The New Danish Generation

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You would think that, but the only really great rider to come out of Vejle is Tony Rominger ;)
The area around Silkeborg seems to be a much better training ground, judged by the number of good pros coming from there.
Silkeborg 's hills are longer but the gradients are mild and the roads are often wide. You will find a lot of Poggio-esque climbs in that era.

Those in Vejle are short but really nasty. And there are enough of them to make a really hard WT classics without using the same climbs as a loop.

The problem will the same as in Amstel.. there are exceptionally many bumps, tunnels, railway crossings, traffics islands, bollards, narrow paths and annoying obstacles in that area. I'm not sure it's safe for a full pro-peloton.
 
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Is that a type of Danish Sports school/college?
Now you made me remember all that Aspire - School for Sport Excellence, ads on Eurosport a few years ago.

Those and Sidi, Visit Croatia, Incredible India, Jerusalem, the years where Eurosport put adverts for random CD collections, etc. Way better than those repeated top-5 motorcycle stunts or behind the back shots they put now.
 
Now you made me remember all that Aspire - School for Sport Excellence, ads on Eurosport a few years ago.

Those and Sidi, Visit Croatia, Incredible India, Jerusalem, the years where Eurosport put adverts for random CD collections, etc. Way better than those repeated top-5 motorcycle stunts or behind the back shots they put now.
Or those ridiculously expensive Hästens beds. But that may have been only in the Scandinavian rendition.
 
Denmark really needs a hard one day race.
You could create a ridiculously hard race, if you started on the west coast of Jutland and rode along the coast (north to south), where you get both the wind from the North Sea and can include some gravel sectors - and then cut across Jutland to Vejle for a puncheur finish.

If you started in for instance Ringkoebing, it works out at around 220 K.

As a spring or fall race, where the wind really plays a factor, it could become an instant classic.
 
Now you made me remember all that Aspire - School for Sport Excellence, ads on Eurosport a few years ago.

Those and Sidi, Visit Croatia, Incredible India, Jerusalem, the years where Eurosport put adverts for random CD collections, etc. Way better than those repeated top-5 motorcycle stunts or behind the back shots they put now.
Those Sidi adds.

Cue Nibali and Basso cooking:
T T T T T T Tuuuu T T T T T Tuuuu Be Be T T T T T T T Da D D Da
View: https://youtu.be/K6kGxUqf0vA


I also remember that Salice is made from Sport.
 
You could create a ridiculously hard race, if you started on the west coast of Jutland and rode along the coast (north to south), where you get both the wind from the North Sea and can include some gravel sectors - and then cut across Jutland to Vejle for a puncheur finish.

If you started in for instance Ringkoebing, it works out at around 220 K.

As a spring or fall race, where the wind really plays a factor, it could become an instant classic.
It's actually a good idea. Holmsland Klit would be a very windy experience in the early spring or late autumn.

Problem is the large of chunks of flats between the coast of the North Sea and Vejle area. Would you throw in some gravel there?

Personally I like the idea of either Sønderborg - Vejle/Billund or Aarhus - Vejle/Billund better for practical reason (almost no transport to the airports) and the most amount of climbing as possible.

Properly with a flat finish in front of Legoland for earlier action like in the classics. Although I'm willing to change the location from Billund to Vejle if flats before Legoland becomes too much. What do you guys think? :laughing:
 
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Denmark really needs a hard one day race.
And even more a WT-team. We have several teams from nations with few or absolutely none top cyclists (Bahrain, UAE, Isreal, South Africa)., but lack teams from both Italy and Denmark. Most of Asgreen, Pedersen, Kragh Andersen and Valgren in one team supported by some of the other Danish guys and some Norwegians would be have been great! Mostly aiming for one day classcis and stage wins in GTs and one week-races. Drop pure sprinters and down prioritize GC.
 
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And even more a WT-team. We have several teams from nations with few or absolutely none top cyclists (Bahrain, UAE, Isreal, South Africa)., but lack teams from both Italy and Denmark. Most of Asgreen, Pedersen, Kragh Andersen and Valgren in one team supported by some of the other Danish guys and some Norwegians would be have been great! Mostly aiming for one day classcis and stage wins in GTs and one week-races. Drop pure sprinters and down prioritize GC.
Danish pros sure don't seem to be suffering from the lack of a Danish team.
Fun fact: there are more than twice as many Danes on the WorldTour, than Norwegians, Swede, and Finn combined.
 
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Apr 3, 2017
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And even more a WT-team. We have several teams from nations with few or absolutely none top cyclists (Bahrain, UAE, Isreal, South Africa)., but lack teams from both Italy and Denmark. Most of Asgreen, Pedersen, Kragh Andersen and Valgren in one team supported by some of the other Danish guys and some Norwegians would be have been great! Mostly aiming for one day classcis and stage wins in GTs and one week-races. Drop pure sprinters and down prioritize GC.
I couldn’t agree more even tho the danish riders seem to manage fine without a WT team but it would be amazing.

and it’s a disaster that there isn’t an Italian WT team we really need that.
 
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Suffering? No. But it would just be more interesting with Danish team than the teams from several of the mentioned nations.
I think following Danish cycling is quite interesting these days. Of course I suppose it would be different now, but back in the CSC/Saxo days the Danes on that team were rarely the stars, whereas now several of the Danish riders on foreign teams are stars:
Fuglsang - though he's not exactly "new generation".
M. Pedersen.
Asgreen.
S. Kragh.
Cort.
Valgren.
Uttrup.
E. Norsgaard
Vingegaard is getting there.
 
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Fun fact: there are more than twice as many Danes on the WorldTour, than Norwegians, Swede, and Finn combined.
Finn Fisher-Black may very well be promoted soon.


I was never really on board the CSC/Saxo Bank/Tinkoff train myself, mainly because I felt that Danish TV2 was forcing me to root for them which I didn't like. With the results we see now, I don't really think it matter much if there's a Danish WT team or not as long as the youth development is on a high level, and there are Danish staff on other WT teams.

I would have nothing against seeing a Danish women's team again, though, which wouldn't have to be a WWT team.
 
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The expected 2022 Uno X women's team have said that it will have a Norwegian / Danish focus. But with Team Coop Hitec and most Danish stars being contracted through 2022, it seems it will be difficult to attract top N/DK talent in the first year. One option of signing a talent is Mie Saabye, who has made a comeback for Rytger this year, and showed great potential as a junior. Also, Rikke Lønne of Rytger and some of the young guns from Rytger and ABC elite women's team might be of interest. And Birgitte Krogsgaard, if she is not focusing on being a full time doctor now.
But neither of these are what you call star signings / fully developed riders. But maybe that is ok for the first season of the team.
 
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Danish pros sure don't seem to be suffering from the lack of a Danish team.
Fun fact: there are more than twice as many Danes on the WorldTour, than Norwegians, Swede, and Finn combined.
Well, that's kind of because they have other endurance sports to scratch that itch. There's an awful lot more Norwegians, Swedes and Finns on the cross-country skiing World Cup than Danes (which might be why that's where they're now sourcing cyclists from). The one that's kind of surprising is that Norway is the only one of the four that is particularly prominent in speed skating (yea, I know Sweden has Nils van der Ploeg, before a Dutchie who is interested in the sport corrects me, but they don't have much else by way of depth), when you'd think Finland's abundance of lakes, and Denmark's geographical similarity to northern Germany and the Netherlands where the sport is popular, might give it more credence. And of course quite a few speed skaters also cycle, especially among the women. I know that while back in the days of Niels Lyhne it was a useful mode of transport, the modern winters aren't really conducive to it unless you've got the proper facilities, and so presumably the sport has died off in Denmark in the same way as the United Kingdom, which similarly used to do a lot more by way of ice sport.
 
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Well, that's kind of because they have other endurance sports to scratch that itch. There's an awful lot more Norwegians, Swedes and Finns on the cross-country skiing World Cup than Danes (which might be why that's where they're now sourcing cyclists from). The one that's kind of surprising is that Norway is the only one of the four that is particularly prominent in speed skating (yea, I know Sweden has Nils van der Ploeg, before a Dutchie who is interested in the sport corrects me, but they don't have much else by way of depth), when you'd think Finland's abundance of lakes, and Denmark's geographical similarity to northern Germany and the Netherlands where the sport is popular, might give it more credence. And of course quite a few speed skaters also cycle, especially among the women. I know that while back in the days of Niels Lyhne it was a useful mode of transport, the modern winters aren't really conducive to it unless you've got the proper facilities, and so presumably the sport has died off in Denmark in the same way as the United Kingdom, which similarly used to do a lot more by way of ice sport.
There is a definitely lack of facilities in Denmark, which also was the reason why Elena Rigas, who participated in the Pyeongchang Olympics, decided to end her speed skating career at 23.
 
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Well, that's kind of because they have other endurance sports to scratch that itch. There's an awful lot more Norwegians, Swedes and Finns on the cross-country skiing World Cup than Danes (which might be why that's where they're now sourcing cyclists from). The one that's kind of surprising is that Norway is the only one of the four that is particularly prominent in speed skating (yea, I know Sweden has Nils van der Ploeg, before a Dutchie who is interested in the sport corrects me, but they don't have much else by way of depth), when you'd think Finland's abundance of lakes, and Denmark's geographical similarity to northern Germany and the Netherlands where the sport is popular, might give it more credence. And of course quite a few speed skaters also cycle, especially among the women. I know that while back in the days of Niels Lyhne it was a useful mode of transport, the modern winters aren't really conducive to it unless you've got the proper facilities, and so presumably the sport has died off in Denmark in the same way as the United Kingdom, which similarly used to do a lot more by way of ice sport.
This is the Cyclingnews forum, not the Skiingnews forum.
However, I do occassionally see a guy ski on the street where I live.
 
It's actually a good idea. Holmsland Klit would be a very windy experience in the early spring or late autumn.

Problem is the large of chunks of flats between the coast of the North Sea and Vejle area. Would you throw in some gravel there?
I don't think that would be much of an issue.

First because it would largely be tail/side wind (with "normal" weather) going across Jutland, and second because you need to get across the "Jutland Ridge" on the way, which stretches all the way from Billund to Vejle, so there will be a lot of hilly terrain on the way.
 
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Close shave today, for a new name for this thread:

Anthon Charmig of Uno-X.

Caught 200 m from the line, on the king stage of Tour of Turkey, which is his first race of the season.

Not knowing the climb clearly cost him, what could have been both the stage win and the overall win - but promising performance nonetheless.
 
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Close shave today, for a new name for this thread:

Anthon Charmig of Uno-X.

Caught 200 m from the line, on the king stage of Tour of Turkey, which is his first race of the season.

Not knowing the climb clearly cost him, what could have been both the stage win and the overall win - but promising performance nonetheless.
Yes, I think it's quite rare to see someone misjudge the effort so badly in a direct battle between "favourites" on an MTF. But he looked quite a bit bigger than his rivals so I was really impressed.
 
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This is the Cyclingnews forum, not the Skiingnews forum.
However, I do occassionally see a guy ski on the street where I live.
Sure, but the presence of a significant amount of facilities for, and attention given to, cross-country skiing and related sports is probably a significant factor in why these countries produce fewer cyclists than Denmark. Not only the climate factor, but that there's a higher number of endurance sports with high public profile that are competing for those elite talents.

As for Charmig, he's got a serious climbing engine, let there be no doubt.

1 Anthon Charmig (age 21)
2 Ben Dyball (9 years older, veteran of the Asia Tour, winner of the Tour de Langkawi in 2019 (inc. Genting Highlands stage) and Tour de Banyuwangi Ijen in 2018 (inc. Ijen Crater stage) +3'52
3 Pierpaolo Ficara (7 years older, veteran of Amore e Vita, 2nd in the Tour de Savoie-Mont-Blanc in 2019) +4'52
5 Etienne van Empel (4 years older, Vini Zabù pro) +6'04
6 John Kronborg Ebsen (10 years older, Asia Tour journeyman and former winner of the climb) +6'35
12 Steff Cras (2 years older, at that point a Katyusha prospect, who'd just done the Vuelta and finished top 30 in Lombardia) +13'48
 
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I don't think that would be much of an issue.

First because it would largely be tail/side wind (with "normal" weather) going across Jutland, and second because you need to get across the "Jutland Ridge" on the way, which stretches all the way from Billund to Vejle, so there will be a lot of hilly terrain on the way.
Between Nymindegab and Billund, there is still (at least) 70 km of flat. Scheldeprijs flat.

You heart is in the right place but it's a lot of "wasted space" in a 220k race.
 
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