Veilleux retires

Mar 26, 2009
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David Veilleux (Team Europcar) calls it a day and decide to retire for finish his studies.
In the italian media many people sent compliments to the french by saying it was a brave (or smart? depends on the point of views) decision.

Taking a quick look at his career;

-he started racing at 20 years old as pro which could be a bit early
-the past 3 seasons (including this one) are the best of his career

So by adding the fact that probably right now he is having a contract of about.....100.000 euro (feel free to correct me), I cant see why he could not try to keep going 1 more year while continuing his studies as some others did.

This situation reminds me of an italian local pro who was riding for Liquigas some years ago, he had an offer to continue for 1 more year for 50.000euro, but he took some time for think about it; when he realized he wasnt gonna get that money with any other job the team had found someone else.
 
I would be suspicious if he weren't going to do the Canadian races before retiring.

Well, I suppose it could still be a case of "I didn't like what I saw in the pro peloton/Europcar, so I'd rather walk away", but I don't see that as more likely than the official explanation.
 
Apr 14, 2010
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I know its clinic policy to always assume the worst but its possible that cycling just isn't what he wants to do. My sister became a professional musician at age 15. Unbelievably talented. Got to about 21 and decided "meh I'm done with this". Hardly ever touches the instrument anymore.
 
Jun 19, 2009
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therhodeo said:
I know its clinic policy to always assume the worst but its possible that cycling just isn't what he wants to do. My sister became a professional musician at age 15. Unbelievably talented. Got to about 21 and decided "meh I'm done with this". Hardly ever touches the instrument anymore.
Hehe - yet you are the first to mention the Clinic angle.

Although to be fair, I was curious as to why a pretty good rider would decide to change now and was there indeed a doping dilemma element to it.

I would doubt it, as many that turned away from the sport for a doping reason were quite peed off and bitter about it and usually had little lined up when they unclicked.

This appears a conscious choice to leave on a high and pursue a longterm career. Kudos.
 
Aug 7, 2010
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Dr. Maserati said:
Hehe - yet you are the first to mention the Clinic angle.

Although to be fair, I was curious as to why a pretty good rider would decide to change now and was there indeed a doping dilemma element to it.

I would doubt it, as many that turned away from the sport for a doping reason were quite peed off and bitter about it and usually had little lined up when they unclicked.

This appears a conscious choice to leave on a high and pursue a longterm career. Kudos.
He's a family guy, wants to finish school, and have a real life after cycling given that he has accepted that he has limited opportunities in cycling. I agree that often times surprise retirements are shortly followed by bad news but this is not the case for David.
 
--- Sorry, but, the bad humor bug got me this morning ---

therhodeo said:
I know its clinic policy to always assume the worst but its possible that cycling just isn't what he wants to do. My sister became a professional musician at age 15. Unbelievably talented. Got to about 21 and decided "meh I'm done with this". Hardly ever touches the instrument anymore.
I hate it when innate talent must give in to the status quo. What kind of performance enhancement issues within the music industry was she faced with? :p

frenchfry said:
He appears to be the opposite of Jeannie "my coach/husband does EPO but not me" Longo
So in this case he does, and his wife/coach doesn't? :eek:

--- everyone ok back to regular programming now ---

Dave.
 
Oct 16, 2009
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therhodeo said:
I know its clinic policy to always assume the worst but its possible that cycling just isn't what he wants to do. My sister became a professional musician at age 15. Unbelievably talented. Got to about 21 and decided "meh I'm done with this". Hardly ever touches the instrument anymore.
This. My thoughts went the same place as OP's when I first heard of his retirement, but good luck to him. I can certainly understand why some riders would find today's peloton a less than ideal work arena. Besides, there are much more interesting things to do with your life than riding a bicycle, if you have the ability and the drive.
 
goggalor said:
This. My thoughts went the same place as OP's when I first heard of his retirement, but good luck to him. I can certainly understand why some riders would find today's peloton a less than ideal work arena. Besides, there are much more interesting things to do with your life than riding a bicycle, if you have the ability and the drive.
You can always ride your bicycle. Even Steve Bauer has been seen in Masters' races.

There may be a strong argument that it is a lot more fun to support your cycling habit with external income, than to become dependent upon cycling for your income. At least until someone cleans the damn sport up.

Dave.
 
Sep 21, 2011
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He has said plenty of time in the canadian media that he didn't like beeing alone in Europe, away of his family, and that getting his degree in mechanical engineering was a priority.
 
Sep 13, 2010
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LaPlagne87 said:
Reminds me of Mark Scanlon....Junior World Champ for 1998. Retired at 27 or so.
Another pro rider that retired early was Christian Werner. He wasn't offered a renewal by T-mobile and didn't get another pro-tour offer at 26.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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To establish a career in Engineering you need to get in young enough. He will be near 30 by the time he finishes his basic engineering degree and maybe a few more if he has an advanced specialty. His cycling probably is paying for the education. I am sad to see such a talented young rider quit as his star is rising but life is long after retiring at 34 or so. Only a few make a complete life out of a pro career.
That David sees that and can chase a more ordinary life might just be a sign of his maturity. What a privilege to have had the career he has.
 
D-Queued said:
You can always ride your bicycle. Even Steve Bauer has been seen in Masters' races.

There may be a strong argument that it is a lot more fun to support your cycling habit with external income, than to become dependent upon cycling for your income. At least until someone cleans the damn sport up.

Dave.
this is my take. We act like it's such a privilege to be able to turn pro that you should slave away as a domestique for pennies for over a decade of the prime years of your life. News flash, you can get an education and a desk job and have more than enough income to ride the top gear, racing opportunities abound if that tickles your fancy, and you aren't living the life of a migrant farm worker.
 
Master50 said:
To establish a career in Engineering you need to get in young enough. He will be near 30 by the time he finishes his basic engineering degree and maybe a few more if he has an advanced specialty. His cycling probably is paying for the education. I am sad to see such a talented young rider quit as his star is rising but life is long after retiring at 34 or so. Only a few make a complete life out of a pro career.
That David sees that and can chase a more ordinary life might just be a sign of his maturity. What a privilege to have had the career he has.
Ding ding ... we have a winner.
 
Apr 7, 2010
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living the 'pro athlete' life is really difficult, most people have never had an insight into what it is like behind the scenes but it is not like going on a holiday. constantly travelling, away from friends and family, all the training, the pressure to perform, giving up your social life, spending all your time around (often) a bunch of people you wouldnt be friends with otherwise... it is not easy

plus some people who are really good at racing bikes are not as into it as the average fan and just get sick of it all, fair enough too
 

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