Running-thread

Doesn't seem like we have a running-thread which is quite odd. Well, I'd understand since I really don't like running.

But, I still signed up for a marathon 2 weeks ago and ran it today. Having never run more than 12 kilometres at once, this kind of a big challenge. Don't get me wrong, it would obviously be very hard, but it seemed i underestimated it quite a lot. I was under the assumption that I was en very good shape (despite not really running) and just needed to pace myself well. After all, I could run 4:40/km on 12 kilometres and 4:00/km on 5! I know, not very impressive, but better than I've run for many years.

My goal initially was 4 hours, but that was quickly out the window. I could feel it right from the start, my heartrate would be rather high, but I'd still continue to run a pace much higher than 5:40 (that should have been 6:00, really) that I had planned in order to finish in 4 hours. I guess the clapping and the emotion got the better of me. Meanwhile, I was thinking to myself (you think ALOT during a marathon) that I was no Skybot and ran on instinct rather than on watts and km/minute. What a fool I was. Always be a Skybot in that situation and never Contador. It has to be boring the first 10 kilometres, the pace slow, but yeah. You got do get that experience firsthand, it doesn't matter if you read it on the internet or your running mates tell you.

So I completely bonked after 25 km, we are talking about Landis on La Touissuire and Ullrich on Galibier-levels combined. The only difference being Ullrich actually raced the best climber ever while I raced old men and women who beat be comfortably. Went from 6 min/km to 8 min/km and was close to retiring multiple times, but somehow pulled through.. honestly, I don't know why I continued, but it feels great. Apart from the pain when Im going to the toilet or want to make me food. I have the feeling I'll never be the same again.

Anyways, it confirmed that a) you actually need to train for a marathon and b) i like my bike better. Not really surprising conclusions, but what an experience. You can find the run on Strava, Andreas Riis. Running time is 4:40, but I completely in exactly 5:00 due to long breaks in the end.
 
Feb 23, 2014
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I had seen that you were running a little on your strava (I follow you.) Then boom a marathon distance. Dude I could have told you that you were over ambitious. :p. That said, you still did decent for little training. Nothing to be ashamed of considering.

I've done very little running. Riding a bike definitely helps, but not completely. I find my joints and shins really need to get used to the pounding of the pavement. My heart adapts quicker....definitely prefer the bike though.
 
Brave/foolhardy/laudable attempt, Piti! Chapeau :D

I have run more than ridden for a year now, and I Kinda like the transition! It's a lot less time consuming to train this way I guess. And it is more practical to travel on the job with the shoes than a bike. Also there are a lot more races or events for us weekend warriors to attend at least here in Finland. But yes, the legs and the feet need to adapt to the impact quite a bit. Finding a balanced gait can also take time. And I definitely would say the transition is easier from running to cycling than the other way round.

Guess I will be doing long moderate pace rides in the summer but mainly run until then.

Set a goal of a sub 38min 10k and a 1:25h half marathon for this season to challenge myself. We'll see in the autumn. Just putting in the slow easy kms at the moment (6-6.45 pace range) and doing long intervals once a week or so. Which, come to think of it, is pretty much the same menu I did on the bike as well.
 
Mar 23, 2017
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Maybe that was the only way he could will himself into a goal that was running related? Either way I respect it.

I'm more of a sprinter myself, but long distance running isn't for me. Maybe it's a body training thing that I never really enjoyed, but I can't run for longer than a few miles at most.
 
Dec 7, 2010
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I missed this thread somehow. It was during the time that I had to deal with health issues and some other stuff, probably I was sidetracked with the politics thread.

Anyhow @ valv.piti you must be young, otherwise running that marathon without any true distance training could have turned into about a 5 hour affair! :D

I have run 37 full marathon's in my lifetime. The last one was in 2004. It was that day that I decided my competitive running days were over. I probably should have re-THUNK it but have not raced since.

But I have had the itch since I was awakened by this latest health scare. I plan to run a marathon in 2018 but have not decided which one all depends on my base training for the summer. If things go well I will actually register for and run another marathon.

Way to go valv.piti!

To all who run and all who don't --be safe and stay frosty.
 
Re:

BaylorBelef said:
Maybe that was the only way he could will himself into a goal that was running related? Either way I respect it.

I'm more of a sprinter myself, but long distance running isn't for me. Maybe it's a body training thing that I never really enjoyed, but I can't run for longer than a few miles at most.
I loved sprinting when I was young and could still compete with (and even beat) the boys, but once poooberty hit I lost all speed and had to switch to distance. Losing speed was frustrating, but if you love running enough you'll make that big switch. (And with any luck... if you still have any gas left the last few hundred meters of a distance race you kick it, just to prove to yourself that once upon a time you were sprinter.)

Not sure if you were brave or stupid to tackle a marathon without any training, Valv.Piti., but kudos for having finished it.
 
Running was my thing for a while, mainly trail running but I did the London Marathon in '08. Unfortunately I tore my calf 3 months before it so didn't get to finish my training. A friend and I had aimed for 3:30, we were on for close to 3 at the half way stage but his back went around mile 18 and my calf went at around 21. Limped home in 4:16. Not really done much running since, I get to see more when I cycle, but I have thought about dusting off my trail shoes and hitting the West Highland Way for a few miles to see how it feels.
 
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King Boonen said:
A friend and I had aimed for 3:30, we were on for close to 3 at the half way stage but his back went around mile 18 and my calf went at around 21. Limped home in 4:16.
Don't mean to laugh, but I just have this funny image of a couple of 100yr. old guys who are in some kind of a super Masters class - come hell or high we're gonna finish this, old boy. We're gonna finish!
 
I ran in junior high and high school--also did a lot of trail running prior to that. I managed 13th for the 3 mile in state sophomore year, but then shifted focus completely to cycling. Like Valv I did some untrained marathons and runs such as Bay to Breakers after that as a lark, but generally let running go unless stuck somewhere without a bike.

Two years ago, I was beginning to train up for qualifying in the NY marathon until a tourist ran me over. This year is likely still mostly cycling, but I expect by fall I'll resume that training.
 
Why it all got to be about the marathon with you all and all? Why not just do a half-marathon, or even a 10k properly?

I would consider the 10k, or even 5k, distance. (800m I would consider middle-distance, and that is where the real pain comes in. Cause you gotta know how to sprint and be a distance runner at the same time. So that's why I never did it.)
 
Re: Re:

Tricycle Rider said:
King Boonen said:
A friend and I had aimed for 3:30, we were on for close to 3 at the half way stage but his back went around mile 18 and my calf went at around 21. Limped home in 4:16.
Don't mean to laugh, but I just have this funny image of a couple of 100yr. old guys who are in some kind of a super Masters class - come hell or high we're gonna finish this, old boy. We're gonna finish!
Pretty much bang on the money! :D

Or both looking like Simon Pegg at the end in Run Fatboy Run.
 
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Tricycle Rider said:
Why it all got to be about the marathon with you all and all? Why not just do a half-marathon, or even a 10k properly?

I would consider the 10k, or even 5k, distance. (800m I would consider middle-distance, and that is where the real pain comes in. Cause you gotta know how to sprint and be a distance runner at the same time. So that's why I never did it.)
Did lots of 800s. Tricky, but boring. 10ks are training. Distance running goes somewhere. My feelings of the activity.
 
Re:

King Boonen said:
Running was my thing for a while, mainly trail running but I did the London Marathon in '08. Unfortunately I tore my calf 3 months before it so didn't get to finish my training. A friend and I had aimed for 3:30, we were on for close to 3 at the half way stage but his back went around mile 18 and my calf went at around 21. Limped home in 4:16. Not really done much running since, I get to see more when I cycle, but I have thought about dusting off my trail shoes and hitting the West Highland Way for a few miles to see how it feels.
Funny story... I did the london marathon in '08. Was on track for a proper result til 2 weeks before when it all went t*ts up. My final two weeks training consisted of one 5km run 2 day before the marathon. So, plan was shot, and just decided to enjoy a 'casual' run on the course taking it the atmosphere of the event. Result... 4.16


To tricycle rider - I much preferred half marathons and have done loads. Haven't run one for a few years, nor done one for myself for a while - mostly just pacing and encouraging others who're giving them a go...
 
Dec 7, 2010
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Re:

Tricycle Rider said:
Why it all got to be about the marathon with you all and all? Why not just do a half-marathon, or even a 10k properly?

I would consider the 10k, or even 5k, distance. (800m I would consider middle-distance, and that is where the real pain comes in. Cause you gotta know how to sprint and be a distance runner at the same time. So that's why I never did it.)
I've done all distances from 1600 / 1mile up to the marathon. Somehow I like the marathon because it got rid of some of the posers. Everyone is different. I ran competitively for about 15 years.
My PR's for different distances reflect that I did not like anything shorter than a 10k. But I still done them due to the nature of distance training.

I know a good deal of people who are convinced that the half marathon is the best distance.
 
I ran my home city marathon as a freshman in college when I was too stupid to know any better. I did qualify for Boston but I didn't have the money to even think about running in it. Half marathons are the best distance. They are arduous enough to feel like you accomplished something, but not so tough that it feels like you were hit by a truck the next day like a full marathon. Plus, I've found that I don't need to take any food or water during them. Just settle into the pace and enjoy the run. As a converted middle distance runner, it was mentally harder for me to pace myself in the full marathon. I quit running organized events a few years ago as my collection of race shirts was getting excessive. I might start training more for running when I hit the masters category in 18 months.
 
Dec 7, 2010
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USTF says that Masters are age 35, I was always told once you hit 40 things change fast, lack of speed etc. I actually noticed a change in speed for the 5k at age 30 or a little after. But my pace was more consistent after 30 and really after 35.

djpb you really should have done Boston. I can understand the money issue, Boston is one of those special marathons. My first Boston was in 1987 and my last was 1999. I qualified every year after that until 2004 but for selfish reasons did not go.

All this talk about the marathon is addictive. hehe

New York is also another really good marathon but my experiences are not the same as some of my friends. If you don't get a starting position I hear that it can be brutal.
 
I set my 5k and 10k PRs when I was in my early 30s. My speed is long gone, but I can grind out hard tempo for a lot longer. I know a lot of people who rave about Boston too. But, I have no regrets on that count. I have run a number of the Rock N Roll 1/2's and I far prefer the medium size races where you can find breathing room. If I would run one of the big ones, I think I would prefer Chicago to Boston or NYC. But at the end of the day, I may have run a marathon, but I am not a marathoner. I never got addicted!
 
Dec 7, 2010
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Sad to say that all my PR's were set when I was 20 to 24.
(5k 14:32) (10k 30:46) cant remember my half. full Marathon 2:28:53---- Unless I cheat like some of Iron Man folks I have read about then my PR's are done and dusted.

Boston just like all other Marathons has its pro's and con's.

Chicago I hear from previous training partners that it is good.

What used to be many mid sized races that offered multiple distances in the same race are all much to large now. Austin for example was a very good small to mid sized event now it is a monster. Same goes for Houston.
Mardi Gras marathon used to be one of my favorites until the Rock and Roll crap came along. They ruined it for me. It is a business now I get it. AnyWho rant is over.

It is addictive, just depends on how much you let it get ya.
 
Re: Re:

Archibald said:
King Boonen said:
Running was my thing for a while, mainly trail running but I did the London Marathon in '08. Unfortunately I tore my calf 3 months before it so didn't get to finish my training. A friend and I had aimed for 3:30, we were on for close to 3 at the half way stage but his back went around mile 18 and my calf went at around 21. Limped home in 4:16. Not really done much running since, I get to see more when I cycle, but I have thought about dusting off my trail shoes and hitting the West Highland Way for a few miles to see how it feels.
Funny story... I did the london marathon in '08. Was on track for a proper result til 2 weeks before when it all went t*ts up. My final two weeks training consisted of one 5km run 2 day before the marathon. So, plan was shot, and just decided to enjoy a 'casual' run on the course taking it the atmosphere of the event. Result... 4.16


To tricycle rider - I much preferred half marathons and have done loads. Haven't run one for a few years, nor done one for myself for a while - mostly just pacing and encouraging others who're giving them a go...
Small world!

Tricycle Rider, I like to get out and see as much as I can, that's why I always did long distances/trail running etc. It's also why I now ride bikes much more instead.
 
Running certainly can be addictive, I always loved the runner's high. (I think there's been some questions lately as to whether such a thing exists, or why it does, but I'm pretty sure whatever it is I've felt it.)

To King Boonen - saw this vid of the Philadelphia Love Run just now, it made me think of you and your friend. (Not sure which one of you was carrying the other across the finish line. :lol: ) While I do think this kind of desire to finish is slightly perturbing I do understand it.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-39414640
 

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