Tour De France 2012, Andy Schlek, Wiggins, Froome, Basso etc to skinny?

Mar 10, 2009
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Can the mods please move this thread to the "I need attention Section of the Forum". Thanks.
 
Jul 8, 2012
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Horner is the perfect example what weight loss can do for a cyclist. Usually he was around 150 lbs and did some decent results. A couple of years ago he decided to start eating healthy (No more burgers or anything) and dropped to 140 lbs. And man did his climbing take off. I know, some will say it was just not the weight loss...



Integral to dialing in Horner’s power-to-weight ratio was the diet he and girlfriend Megan Elliott, a two-time under-23 national road champion, devised.

Horner is an athlete with a penchant for hamburgers, candy bars and soda. But together they closely monitored his caloric intake, bringing his weight down from 150 pounds to 140. Though it might sound counter-intuitive, this included nightly dinners out at restaurants.

“We tried it the grocery route, preparing healthy meals at home, but I wasn’t losing weight. While cooking meals, I was snacking, too,” Horner said. “Often you don’t start cooking dinner until you’re hungry, and dinner takes an hour to make. Next thing you know, you’re shredding cheese and cutting yourself an extra thick slice to nibble on, or taking a handful of almonds, or eating a piece of the bread that is supposed to go with your pasta, and even though your dinner is only supposed to be 1,000 calories, you’ve added an extra 700 just snacking while making dinner.”

Horner said he struggled through several hungry nights, and found the discipline required in dieting even more difficult than training: “It’s easy to go out and ride, that’s what you want to do. But you also want to come home and eat with friends and family. That’s what is natural. What is unnatural is to go out to dinner, and while everyone else is having three or four different plates, you are having two, or just one. Sometimes you pay dearly the next day, you’re bonking on the ride, and you have to pull over and just eat what’s in your pocket and give it time to get to the muscles. There were a few days of that.”

The result was that, for the first time in his career, Horner came into the tour of his home state at 100-percent form. It’s what led him to declare, after winning on Sierra Road, that Alberto Contador is the only rider in the sport that is capable of consistently dropping him on a climb.
http://velonews.competitor.com/2011/05/news/chris-horner-says-diet-his-biggest-concern-heading-into-tour-de-france_176735
 
Apr 26, 2010
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I always find everything that Horner says to be simple and easy to make sense of.
True what he says about dropping the kgs..often harder than the training.
 
Jun 21, 2011
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Didn't Cav tweet at the beginning of the tour, that being with the team could lead you to an eating disorder ?

I can well imagine....:(
 
Aug 2, 2010
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Falken said:
Horner is the perfect example what weight loss can do for a cyclist. Usually he was around 150 lbs and did some decent results. A couple of years ago he decided to start eating healthy (No more burgers or anything) and dropped to 140 lbs. And man did his climbing take off. I know, some will say it was just not the weight loss...





http://velonews.competitor.com/2011/05/news/chris-horner-says-diet-his-biggest-concern-heading-into-tour-de-france_176735
it's funny because wiggins was an 85kg no fat man, gold medalist. then he lost 20kg of muscle, and is now much more powerful on everything :rolleyes:
 
Jun 1, 2011
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Marcuccio said:
I always find everything that Horner says to be simple and easy to make sense of.
True what he says about dropping the kgs..often harder than the training.
The past few year's, going into the Cali and the Tour, he and Elliot have eaten out at restaurants where they can get a chief to prepare the exact calories needed to keep weight down. No excess. The reason Horner gives is that cooking at home, he lack the disipline necessary to keep from snacking extra calories like cheese.

I find this question a bit silly, it would never be ask of a marathon runner. In cycling you have a variety of body types. Each suited for different routes and tasks. Horner and others are mountain goats and can excell in the big mountains where they have long climb after climb. It weakens you, however, in other areas and you have to rely more on the bigger teammates on the flat.
 
Mar 21, 2011
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What surprises me is how bad Horner was eating before. Aren't these people supposed to be pros? It's not that hard to eat properly :/
 
Mar 21, 2011
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c&cfan said:
it's funny because wiggins was an 85kg no fat man, gold medalist. then he lost 20kg of muscle, and is now much more powerful on everything :rolleyes:
He was 82kg, now at 69kg (although he said 71kg the other day), which although a lot is less than you suggest
 
Maybe it's just coincidence (or my imagination) but there do seem to be a lot of taller-than-usual GC riders around currently. The Schlecks, Wiggins, Froome, Van Den Broeck, Hesdejal, Gesink - all in the 1.85m (6'0") - 1.90m (6'2") range and all very thin of course
 
Nov 17, 2009
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c&cfan said:
it's funny because wiggins was an 85kg no fat man, gold medalist. then he lost 20kg of muscle, and is now much more powerful on everything :rolleyes:
I honestly don't know... but was he carrying a large amount of upperbody weight before?

I don't know if it's just the surroundings or the suit he wears, but he looked a lot more rounded and less defined in the old track images of him that I've ssen.

Was his upper body always as skeletal as it looks now?
 

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