The diminutive Bjorg Lambrecht thread *** R.I.P.***

1m68 and 56 kg
Just turned 22 earlier this month - Born April 2nd 1997

One of the most talented riders from the impressive Bernal, Sivakov, Mäder... generation.
Second in L'Avenir, 1 minute behind Bernal in 2017. Winning both the Course de la Paix U23 and L'Isard in 2016.
Silver medalist U23 in Innsbruck 2018. First pro victory last year in an uphill finish, outsprinting Albasini and Boasson Hagen in the 3rd stage of Tour des Fjords 2018.

Already showing some decent efforts in some 1 week stage races (Tour de Suisse 2018, almost outsprinting Alaphilippe in Itzulia earlier this month). And a few signs of class at Vuelta 2018. And now 5th in Brabantse Pijl, 6th at Amstel Gold Race and 4th in Flèche Wallonne.

He'll focus more on short stage races and one day races for now (as he said in an interview this week), and wait for GT GC for the next few years.

He hasn't won a big race so far, but it's becoming increasingly obvious that this kid is going to be a force to be reconned with the coming years. If not for GC's, then surely for hilly stages or one day races. He's got a lot of punch, and riding the finals of Amstel and Flèche Wallonne (in a very small bunch, which he helped reduce at 30K from the finish) shows that he has the engine to go with it.

Very exciting rider imho.
 
Re:

SafeBet said:
I love him, he's got panache and is not afraid to attack.

Not sure he has the recovery to really be a factor in stage races. But he's still very young, so who knows?
I think that's the reason why he's focussing on shorter stage races and one day races for the time being. Though, i didn't expect before the season started, that he would already be riding the finals of BP, AGR and FW with top 10's in all of them. So he obviously has a bigger engine than his tiny skinny build would have you believe at first glance. Especially given his age.

Whether he'll ever be a GT contender, who knows. He isn't the best ITT'er anyway, so that's one thing to consider anyway. I think for the time being, he's making the best decision. Focus on short stage races and stage hunting, as well as one day races.
 
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SafeBet said:
I love him, he's got panache and is not afraid to attack.

Not sure he has the recovery to really be a factor in stage races. But he's still very young, so who knows?
He was super consistent in stage races in the u23 category. Obviously pro races are different, but the reason why he had a bad day in Itzulia was because of recurring back problems. I'm just hoping that isnt gonna be a factor in the future.
 
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He's shaping up to become the Belgian Purito. Love the guy, he seems down to earth and has a big engine for such a diminutive figure. Definitely keeping an eye on him in LBL and the coming seasons. He's quietly having an amazing season. Being around the top 5 in some of the biggest spring races and in this field, is awesome. Still only 22 could mean that as soon as next year he might be ready to challenge for the win. Very exciting rider. According to Jurgen van den Broeck Lambrecht lost a podium spot today because of his attack at 30k to go. Shame.
 
His comments after today:

"I didn't like the way the bunch was getting so nervous, and it was really windy, so I opted to give it a try," he explained. "So I attacked to stay safe and save energy."

This makes Logic's temper tantrum against his team quite funny...
 
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tobydawq said:
His comments after today:

"I didn't like the way the bunch was getting so nervous, and it was really windy, so I opted to give it a try," he explained. "So I attacked to stay safe and save energy."

This makes Logic's temper tantrum against his team quite funny...
I don't think that's funny at all. But whatever floats your boat. Lotto has been known for literally decades to be tactically clueless. They should have literally told him not to go. He was their ace in the hole, unless you actually believe Wellens was ever going to compete here (especially on his hardly earthshattering form). He was their only rider that could really wait it out, and they let him attack. And at the top of the Mur, he is still at the front of the break, trying to set the pace. It's your duty as a DS, to tell your inexperienced rider, not to do that.

But i'm glad you think the team screwing up and him losing an all but guaranteed podium is funny.

It's basically the same ineptitude as Jumbo Visma in PR, who didn't order a few of their domestiques to wait for Van Aert, because he told them not to wait at Wallers. Not only should they have known better, he also had to start his chase over after his crash, and still they didn't wait for him, leaving him to chase for 25km. In conclusion, it's not because an inexperienced rider makes a stupid decision, that the team isn't at fault.
 
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Logic-is-your-friend said:
tobydawq said:
His comments after today:

"I didn't like the way the bunch was getting so nervous, and it was really windy, so I opted to give it a try," he explained. "So I attacked to stay safe and save energy."

This makes Logic's temper tantrum against his team quite funny...
I don't think that's funny at all. But whatever floats your boat. Lotto has been known for literally decades to be tactically clueless. They should have literally told him not to go. He was their ace in the hole, unless you actually believe Wellens was ever going to compete here (especially on his hardly earthshattering form). He was their only rider that could really wait it out, and they let him attack. And at the top of the Mur, he is still at the front of the break, trying to set the pace. It's your duty as a DS, to tell your inexperienced rider, not to do that.

But i'm glad you think the team screwing up and him losing an all but guaranteed podium is funny.

It's basically the same ineptitude as Jumbo Visma in PR, who didn't order a few of their domestiques to wait for Van Aert, because he told them not to wait at Wallers. Not only should they have known better, he also had to start his chase over after his crash, and still they didn't wait for him, leaving him to chase for 25km. In conclusion, it's not because an inexperienced rider makes a stupid decision, that the team isn't at fault.
I think you underestimate how taxing the fight for position can be. You have to do a lot of small, invisible (to the viewers) explosive efforts all the time, which is what he is referring to.

It's true that it's probably not easier to drive the pace in the front group but he didn't lead it all the time as you very well know.

You could also look at the whole attack a little differently, and instead of dismissing it as foolishness you could argue that it was actually a pretty good try for the victory. He was never going to beat Alaphilippe from the peloton, and the break was so strong that it required a very concerted effort from Movistar to close it (Deceuninck were represented enough in front to play the waiting game), and I think he was the favourite to win in the unlikely event that the break would succeed. If anything, Wellens should have sacrificed himself, making it harder to catch the break.

And how could they possibly have known that they threw away a guaranteed podium shot? He might have obtained third if he had just sat in (but as I said, you don't save that much energy by sitting in in this race) but there was no way of knowing that before the finish.
 
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RedheadDane said:
Wasn't it you who defended Evenepoel's aggressive - but tactically unsmart - attacking in Turkey? Saying he was simply testing his legs.
Yup. That was me. Evenepoel is a 19 year old, who had only raced 1.5 years as a junior, who had no competition among his peers at all, did not ride as a U23 at all, and has no point of reference coming into the pros. A rider who is targetting 3 week GT GC in the long run. If you can't see the difference, between him and a guy like Lambrecht, who has been racing since he was a kid, who was a succesfull junior, a succesful U23, raced guys like Bernal, Sivakov, Mäder... and is now competing in 1 day races and not stage races, then i don't know what to tell you.

tobydawq said:
If anything, Wellens should have sacrificed himself, making it harder to catch the break.

And how could they possibly have known that they threw away a guaranteed podium shot?
1/ That's what i've been saying the whole time. Wellens was never going to compete here against lighter and more explosive guys. If anyone should have been driving the break, it should have been him, not Lambrecht.

2/ Lambrecht has already shown to be their most explosive rider on a finish like this. He's actually pretty fast in the sprint, and he clearly was in good shape. He won an uphill finish against Albasini last year, also won in similar sprints in the U23, nearly beat Alaphilippe two weeks ago and finished ahead of Kwiatkowski, Schachmann then... So again, like i already said before the race started, he was their best bet. Funilly enough, De Cauwer and JVDB said the exact same thing i did, that he shouldn't have placed that attack. And while you may laugh at JVDB's view on the matter, surely De Cauwer has a more believable opinion.
 
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Logic-is-your-friend said:
RedheadDane said:
Wasn't it you who defended Evenepoel's aggressive - but tactically unsmart - attacking in Turkey? Saying he was simply testing his legs.
Yup. That was me. Evenepoel is a 19 year old, who had only raced 1.5 years as a junior, who had no competition among his peers at all, did not ride as a U23 at all, and has no point of reference coming into the pros. A rider who is targetting 3 week GT GC in the long run. If you can't see the difference, between him and a guy like Lambrecht, who has been racing since he was a kid, who was a succesfull junior, a succesful U23, raced guys like Bernal, Sivakov, Mäder... and is now competing in 1 day races and not stage races, then i don't know what to tell you.
So, you're saying that because a rider has been riding since he was a kid, then he shouldn't be allowed to ride aggressively?
 
Re: Re:

RedheadDane said:
Logic-is-your-friend said:
RedheadDane said:
Wasn't it you who defended Evenepoel's aggressive - but tactically unsmart - attacking in Turkey? Saying he was simply testing his legs.
Yup. That was me. Evenepoel is a 19 year old, who had only raced 1.5 years as a junior, who had no competition among his peers at all, did not ride as a U23 at all, and has no point of reference coming into the pros. A rider who is targetting 3 week GT GC in the long run. If you can't see the difference, between him and a guy like Lambrecht, who has been racing since he was a kid, who was a succesfull junior, a succesful U23, raced guys like Bernal, Sivakov, Mäder... and is now competing in 1 day races and not stage races, then i don't know what to tell you.
So, you're saying that because a rider has been riding since he was a kid, then he shouldn't be allowed to ride aggressively?
What i'm saying is very clearly in my post. It's up to you to read it or not.
 
He literally didn't pull once after the finish line. Ciccone passed him immediately after the finish line followed by an attack from Ulissi (yeah the guy that was third in the end). After that Lambrecht kept himself safe around 5th position in that group. Sure, Wellens could've worked for Lambrecht, but you're naive if you think a guy with his status and who has been preparing for this week all year (ofc he wasnt gonna win but still) is gonna work for a 22y old boy who has never ridden this final. In a perfect world yes, in modern cycling a big fat no.

You're also saying he has shown to be Lotto's best rider on a finish like this. Can I ask where? There was only one Lotto rider who has shown to be able to be close on this finish and that was Vanendert. You're using Lambrechts sprints against Albasini and Ala as prove, but those finishes aren't even comparable to the Mur de Huy and you know that.

You're using Van Den Broeck and De Cauwers opinion to back up your argument. Well both didnt know the reason of his attack did they? De Cauwer said it in the moment, and ofc everyone was thinking "what is he doing" at that moment. I was too. But his argument is pretty solid and doesnt sound weird at all. Lambrecht hates fighting for position and hates windy parts. Van Den Broeck did not hear Lambrechts explanation yet before making his statements.

The Evenepoel case is funny too. Why aren't you criticizing DQS in his case? Shouldn't they have told him not to attack if its LTS fault for not telling Lambrecht not to attack (even if he has a good reason to do it)?
 
Re: Re:

Samamba said:
The Evenepoel case is funny too. Why aren't you criticizing DQS in his case? Shouldn't they have told him not to attack if its LTS fault for not telling Lambrecht not to attack (even if he has a good reason to do it)?
Logic-is-your-friend said:
Evenepoel is a 19 year old, who had only raced 1.5 years as a junior, who had no competition among his peers at all, did not ride as a U23 at all, and has no point of reference coming into the pros. A rider who is targetting 3 week GT GC in the long run.
In the grand scheme of things, Evenepoel getting on the podium of ToT, is meaningless. Even if he were able to win it, it would have been "nice" but the experience of testing his limits, is a lot more valuable, since he has never had that opportunity. He started racing as a junior, crushed the opposition, and then he skipped the U23. He basically has no idea where he stands since he is lacking a point of reference, lacking experience.

This is completely different for Lambrecht. Not only has Lambrecht raced through the youth ranks, faced opposition like Bernal, Sivakov, Sosa... Already raced an entire year among the pro's. But he said he is targetting races just like FW for the next years, focussing and training specifically for them, as an end goal. For Evenepoel, races like ToT aren't a goal in itself at all. He is racing those races to gain experience, aiming higher in the long run.

tobydawq said:
https://twitter.com/bjorg_lambrecht/status/1121145343603871746
lol
"Hey everybody, this time, it wasn't our fault!!"
 
Re:

tobydawq said:
The main problem in your argumentation remains: The attack did NOT cost him any more energy than staying in the peloton would have.
Ofcourse it did. But nor he, nor the team will ever admit that. There was no need to attack like he did, he could just as well, made sure to stay in the front on the climb. But anyway, let's drop it. I've said everything i needed to say.
 
Re: Re:

Logic-is-your-friend said:
tobydawq said:
The main problem in your argumentation remains: The attack did NOT cost him any more energy than staying in the peloton would have.
Ofcourse it did. But nor he, nor the team will ever admit that. There was no need to attack like he did, he could just as well, made sure to stay in the front on the climb. But anyway, let's drop it. I've said everything i needed to say.
Maybe you missed my earlier post (I posted just before you did). There I explained why an attacking display might not be such a horrible thing...
 
It just seems strange to me how everybody criticises (sorry, I can't spell…) riders for not being aggressive, but if a rider is aggressive, then suddenly that's wrong.
Who knows? Maybe Lambrecht's first big win will come because of aggressive riding-style.

Logic-is-your-friend said:
RedheadDane said:
Logic-is-your-friend said:
RedheadDane said:
Wasn't it you who defended Evenepoel's aggressive - but tactically unsmart - attacking in Turkey? Saying he was simply testing his legs.
Yup. That was me. Evenepoel is a 19 year old, who had only raced 1.5 years as a junior, who had no competition among his peers at all, did not ride as a U23 at all, and has no point of reference coming into the pros. A rider who is targetting 3 week GT GC in the long run. If you can't see the difference, between him and a guy like Lambrecht, who has been racing since he was a kid, who was a succesfull junior, a succesful U23, raced guys like Bernal, Sivakov, Mäder... and is now competing in 1 day races and not stage races, then i don't know what to tell you.
So, you're saying that because a rider has been riding since he was a kid, then he shouldn't be allowed to ride aggressively?
What i'm saying is very clearly in my post. It's up to you to read it or not.
No, it isn't clearly. Besides; isn't it usually in one-day races it pays to be aggressive, and GCs in pays to play it tactically?
 
Feb 20, 2019
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Have to agree with Logic here. Comparing Evenepoel's short-term ambitions with Lambrecht's is not a firm base for argumentation. They are both in very different stages of their respective careers.

Regarding Lambrecht, regardless if it really was Lotto's tactics or not, he expended energy which could have come handy in the finale by attacking when he did. Like Logic said, if riding in crosswinds/echelons isn't his specialty then they, as a team, could have just agreed to bring Lambrecht to the front before the climb. He obviously had the legs to stay in front without having to over-exert himself by attacking. I don't underestimate the level of exertion it takes to fight for positions, I just think that attacking like he did costs more energy when put side by side. Especially if Lotto knew that Lambrecht was going to be their guy for today they could have chosen to protect him.

That's where this argument basically hits a wall, I suppose. Seems they didn't necessarily see Lambrecht as their main guy today so they didn't build a team "around him". I mean, I always knew it was gonna be between him and Vanendert if it came to a "bunch sprint" uphill. Wellens will always need to attack in anticipation of the Mur in order to have a chance of winning imo.

Oh well, what's done is done. Let's see how he does in LBL now.
 

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