2016 TdF, Stage 2: Saint-Lô → Cherbourg-en-Cotentin (183km)

Aug 31, 2014
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Stage 2: Saint-Lô → Cherbourg-en-Cotentin (183 km, Flat)

Sunday, July 3rdStage infoStartlistRoadbookRules • Weather: Start, Halfway, Finish
Starts at 13:00 - Live video from 14:15 - Finish at 17:20 (CEST) • Live tickerLivestreams


Route:



Profile:



Mountain passes & hills:
Km 10.0 - Côte de Torigny-les-Villes 1.4 kilometre-long climb at 5.7% - category 4
Km 23.0 - Côte de Montabot (D28-D98) 1.9 kilometre-long climb at 5% - category 4
Km 52.0 - Côte de Montpinchon 1.2 kilometre-long climb at 5.9% - category 4
Km 181.5 - Côte de La Glacerie 1.9 kilometre-long climb at 6.5% - category 3


Climbs:


Final Kilometres:




Preview:
CyclingQuotes.com said:
When the sprinters got a chance to wear yellow after the first stage in 2013 and 2014, it was always going to be a short-lived affair. In both editions, ASO had designed a tough, hilly stage already on the second day and so Marcel Kittel only got one day in the maillot jaune on both occasions. Apparently, race director Christian Prudhomme likes that formula so there will no second chance to strike back for the sprinters who have missed out in the first stage. Like in the past two editions, the second stage will leave no room for the fastest guys and instead the puncheurs and classics riders look forward to one of their rare chances in this year’s edition of the Tour.

The second stage will bring the riders over 183km from Saint-Lo to Cherbourg-en-Cotentin and like stage 1, it has the potential to be a very nervous and stressful affair. For the second day in a row, the riders will follow the coastal road for most of the time and this could potential wreak havoc on the field if the conditions are right. From the start in Saint-Lo, the riders will briefly head south to go up the category 4 climbs of Cote de Tarigny-les-Villes (1.4km, 5.7%) and Cote de Montabot (1.9km, 5%) after 10km and 29.5km of racing respectively. Then they will turn around and head in a northwesterly direction towards the coast. Along the way, they will tackle the category 4 Cote de Montpinchon (1.2km, 5.9%) at the 52km mark before they get to the sea at the feed zone after 96.5km of racing.

After a lumpy start, the terrain gets significantly flatter as the riders approach the coast and there won’t be much climbing on the coastal road. Here the riders will contest the intermediate sprint at the 107.5km mark, an almost completely flat one with just a single turn 1200m from the line.

After around 140km, the riders will leave the coast and traverse the inland which makes the terrain significantly hillier. There are a few small climbs before the riders again reach the coast which they will get with around 20km to go. From there, they will follow the coastal road to Cherbourg-en-Cotentin where they will go up the small, uncategorized climb of Cote d’Octeville (1.3km, 4.6%) whose top is located with 7.5km to go. From there, a short descent leads to the final challenge, the uphill finish on the category 3 climb of Cote de la Glacerie. It averages 6.5% over 1.9km and includes 500m at an average of 10.5% and with a maximum of 15% just 500m from the top. The KOM sprint comes with 1.5km to go and then a short 500m descent leads to the final 700m which are uphill at 5.7%. It’s a technical finale too as there are numerous turns inside the final 10km. On the climb, there are several winding turn and a left-hand turn in a roundabout. After the top, there are two turns in quick succession but from there, it is a 5.5m wide road that only bends slightly to the right.

Unlike the Giro and Vuelta which usually have lots of opportunities for the puncheurs, the Tour de France often has very little terrain for the classics riders. It’s the same in 2016 and so stage 2 is one of the few opportunities that those riders can realistically target. The finale is tailor-made for riders like Peter Sagan, Michael Matthews, Greg Van Avermaet, Julian Alaphilippe, Alejandro Valverde, Daniel Martin and Simon Gerrans who undoubtedly have set their sights on a stage that could potentially give them the yellow jersey too. To get there, however, they have to get through a very stressful and nervous stage where the wind can again come into play and the many technical challenges in the finale will only make things worse. Guys like Chris Froome and Alberto Contador will look for opportunities to distance Nairo Quintana in the crosswind but otherwise it’s just a day for the GC riders to stay safe and avoid any unnecessary time loss in a finale where there will definitely be lots of splits.

Although the finale of this year's stage has its own special flavour, the Tour paid quite a few visits to Cherbourg in the 1920s, when the organisers tried to follow the contours of the country. Some of these stages went down in history, like in 1923, when rookie Ottavio Bottechia launched an instinctive solo attack two kilometres from the finish of stage 2 to steal the win from under the favourites' nose. The cheeky rider went on to become the first Italian winner of the Tour and again won the race in 1925. In 1924, the stage from Cherbourg to Brest was marred by controversy shortly after the start: brothers Henri and Francis Pélissier, as well as Maurice Ville, withdrew 76 km into the stage, furious at the organisers who supposedly forbade them from putting on several jerseys as protection against the cold. When journalist and writer Albert Londres joined them at the Café de la gare in Coutances, they vented their anger sprinkled with a few drops of chicanery. The resulting piece, published in Le Petit Parisien under the headline Les forçats de la route ("The Convicts of the Road"), became famous.

Cherbourg hasn’t hosted a stage for more than a decade.
Current GC standings:



Abandons Stage 1:
None (!)
198 of 198 riders remain in the race.



← Stage 1 ThreadStage 3 Thread →
 
Re: 2016 TdF, Stage 2: Saint-Lô → Cherbourg-en-Cotentin (183

This should be an interesting stage. High chance of crosswind, an interesting battle between Ardennes classic riders and sprinters like Sagan and Coquard, and whoever wins the stage will probably get yellow.

Moreover we might get our first impressions how strong the gc contenders are and there is still a big question mark behind Contador since we will see if the crash today affects him.
 
Jul 2, 2015
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Can't count out Valverde on a finish like this.

EBH could also be contender. But he was involved in the crash in the final. Hope he is ok.
 
Jul 29, 2012
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Re: Re:

PremierAndrew said:
If Sagan finishes 2nd tomorrow and Cav finishes in the peloton with no time gaps, does Cav keep yellow for more stage wins or does Sagan get it for higher average finishing position?
Sorry but cav will never survive this, no point asking it.

Waiting for cav to survive now :p
 
Matthews and EBH both will be carrying injuries after bad crash today. Looks like it could be between Sagan, GVA and Alaphilippe. The whole stage doesn't look hard enough to me for Valverde to compete with the sprinters, but you never know with him.

Interesting to see what Etixx do. A really hard pace on the final climb suits Alaphilippe most out of the contenders. But it will also put the most time into Kittel - who is in a great position to get yellow later in the week if he can limit losses tomorrow.
 
Aug 31, 2014
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Re: Re:

Irondan said:
BigMac said:
Nice details on the preview, Mantis. Really like the arrow bellow the integral race profile.Easy on the eye as well. Please do all race threads.
Agreed, you've done a fine job with this preview. It befits the race it previews...
Thanks guys! Well, I have all Tour stages ready to go, don't think I'll do ALL race threads though :) Hopefully that little arrow works out all the way for most people, it depends on fonts and stuff.
 
Mar 13, 2015
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Re:

DFA123 said:
Matthews and EBH both will be carrying injuries after bad crash today. Looks like it could be between Sagan, GVA and Alaphilippe. The whole stage doesn't look hard enough to me for Valverde to compete with the sprinters, but you never know with him.

Interesting to see what Etixx do. A really hard pace on the final climb suits Alaphilippe most out of the contenders. But it will also put the most time into Kittel - who is in a great position to get yellow later in the week if he can limit losses tomorrow.
Remind me when did Alaphilippe beat Valverde in uphill sprint? Or in any kind of sprint? So, if the stage is for Alaphilippe, then it is certainly for Valverde too. Although his form might be an issue...
 
Re: Re:

PremierAndrew said:
If Sagan finishes 2nd tomorrow and Cav finishes in the peloton with no time gaps, does Cav keep yellow for more stage wins or does Sagan get it for higher average finishing position?
Sagan would take it on countback as there's been no TT yet. Though it's a moot point as noted.

I mean, it's like choosing which debilitating disease you'd rather be struck down with, but yea...
 
Re: Re:

Mr.White said:
DFA123 said:
Matthews and EBH both will be carrying injuries after bad crash today. Looks like it could be between Sagan, GVA and Alaphilippe. The whole stage doesn't look hard enough to me for Valverde to compete with the sprinters, but you never know with him.

Interesting to see what Etixx do. A really hard pace on the final climb suits Alaphilippe most out of the contenders. But it will also put the most time into Kittel - who is in a great position to get yellow later in the week if he can limit losses tomorrow.
Remind me when did Alaphilippe beat Valverde in uphill sprint? Or in any kind of sprint? So, if the stage is for Alaphilippe, then it is certainly for Valverde too. Although his form might be an issue...
Well, I'm not basing it on historical results. Have you seen Alaphilippe's sprinting this year? He's like Valverde was 12 years ago - basically mixing it with the best in the world even on flattish stages. For me Valverde would be massive favourite if this final climb came in a stage with 2000m+ climbing. Or even perhaps if it was in the second or third week of the Tour.

A 1.5km climb at the end of a flat stage when the whole peloton are fresh and absolutely flying is going to be too fast for Valverde though I think. Hopefully he'll give it a shot, but I wouldn't even be surprised if he just stayed in the peloton and cruised home.
 

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