some meta irony here.

and phil 'a'course knew, he knew at Motomanmotorola, Lance doped since tri. Phil doped. Sherwen doped before being the PR man at Motorola team. Actually, I dont KNOW on Paul Sherwen, just assume he was like the rest, but Sherwen certainly knew from his cushy refines as their PR officer.

Anyway, so we cant believe Phil. And I dont need him to do a Matt White or Stephen Hodge fall on the sword, martyrdom for puritanicals. dont..... .....need..... .....it


but funny. needs it from the horse's mouth.
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,856
0
0
sairyder said:
ELITE AUSTRALIAN RIDER POSITIVE TEST 2 YEARS AGO

ELEANOR HALL: Now to another development over drugs in cycling.

There is evidence today that an elite Australian cyclist returned a positive drug test two years ago but wasn't told about it for months and continued to race.

The cyclist, who can't be named for legal reasons, appealed a finding against him to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

As revealed on RN Breakfast this morning, the tribunal has now handed down its findings and it's highly critical of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority's handling of the matter

http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2012/s3618358.htm


n China, an Australian cyclist submitted a routine drug test.

Two days later the A sample was analysed, and a small amount of the principal metabolite found in cocaine was detected.

The cyclist should have been told about the positive test within a week but for months he continued to race and even signed on with a new sponsor in early 2011.

The contract included a provision that would see the deal terminated if he breached anti-doping rules.

It wasn't until March 2011 that the international cycling union finally wrote to him.

Despite the delays, the anti-doping rule violation panel found against the cyclist, so he took his case to the Australian Administrative Appeals Tribunal. It has now set aside two initial decisions by the panel, finding:

AUSTRALIAN ADMINISTRATIVE APPEALS TRIBUNAL (voiceover): The long delay in notifying the athlete of his initial test results meant that the UCI was in gross breach of its own Anti-Doping Rules and the World Anti-Doping Code provisions governing results management.
his name, is Tommeke Australia
 
Gerry Ryan revolutionising the sport.

http://www.afr.com/p/national/no_dopes_here_an_australian_sporting_Ym3JB3j12KmjhQoPmBx9DN

No dopes here: an Australian sporting record

Team owner Gerry Ryan has put a heavy emphasis on sports technology. Ryan spends about $400,000 a year on heat chamber training and wind-tunnel testing for the team... "We put a dummy of a rider on our bike in the wind tunnel and test on what the optimum position on the bike should be for the rider."

There has also been a lot of effort expended on rider nutrition. "You look at the sprinters now," says Ryan. "They used to be big and bulky, but not they are a lot leaner. The British have been leaders in this. Our riders have really stripped down this year and you look at someone like Matt Goss, who is a lot leaner. It's about making sure they eat the right things so they still have the same amount of energy to get through five or so hours of riding but won't have the same weight to carry up the mountains."
 
Ferminal said:
Gerry Ryan revolutionising the sport.

http://www.afr.com/p/national/no_dopes_here_an_australian_sporting_Ym3JB3j12KmjhQoPmBx9DN

No dopes here: an Australian sporting record

Team owner Gerry Ryan has put a heavy emphasis on sports technology. Ryan spends about $400,000 a year on heat chamber training and wind-tunnel testing for the team... "We put a dummy of a rider on our bike in the wind tunnel and test on what the optimum position on the bike should be for the rider."

There has also been a lot of effort expended on rider nutrition. "You look at the sprinters now," says Ryan. "They used to be big and bulky, but not they are a lot leaner. The British have been leaders in this. Our riders have really stripped down this year and you look at someone like Matt Goss, who is a lot leaner. It's about making sure they eat the right things so they still have the same amount of energy to get through five or so hours of riding but won't have the same weight to carry up the mountains."
That worked well for him:eek:
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,856
0
0
sairyder said:
Ordway said ASADA was not able by law to provide Cycling Australia with information about White's doping.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/sport/cycling/officials-erred-in-appointing-white-says-exasada-lawyer-20121023-283jh.html#ixzz2AAFpnBtU


I would like to start a thread to keep all the doping in Australian Cycling stuff together. Information and articles regarding Australian cyclists, cycling management, cycling bodies, ASADA etc.. as so much information is coming in as a result of the USADA report, its getting lost in various threads.
this is a bit harsh.

everyone knows the australians are clean. they speak english even.
 
Feb 18, 2013
614
0
0
Dear Wiggo said:
A very old article - Stuey will be singing a different song now that he's been outed.
Yep - was just going on a trip down memory lane and seeing some of the horse lumps that were put out there...
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,856
0
0
Dear Wiggo said:
A very old article - Stuey will be singing a different song now that he's been outed.
but we just need to remind Gerro of that training camp in June 2010 in the Denver ski town of Aspen with Levi and Lance, and a few quotes from "everyone knew" and see Gerro fumble over his words
 
Oct 7, 2009
55
0
0
Wonder if the publication of the Christoph Basson's book will shed any light on the skeletons still in the closet from the 90s and the Festina era. Luckily now we are in the clean era ;)
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY