Rider's determination

May 31, 2011
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I decided to make a topic about the determination of riders when it comes to continue their racing. What pushed me over the edge were reports about Poels' condition. The man was hugging the ditch like he entered some deep coma. I wasn't surprised to hear he abandoned. But then we heard the news he didn't abandon after all to eventually read he did give up. This immediatly raised my eye-brow. It could either be that his number got confused with another, or there would be an edge to these reports. An edge it was. Reports tell us he spent a short time in the ambulance, but then decided to give it another shot. Unfortunately he had to hit his breaks 10km later.

Later news from the hospital told us his condition. Brace yourself: A tear in his kidney and Spleen, bruised lungs and three broken ribs.

Now I'm not a doctor, but I reckon any capable doctor in that ambulance could at least have noticed his broken ribs.

This brings me to the point of my concern. Due to how the mentality among cyclists is, combined with pressure and urges to succeed, I think they often push themselves too far and sincerily endanger themselves. Imagine if a guy with Poels' condition would have continued, but before he could reach the finish he fell again due to whatever reason. It could have been disasterous and possibly life-threatening. I'm afraid that if they continue this way, it's a matter of time till we face a lethal case. Therefore I think both the medics and the cyclists need to change their mentality to a certain extent. It's all nice and heroic that they continue, apart from some exceptions, as long as they manage to keep those wheels turning.

But life, in my opinion, is more important than cycling. And we don't want any cyclist to leave his family behind because he didn't want to abandon a relatively frivolous race.

Medics, please be capable doctors. Take your responsibility, dare to speak about the possible consequences the rider would take when he'd continue. The rider himself should think of his own health and about the people he loves and consider if it's worth taking the risk.

Thank you for reading.
 
Jun 25, 2009
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A big crash happened on the first Friday last year. Wiggins had to retire but my main memories are of Chris Horner being knocked unconscious and then being allowed to continue. At the finish he had no idea what had happened and, despite being told what had happened, still had no idea as he was lead into the ambulance.
 
May 18, 2011
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At first glance I thought this was about Hesjedal. I was wrong but the lad certainly showed some determination today! Plus what you boys said...
 
May 31, 2011
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Frosty said:
A big crash happened on the first Friday last year. Wiggins had to retire but my main memories are of Chris Horner being knocked unconscious and then being allowed to continue. At the finish he had no idea what had happened and, despite being told what had happened, still had no idea as he was lead into the ambulance.
That's exactly what I mean. If he had no clue like you described and he would have had to descent. The possibility of nót missing a corner would be too slim.

It reminds me of a blog I read some time ago, I believe it was on CN. I believe it was about a british cyclist who rode somewhere in, I believe, Asia. He described how someone fell terribly in the sprint and how the medics there didn't have a clue what they were doing. There was foam coming out of the crased rider's mouth and he was moving like someone who had a heart-attack. The medic was a rooky who took his time and didn't even have proper equipment with him. They put the rider on his bike and literally pushed him over the finish.. The true wonder was: he was at the start of the next stage.
 
May 31, 2011
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jamiephillips said:
At first glance I thought this was about Hesjedal. I was wrong but the lad certainly showed some determination today! Plus what you boys said...
Ah yea sorry, misleading title. Though I certainly agree with you. One of many riders, today.
 
Panda Claws said:
It could be a good idea too make sure that cyclists are not too badly hurt before letting them continue.

If you keep in mind what insane pain tolerance these guys have.
Agreed. It is their job to suffer. Even more than in other sports, the roles of 8 out of 9 guys on a team is to push themselves to the limit, before the game is even over. You certainly can't fault a rider for confusing the familiar physical suffering, with the abnormal damage suffering (not that anyone is).

So, we get to the doctors. Given how often they see guys who are in this suffering state, it has to be tremendously hard to differentiate a damaged rider from a suffering (fitness wise) rider. It certainly doesn't help when the riders probably all give the same response to the doctor (I can go on), when most of the time they can. Then the one in a hundred (making up a number) case comes...

I can only hope that doctors are accurate and precise when advising riders, but especially as an athlete, I would hate to see doctor's activism block anyone from going on if they can.
 
May 19, 2011
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As reported in a team press release, Poels has officially abandoned after being diagnosed at the hospital with a rupture to the spleen and kidney, along with bruised lungs and three broken ribs. After the crash, Poels was loaded into an ambulance a first time, before deciding to get back on his bike. Ten kilometres later, he abandoned for good.

Read more: http://www.velonation.com/News/ID/12314/Argos-Shimano-a-more-flexible-Tour-de-France-jury-would-help.aspx#ixzz1ztF0nUxu


Poels is crazy, rupture spleen can kill you very quickly, he even rode 10KM. OMG!!!:eek:
 
May 19, 2011
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jamiephillips said:
At first glance I thought this was about Hesjedal. I was wrong but the lad certainly showed some determination today! Plus what you boys said...
Hesjedal is not in any better condition, in the end Farar literally pushed him across the finish line
 
May 19, 2011
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While time loss is likely the worst to come of it for Rabobank’s three leaders, domestique Martin Wynants has been forced to withdraw. Wynants came down in a smaller crash after 35 kilometres, but finished the stage reporting pain in his chest and difficulty breathing. Upon reaching the hospital, he was diagnosed with two broken ribs and a punctured lung.

Read more: http://www.velonation.com/News/ID/12316/Rabobank-trying-to-salvage-their-Tour-de-France-after-stage-six-catastrophe.aspx#ixzz1ztTDghwZ

WOW dutch riders are tough, riding 35km with broken ribs
 
maxmartin said:
While time loss is likely the worst to come of it for Rabobank’s three leaders, domestique Martin Wynants has been forced to withdraw. Wynants came down in a smaller crash after 35 kilometres, but finished the stage reporting pain in his chest and difficulty breathing. Upon reaching the hospital, he was diagnosed with two broken ribs and a punctured lung.

Read more: http://www.velonation.com/News/ID/12316/Rabobank-trying-to-salvage-their-Tour-de-France-after-stage-six-catastrophe.aspx#ixzz1ztTDghwZ

WOW dutch riders are tough, riding 35km with broken ribs
If he injured himself in the crash at 35km, he rode 170km+ with his broken ribs and punctured lung!
 
May 19, 2011
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One Eyed Aussie said:
If he injured himself in the crash at 35km, he rode 170km+ with his broken ribs and punctured lung!
thanks for correcting, this just blows my mind
 
More Strides than Rides said:
I can only hope that doctors are accurate and precise when advising riders, but especially as an athlete, I would hate to see doctor's activism block anyone from going on if they can.
Of course, it will always be a fine line, but if a rider will lose a bunch of time regardless I am certainly in favor of a more extensive medical research before allowing him to continue. (Research probably is not the right here, but I hope you get it.)
 
Apr 11, 2009
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This whole sport is becoming pretty ridiculous. There's no justification for injuries like this. In future, I refuse to watch the the first week of the Tour.

Riders are too ambitious, there's too much stress on winning by everybody, and this business about everybody having to be at the front is causing it. Just like someone yelling fire in a cinema when there is no fire, and knowing that there's one exit. It's self-induced carnage where the the incentives as a whole in the peloton are "peverse" (producing the problems).

Danielson is in "pretty good" shape compared to some of the really seriously injured and yet he looks like this, a soldier off a World War I battlefield, complete with a battlefield helmet and muddied face. These guys are in far worse shape than the nut jobs competing in Ultimate Fighting. This situation with the Tour is ridiculous. The people and teams and institutions in this sport increasingly look lilke nut jobs. Sorry to say this.

As Voigt says in his blog, folks are crashing in the neutral zone, the feed zone, and straight roads. Something's wrong here.

http://bicycling.com/blogs/hardlyserious/2012/07/06/stop-the-insanity/



We then get this pretentious statement by Slipstream:

Jonathan Vaughters, CEO, Director Sportif

"Clearly, this will mean a change in strategy for the team."

[Yeah, right, onwards and upwards to bigger and better things in the pursuit of glory on two wheels. These folks are like a bunch of friggin rotating doorknobs.]

"We’ll be looking for stage wins, possibly the KOM jersey and ways to animate the race. It was a tough day but all things considered, spirits are good. These guys are good friends and a good support system for each other, they know how to be a team and that makes me immensely proud. Zabriskie had a great ride today, and I’m proud of how all the guys rode. Just crossing the line after a day like this speaks volumes. Tomorrow is going to be painful for many of them, so starting alone will be a big step but this is the Tour de France, and we go onward and set new goals. There's a lot of racing still to be done."

Sorry to say this, but the folks in this "industry" are not quite connected with reality.
 
Sep 30, 2009
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Azabael said:
But life, in my opinion, is more important than cycling. And we don't want any cyclist to leave his family behind because he didn't want to abandon a relatively frivolous race.
This is exactly the opposite thinking of many elite athletes. To them cycling is life, without it they are nothing. Il Pirata was just one example. The TdF is the pinnacle for most, certainly not frivolous. So it's not surprising that they'll push themselves beyond what is healthy to continue despite injuries that would have the rest of us take to our sick beds.
 
May 31, 2011
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Nice post, Parrot23. And I frankly agree with you.

For some reason I wonder what will happen to the two kids on the picture. How will that happening of events effect their supporter ship or maybe even their lifes. If riders massively say it was a carnage and the closest they will ever come to a battle field, it's bound to have an impact on a 12-year-old who came to see his heroes, right?
 
Mar 10, 2009
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will10 said:
C'est le Tour.
Exactly! Some of you don't realize how big this race is for the riders/teams, doing well in this race equates to a career/sponsorship boost of epic proportions. Any other race and they play it safe. At le Tour they lay it on the line as you are seeing.

This is the top race of the season.
 

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