2016 TdF, Stage 12: Montpellier → Mont Ventoux (178km)

Aug 31, 2014
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Stage 12: Montpellier → Mont Ventoux (Chalet Reynard) (178 km, Mountain)

Thursday, July 14th (Bastille day
) • Stage infoStartlistRoadbookRules • Weather: Start, Halfway, Finish
Starts at 12:15 - Live video from 14:15 - Finish at 16:55 (CEST) • Live tickerLivestreams

Due to high wind speeds forecast at the summit of Mont Ventoux, stage 12 has been shortened by 6 km and will finish lower down the slopes at Chalet Reynard.
Be aware that the stage might finish a bit earlier than originally planned.
CyclingNews Article
Route:



Profile:



Mountain passes & hills:
Km 131.5 - Côte de Gordes 3.3 kilometre-long climb at 4.8% - category 4
Km 135.5 - Col des Trois Termes 2.5 kilometre-long climb at 7.5% - category 3
Km 184.0 - MONT VENTOUX (1 912 m) 15.7 kilometre-long climb at 8.8% - category H




Preview:
CyclingQuotes.com said:
Among the climbs that are regularly used for summit finishes at the Tour de France, two have a special status. L’Alpe d’Huez has written itself into the history of the race and holds a special place in the race, always featuring on the course every second year. The second legendary mountain is Mont Ventoux but it’s a much rarer feature on the course. In fact, it has only been used four times since the turn of the century but this year it will make a welcome return after a relatively short three-year absence. With its unique positon as a lonely climb in Provence, it always serves as a great way to break the monotony in between the two major mountain ranges and keeps the GC riders busy at a point of the race where it is usually all about staying safe. With its inclusion, things couldn’t have been more different: now the riders face one of the most important and hardest stages at a time when the GC is usually relatively unchanged.

To make the stage even more special, it will even be held on Bastille Day, just like it did in 2013. This year the riders will cover 184km from Montpellier to the top of the mythical mountain and like almost every Mont Ventoux stage, it can be split into two parts. First the riders will travel along completely flat roads in a norteasterly direction as they continue their journey from the Pyrenees to the Alps. Along the way, they will contest the completely flat and straight intermediate sprint at the 102.5km mark.

Shortly after the sprint, the riders will turn north to head towards Mont Ventoux and this signals a slight change in the terrain. The double climb of the category 4 Cote de Gordes (3.3km, 4.8%) and category 3 Col des Trois Termes (2.5km, 7.5%) serve a as a warm-up for the big finale. The top of the latter comes with 48.5km to and is followed by a short descent and a flat section that lead to the city of Bedoin at the bottom of the final climb. The legendary ascent averages 8.8km over 15.7km and is known for its brutally tough stat. The first 8km in the forest have gradients of 8-12% for most of the time but there is a small chance to recover in the easy section at Chalet Reynard after 10km of climbing. Then the road ramps up in the famous sandy moonscape near the top where the gradient only gets harder and harder until it culminates at 9.5% for the finale kilometre. In the final 1000m, there is a sharp turn with 800m to go and then a hairpin bend leads to the 80m, 5m finishing straight.

Among the uphill finishes in this year’s Tour, this is definitely the most prestigious and so this is the one that all the GC riders want to win. Especially Chris Froome would love to repeat his performance from three years ago and as the first part of the stage is relatively easy, it is very likely that the major teams will control things and make sure that one of the biggest riders will take the win. However, much will depend on the race situation as there are still lots of mountains to come and if the fight for the overall win is a close on, teams may prefer to save energy for later. This could open the door for a breakaway and so a possible home win on the national holiday. Regardless of the fate of the breakaway, the GC riders will battle it out in the hardest uphill finish of the race and the time gaps are likely to be huge on one of the hardest climbs in Europe. At the same time, the GC riders have to be attentive in the run-in to the climb as the windy conditions in the flat terrain have occasionally led to splits and taken riders out of contention even before the climbing has started.

As said, Mont Ventoux is a regular feature on the course. It was last used in 2013 when Chris Froome crushed the opposition to put 29 seconds into Nairo Quintana and 1.23 into Mikel Nieve and Joaquim Rodriguez. In 2009, Juan Manuel Garate beat Tony Martin in a two-rider battle on a day when Lance Armstrong secured the final third place in the race. In 2002, Richard Virenque emerged as the strongest from a breakaway while Marco Pantani famously won the stage in 2000 after Lance Armstrong had apparently given him the victory. The climb has often been used at the Criterium du Dauphiné too, with Sylwester Szmyd winning in 2009, Christophe Moreau riding away in2007, Denis Menchov being the strongest in 2006, and Alexandre Vinokourov, Iban Mayo, Denis Menchov and Tyler Hamilton winning in 2005, 2004, 2002 and 2000 respectively. In 2008, Robert Gesink won a Paris-Nice stage that finished a few kilometres from the top.
Current GC standings:



Withdrawals Stage 11:
None

All Withdrawals:
LANGEVELD (CPT) RENSHAW (DDD) LADAGNOUS, PINEAU (FDJ) MØRKØV (KAT) CONTADOR (TNK)
192 of 198 riders remain in the race.



← Stage 11 ThreadStage 13 Thread →
 
I don't think that there is a chance that break will win this stage. I think that Froome targets this stage so breakaway won't get a huge advantage but I belive that Quintana will beat Froome in the end and take a stage victory (with a small margin because he won't attack far out).
 
Praying Mantis is wild. :surprised:
however, I believe that Froome wants to win and as usual will be the first to do battle. I think that only Quintana will be able to stand up to him, but the too conservative race on Sunday is not a good sign i think
 
Finally battle between Froome and Quintana hopefully. If anyone else could hang on and fight for the win it would be a very nice suprise

Am I the only one who thinks it's silly that they're not categorising the Ventoux from the bottom of the climb in Bédoin?
 
Re: 2016 TdF, Stage 12: Montpellier → Mont Ventoux (184km)

I really really REALLY hope Quintana won't loose time. I'm really disappointed about how defensively he rode in the pyrenees but I also don't really want that Froome wins a third tour so I'm still rooting for Nairo. Stages 12 and 13 might turn out to be crucial. Froome said he wants to peak later in the race but I still just can't imagine him beating Nairo in the Alps. If Froome wants to win he has to gain time on those two stages and while he almost certainly will gain time in the ITT it's very hard to say what will happen on the Ventoux. One thing is sure though, of all mountain stages this is the one which suits Froome by far the best so everything but an attack by him would be a huge surprise for me.
 
Re:

Red Rick said:
Finally battle between Froome and Quintana hopefully. If anyone else could hang on and fight for the win it would be a very nice suprise

Am I the only one who thinks it's silly that they're not categorising the Ventoux from the bottom of the climb in Bédoin?
Yeah thats strange, but it's HC and the hardest climb of the race anyway.
 
Should be a very interesting stage with a big sort out of the top 10 going into the TT which will provide another shake up. Two very important stages for potential podium riders. If Porte rides well he could jump up the standings as his TT is usually good. But of course all eyes will be be on Quintana and Froome.
 
Re:

Red Rick said:
Finally battle between Froome and Quintana hopefully. If anyone else could hang on and fight for the win it would be a very nice suprise

Am I the only one who thinks it's silly that they're not categorising the Ventoux from the bottom of the climb in Bédoin?
otoh positive thing is that now ventoux has more giro-esque numbers average gradient-wise
 
It's a little disappointing they've put the TT for the day after, it may stop riders going deep here. Froome already mentioned on his rest day interview that the Ventoux stage could be decisive, however they do have to think about Friday as well and not take too much out of themselves.
 
May 2, 2010
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In the past few years Froome has absolutely destroyed people on one major climb stages. I think he'll do it again.
 
Aug 31, 2012
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There's going to be a tailwind for sure. Whether it will help all riders equally remains to be seen
 
Re:

Pricey_sky said:
It's a little disappointing they've put the TT for the day after, it may stop riders going deep here. Froome already mentioned on his rest day interview that the Ventoux stage could be decisive, however they do have to think about Friday as well and not take too much out of themselves.
Surely if one of them goes for it, the other GC guys don't have much choice?
 
Re: Re:

SlickMongoose said:
Pricey_sky said:
It's a little disappointing they've put the TT for the day after, it may stop riders going deep here. Froome already mentioned on his rest day interview that the Ventoux stage could be decisive, however they do have to think about Friday as well and not take too much out of themselves.
Surely if one of them goes for it, the other GC guys don't have much choice?
Of course, however the question remains will anyone want to risk going too far into the red with the TT on Friday. Obviously I hope they do.
 
Apr 3, 2016
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The problem for Quintana is that there are 54k of TT to come. We're it not for the fact that the first tt is hilly and the second a mountain which plays to his strengths I think he would go all out on Ventoux.

As it stands, even though the TT parcours are the best he could hope for it will still be a question of limiting losses to Froome. Therefore, I expect him to be glued to Froome's wheel up the Ventoux, but I'm not expecting fireworks. I think those will come in the Alps.
 

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