SI.com on A Rod-Familiar? MLB Facing Reality in Lance's wake

Jun 19, 2009
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I'm technologically ungifted but today's SI.com has a lengthy feature on one of MLB's biggest stars detailing drug use, procurement, etc. Alot of questions come from this:
a)How will MBL handle it and other implicated players?
b)Will USADA get involved?
c)Is this a possible Yankee contract exit strategy-disclose and fire A Rod?
d)Lance's woes-did his fall from grace precipitate the Press interest in truth?
 
Sep 22, 2012
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Isn't A-Rod Andy Roddick the tennis player?

Would not surprise me if he doped.

EDIT: What does MLB stand for? I never heard of it in relation to tennis.
 
Jan 30, 2011
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Mad Elephant Man said:
Isn't A-Rod Andy Roddick the tennis player?

Would not surprise me if he doped.

EDIT: What does MLB stand for? I never heard of it in relation to tennis.
I'm sure you are just going for clarity rather than not knowing at all, so for the sake of clarity:

http://newyork.yankees.mlb.com/team/player.jsp?player_id=121347#gameType='R'&sectionType=career&statType=1&season=2012&level='ALL'

And just in case a question about SI comes as well:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/mlb/news/20130204/alex-rodriguez-ped-regiment-anthony-bosch-miami-new-times/?sct=hp_t11_a5&eref=sihp
 
Sep 22, 2012
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peterst6906 said:
So it is a different A-Rod and baseball being talked about. I do not follow American Sports like baseball, basketball, ice hockey, their football. Being from Adelaide in Australia I grew up on Aussie Rules Football and Cricket although I do not follow Aussie Rules Football at all now and cricket not as much as I used to. I am now more into cycling (although rather frustrated about it at the moment hence my other no dead thread) and soccer type football in the A-league. That is not going to well either right now.
So no, I had no idea what MLB stood for or who this A-Rod is. I actually do not care either now I know what it is about. So I am out of this thread for good, leave it to those who know something and care about it.

Sorry to everyone for the ignorant intrusion.

Dr. Horrible the Mad Elephant Man
 
Mar 13, 2009
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Mad Elephant Man said:
So it is a different A-Rod and baseball being talked about. I do not follow American Sports like baseball, basketball, ice hockey, their football. Being from Adelaide in Australia I grew up on Aussie Rules Football and Cricket although I do not follow Aussie Rules Football at all now and cricket not as much as I used to. I am now more into cycling (although rather frustrated about it at the moment hence my other no dead thread) and soccer type football in the A-league. That is not going to well either right now.
So no, I had no idea what MLB stood for or who this A-Rod is. I actually do not care either now I know what it is about. So I am out of this thread for good, leave it to those who know something and care about it.

Sorry to everyone for the ignorant intrusion.

Dr. Horrible the Mad Elephant Man
N American pro team-sport primer for MEM
MLB Major League Baseball two leagues, American League and National League
NBA National Basketball Association
NFL National Football League
NHL National Hockey League (includes the canucks too)
 
blackcat said:
N American pro team-sport primer for MEM
MLB Major League Baseball two leagues, American League and National League
NBA National Basketball Association
NFL National Football League
NHL National Hockey League (includes the canucks too)
Perhaps it's time to create a forum glossary. . . Although that would probably just start more arguments about what should/shouldn't be in there.
 
Sep 22, 2012
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blackcat said:
N American pro team-sport primer for MEM
MLB Major League Baseball two leagues, American League and National League
NBA National Basketball Association
NFL National Football League
NHL National Hockey League (includes the canucks too)
Thank you. I would have definitely recognised NBA and probably NFL and NHL, MLB just escaped me. Sorry again for error.
 
Oldman said:
I'm technologically ungifted but today's SI.com has a lengthy feature on one of MLB's biggest stars detailing drug use, procurement, etc. Alot of questions come from this:
a)How will MBL handle it and other implicated players?
b)Will USADA get involved?
c)Is this a possible Yankee contract exit strategy-disclose and fire A Rod?
d)Lance's woes-did his fall from grace precipitate the Press interest in truth?
We do have a thread on doping in baseball, but to answer your questions:

1) Since A-Rod is denying everything, MLB will probably need more details in order to hand down suspensions, which will only be 50 games, less than 1/3 of a season, for a first offense. A-Rod will miss the first several months of the coming season because of an injury, anyway. It's not clear to me whether he would be allowed to serve a suspension then.

2) I don't think USADA will get involved, since MLB doesn't run MLB's anti-doping program, and there is no evidence I know of that Tony Bosch, the man in the center of this scandal, worked with athletes in sports that use USADA (though it’s possible). OTOH, MLB has worked with USADA through an organization known as the Partnership for Clean Competition, so it's possible it could ask for USADA's help.

3) The Yankees would probably love to dump A-Rod even without the doping scandal, because even when he’s healthy (and he will miss about half of the coming season rehabbing) his production is way down from his peak. His performance was downright embarrassing in the playoffs last year. Unfortunately, they almost certainly cannot terminate his contract, and A-Rod, in his most recent statement, said he doesn’t want to leave the team or have his contract be bought out. So the Yankees are probably stuck with paying him about $114 million over the next 5 years (he will be paid about as much during the part of the season he misses next year as USADA's annual budget). Someone on another thread pointed out that the top Euro football players make far more than Contador, and so doping in football has more serious financial implications than doping in cycling. Can say the same in baseball.

4) I don’t think this story was the result of LA’s problems. The press—a newspaper in Miami no one outside of that area I think had even heard of until now—was researching this case well before the USADA charging letter.

However, there is an interesting parallel to LA's case. In 2009, A-Rod admitted doping back in 2003, in response to a leak of tests which could not be used for sanctioning, but were carried out to estimate the extent of doping in baseball. Sort of equivalent to the 1999 EPO samples. At that time (2009), A-Rod swore he was clean, and hadn't doped since, and never would. Sort of equivalent to LA's, I was clean during my comeback. Had this new evidence not emerged, he might have rehabilitated his image considerably.

Beyond the usual interest for the Clinic, the A-Rod case is significant because he has a shot at breaking the all-time career HR record, currently held by another highly publicized doper, Barry Bonds.
 
Jun 19, 2009
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Merckx index said:
We do have a thread on doping in baseball, but to answer your questions:

1) Since A-Rod is denying everything, MLB will probably need more details in order to hand down suspensions, which will only be 50 games, less than 1/3 of a season, for a first offense. A-Rod will miss the first several months of the coming season because of an injury, anyway. It's not clear to me whether he would be allowed to serve a suspension then.

2) I don't think USADA will get involved, since MLB doesn't run MLB's anti-doping program, and there is no evidence I know of that Tony Bosch, the man in the center of this scandal, worked with athletes in sports that use USADA (though it’s possible). OTOH, MLB has worked with USADA through an organization known as the Partnership for Clean Competition, so it's possible it could ask for USADA's help.

3) The Yankees would probably love to dump A-Rod even without the doping scandal, because even when he’s healthy (and he will miss about half of the coming season rehabbing) his production is way down from his peak. His performance was downright embarrassing in the playoffs last year. Unfortunately, they almost certainly cannot terminate his contract, and A-Rod, in his most recent statement, said he doesn’t want to leave the team or have his contract be bought out. So the Yankees are probably stuck with paying him about $114 million over the next 5 years (he will be paid about as much during the part of the season he misses next year as USADA's annual budget). Someone on another thread pointed out that the top Euro football players make far more than Contador, and so doping in football has more serious financial implications than doping in cycling. Can say the same in baseball.

4) I don’t think this story was the result of LA’s problems. The press—a newspaper in Miami no one outside of that area I think had even heard of until now—was researching this case well before the USADA charging letter.

However, there is an interesting parallel to LA's case. In 2009, A-Rod admitted doping back in 2003, in response to a leak of tests which could not be used for sanctioning, but were carried out to estimate the extent of doping in baseball. Sort of equivalent to the 1999 EPO samples. At that time (2009), A-Rod swore he was clean, and hadn't doped since, and never would. Sort of equivalent to LA's, I was clean during my comeback. Had this new evidence not emerged, he might have rehabilitated his image considerably.

Beyond the usual interest for the Clinic, the A-Rod case is significant because he has a shot at breaking the all-time career HR record, currently held by another highly publicized doper, Barry Bonds.
We have a winner so far. It goes to what will hurt them the most-endorsement income. That and A Rod could be the greatest homerun hitter of the doper era!
 
This is getting really interesting now. Ryan Braun, the NL's MVP in 2011 who tested positive for testosterone near the end of that season (and got off on a technicality), is also named in the documents, along with the lawyer who helped him get off at that time. Unlike A-Rod and most of the others, his name is not associated with any PEDs, but there is an indication he paid the organization $20-30,000:

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/ryan-braun-s-name-listed-in-biogenesis-clinic-records-235650670.html

So far, every player named in the documents has denied any involvement with Bosch. However, three of the players named in the documents tested positive last season and served suspensions. With A-Rod and Braun, at least five of the named players have a known prior history of doping. The case against all of them named will hinge on whether the Miami Times hands over the documents it has to MLB investigators. It hasn't done so yet, but is considering doing so.

One of the juiciest revelations to date is a letter from Bosch to Juan Nunez, an agent for Melky Cabrera. Cabrera is one of the named players who tested positive and was suspended last season. Before he tested positive, he was MVP in the All Star game. The letter congratulates Nunez on the MVP award, and adds, "This smells like the Braun advantage". LMAO.

This could be MLB's Puerto.

By the way, apparently if A-Rod does get a suspension, he can serve it while he's on the disabled list. So he wouldn't miss any playing time he wasn't going to miss, anyway, though presumably he would lose his salary during that period.
 

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